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Black Steel Baking Sheet

MarieLouise's picture

I mentioned this the other day. Another expensive but worth it item that I discovered via Martha Stewart. I've never tried to bake cookies on it.; I use it for savory things like bruscetta, noodle pancakes, etc. It makes the best Tater tots because they get very crisp.

Mine has turned black-it looks nothing like this picture. I care for it like a cast-iron skillet.

http://www.bridgekitchenware.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=37

lotstolearn's picture

(post #53986, reply #1 of 22)

ML, wouldn't it overbrown cookies? I have some dark Calphalon cookie sheets and they're a nightmare. They overbrown or burn everything. I now use them as drip pans for pies.


I can see how wonderful it would be for taters though. Hadn't thought of using them for that.


 


 


When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

 

When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

MarieLouise's picture

(post #53986, reply #2 of 22)

<ML, wouldn't it overbrown cookies?>

I'm guessing it would, unless it was some sort of thin cookie you wanted to be very crisp. I can't remember what Martha recomended it for; I want to say tuilles or something like that.

doyenne's picture

(post #53986, reply #3 of 22)

Black Steel


Black steel is an excellent conductor of heat and quickly distributes it uniformly throughout the pan. It browns food well and produces thicker crusts. Black Steel also needs to be thoroughly dried and lightly oiled after washing or it will rust


It does make the crust darker but it bakes beautifully. I have some old black steel pans from France. Haven't used them in years. I think they were made by Mariques. The best crepe pans are made of black steel.


I can't remember today what it was I  couldn't remember yesterday

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

Glenys's picture

(post #53986, reply #5 of 22)

"wouldn't it overbrown cookies?"

Sadly most bakers produce underbrowned or anemic baking. There's a lot to be said for the depth of flavour we so fondly refer to as "European brown".

anneelsberry's picture

(post #53986, reply #6 of 22)

"Sadly most bakers produce underbrowned or anemic baking"

White bread, light cookies, white cakes all seems to be an American psychosis.

I finally got around to reading "Perfection Salad" this weekend. Its a sociological look at the Home Economics movement in America in the late 1800s and early 1900s. There is a huge discussion of the desire for bland "white" food at that time. In some ways it was a reaction to the influx of non-English immigrants and the strong flavors of other foods by New Englanders. It was also a way to show you were upwardly mobile (white flour is more expensive than brown, etc.) or weren't interested in food for its more "sensual" characteristics. The "scientific" cooks at the time believed that coating everything in white sauce was a good thing. Its all quite fascinating.

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Glenys's picture

(post #53986, reply #7 of 22)

Last week when we were addressing methods and techniques in vegetable cookery that intensified and developed their flavour and colour, a student asked how it came about that vegetables were historically boiled to death. Good question but not a simple answer is it?

lotstolearn's picture

(post #53986, reply #9 of 22)

No kidding! My mother boiled FROZEN veggies! No wonder a whole generation grew up not wanting to eat veggies!


I just love the sear/steam method in the last FC issue. It really gives you the best of both worlds! Also a great excuse to use a ton of thick-sliced shallots :))


I should have called myself MsShallot or something lol


When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

 

When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

Wolvie's picture

(post #53986, reply #14 of 22)

the sear/steam is good, my fav is roasted / grilled.


The asian broccoli with the black bean from FC is very good. I sometimes roast the broc instead,then toss with the flavorings. But - I do like my broc roasted so you have quite a bit of "brown" bits on the florets.


Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.

 

lotstolearn's picture

(post #53986, reply #8 of 22)

Oh, I enjoy well-browned food, that much is a certainty. But when my cookies are still doughy, yet black on the bottom, that's a problem.


I wonder if adjusting the oven temp down would do it, as for glass pans. Hmmm.


When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

 

When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

Glenys's picture

(post #53986, reply #15 of 22)

As metallurgy goes in cooking, there is no perfection, just the individuality that matches how differently we all cook. Just as Silpats are the extreme opposite of blacksteel, they're not great for all types of baking either. Cookies recipes vary so much that you may find the classic aluminum pan favoured by most bakers to be a better choice over all. I bake a number of shortbread style cookies- both sweet and savoury- that I prefer baked on the black sheet lined with several layers of parchment. Having said that, I never bake without parchment but rarely Silpat.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #53986, reply #16 of 22)

It also depends on the type of oven too.  I usually use parchment and hardly ever use silpat, but I do bake most full sheetpans of bar cookies without parchment - cutting is difficult without getting shreds of paper stuck to the cookies.

lotstolearn's picture

(post #53986, reply #17 of 22)

I use both, depending on the cookie I'm baking. I am going to try using my black pans a little more often and try adjusting the heat down maybe 25 degrees on one batch and see if that helps.


 


When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

 

When life gives you lemons, eat your own weight in chocolate!

assibams's picture

(post #53986, reply #20 of 22)

Here all ovens are equipped with black metal pans. And all recipes end with the same: bake until nicely browned.... The most used temperature for baking cookies and cakes is 200-225C - which is substantially higher than the 375F given in most American recipes I have seen.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Glenys's picture

(post #53986, reply #22 of 22)

Although I rarely baked with anything but tin or blacksteel overseas, I have to say most of my "cookie" experiences were in Italy, and the temperatures were considerably lower- 165°-190°C for most.

Certainly the sheer masses of cookie styles and varieties on North America, from region to region, and certainly personal taste is staggering compared to cookies in other parts of the globe. I was trying to rack my brain to think of a cookie that I made living in England, other than shortbread and brandysnaps!

doyenne's picture

(post #53986, reply #10 of 22)

That is so true. Almost everything my mother baked had a " European brown " crust and had superb flavor. I tend to do my baking that way as well--except for brownies which I always underbake.

I can't remember today what it was I  couldn't remember yesterday

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

transona5's picture

(post #53986, reply #11 of 22)

At work I do the European Brown. My Western European customers have always commented favorably on the color of my pastries. It's the customers that say "kwassan" that are complaining that they're "too dark"... Or it's, "don't you have any Challah that's lighter?" 


Thankfully, the owners, bakery merchandisers, executive chef's, and executive middle under the desk managers of the family owned chain I work for, have absolutely no complaints about my work.


"So, it was sort of a cakewalk --in a grinding, weeks-long, billions of dollars in ordnance, cluster bomb sort of way."


"Ugh, I hate finding cluster bombs in my cake! They get caught in my fillings."


"They also get caught separating kids' arms and legs from their torsos. Hey! Can you bring crutches to a cakewalk?" - Get Your War On clip art comic strip

 

doyenne's picture

(post #53986, reply #13 of 22)

None of them there light " kwassans " for me. I don't buy no light "kwassans " and I don't bake no light " kwassans ." <G>


When I first started to bake, I couldn't figure out why my cakes were not like the ones my mother made. I'm embarassed to say that it took me a while to realize that I had to bake the cakes longer. The trick is learning to distinguish between the European browning point and over-baked dryness. Win a few, lose a few!


I can't remember today what it was I  couldn't remember yesterday

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

assibams's picture

(post #53986, reply #18 of 22)

Help me! What is "kwassan"?

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

MadMom's picture

(post #53986, reply #19 of 22)

It is an affectation that yuppies use when they are looking for a croissant!


Edited to add that I love my DH's pronounciation of Burger King's breakfast sandwiches, made on croissants..."Crow Sandwiches"  - sounds like he is definitely planning on eating a large black bird between two slices of bread.



Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin


Edited 5/8/2003 3:30:47 PM ET by MadMom

assibams's picture

(post #53986, reply #21 of 22)

Thank so much. I tried to figure it out and am glad none of you saw or heard me pronouncing this word every way possible. Now it makes sense.


Have never had any BK "crow sandwiches", but they probably taste the way your DH pronounces them ;-)


Our local baker sells something he calls "Laugencroissant", which is a croissant made with the same dough they use in those large soft pretzels. Major yum!

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

kai230's picture

(post #53986, reply #12 of 22)

Thanks for the new term--I never knew that was the name for my goal in cookies. Very tasty, as if they had a hint of a torch.

Glenys's picture

(post #53986, reply #4 of 22)

I love my black steel sheet pans and actually prefer the black steel quiche pans for really crispy pâte brisée as well. One of my best acquisitions was about a dozen 8" round black steel pizza pans. I make crostata and individual galettes and pizza on them.