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Canning experts- tapenade?

Glenys_'s picture

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My friend wants to process tapenade for gift baskets without need of refrigeration. Of course the usual suspects- garlic and oil- create a problem and even with a blast of lemon juice at the finish, this will require hot water processing. What times do you think for small batch jars like 250 ml or 125 ml, with the snap/seal metal lids?

aussiechef's picture

(post #60851, reply #1 of 16)

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Bet the mls have everyone stumped!

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #2 of 16)

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Canning is such an exact science because of the possibility of botulism. I e-mailed the Ball Canning Jar people, they've been incredibly helpful to me in the past. I told them there would be olives, olive oil, garlic, etc. and if tapenade is even
i advisable
to put up. Your friend might be able to get around the garlic issues by using pickled garlic. It's the olive oil that has me concerned.

The name of the snap/seal jars to which you refer escapes me, but I'll bet they have a website. Contact them as well and we can compare notes.

Li_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #3 of 16)

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i The name of the snap/seal jars

weck?

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #4 of 16)

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In Canada the most popular brand is Bernardin, which has the same availability of jar sizes and lids as Ball in the U.S. I usually refer to a book written with their support called
b Put a Lid On It- Small Batch Preserving for Every Season
but they just recommend freezing it. What that has to do with process canning I don't know. The Olive Company of Provence ships jarred tapenade, so I wonder what the difference would be?

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #5 of 16)

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Well at least I didn't suggest the jars used for canning salmon. That's always a good one.

Jean_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #6 of 16)

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I would guess that pressure canning would be the way they go.

cam14's picture

(post #60851, reply #7 of 16)

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I wonder what the inquisitivecook.com would say. Do you know either of these women Glenys. They may have something. I don't think I'd want to freeze it.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #8 of 16)

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I'm not worried about the olive oil unless it has garlic in it! By snap/seal lids I mean the metal lids lined with a rubber seal and ring that screws in place. They "pop" or "snap" when they cool and the vacuum is formed. You know, basic canning jars.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #9 of 16)

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Since it's low acid, that's my guess. If it doesn't qualify as high acid, it's a candidate for pressure or "boiling-water" canning as they refer to it in the book.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #10 of 16)

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You're right. I'll email them.

Wolverine's picture

(post #60851, reply #11 of 16)

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This is interesting. I have never tried to can tapenade. I would think you'd need 30 minutes, anyway. Not sure what that would do to the flavor of the tapenade.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #12 of 16)

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i ...weck?

Yes, I remembered it was one syllable but couldn't for the life of me come up with it. The French jars with the metal bail are
i Triomphe.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #13 of 16)

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i ...metal lids lined with a rubber seal and ring that screws in place.

Those are simply referred to as "two piece canning lids." The flat part is the
i lid
and the screw-on part is called the
i band.
These are the easiest canning jars to work with.

I have seven books on canning and only
i one
has a mention of olives. It's a pickling book, so I don't believe the information is pertinent to your friend. Perhaps this is something that is simply not done? (Shrugs.)

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #14 of 16)

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Response from the Ball People:

Dear Chiffonade:

Thank you for your message. Unfortunately, we do not have information on canning Tapenade. We don't recommend canning anything with oil in it.

Clostridium botulinum grows in an oxygen-free environment. Because oils are thick, they can create such an airless environment. Botulinum spores, which are present in soil, can be transferred to the oil by garlic or onions, which grow underground. The moisture naturally contained in garlic, herbs and the like also can contribute to the botulism-friendly environment. Garlic and onions are low-acid foods which contributes to the botulism-friendly environment as well.

We appreciate you contacting us and wish you Happy Holidays.

Sincerely,
Consumer Affairs

i In short...don't do it. If your friend wants to give Tapenade - tell her to make it, store in fridge and jar the day she wants to give the gift. Advise the recipient that it should be consumed somewhat quickly. Keep in mind, the more acid ingredients added to the tapenade, the longer it will last in the fridge.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #15 of 16)

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Sorry about the confusion with the "snap" thing: SNAP turns out to be the trademarked name for this brand of lid.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60851, reply #16 of 16)

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Thanks Chiff! As you can see they've repeated all caveats, then I looked at a jar of Italian tapenade in the fridge- black olives, olive oil and sea salt. Does have an expiry date of 2002 however. She plans to use brined olives, capers, lemon juice and roasted garlic. In the land of home-canned salmon, it's hard to tell people that a vegetable based product can't be canned with proper techniques, then on the other hand, techniques for canning tomatoes have changed so radically because of their inbred low acidity.
I haven't heard anything back from the Inquisitive Cook forum.