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Pork Loin Filet vs tenderloin

dixie_'s picture

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Can someone please tell me the difference in these two cuts?

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #1 of 24)

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If you think about a beef T-bone or even more, a porterhouse steak, the tenderloin is the small oval and the loin is the big "slab". It is the same with a loin pork chop. I have not seen it referred to as "pork loin filet"--just boneless pork loin and then pork tenderloin.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #2 of 24)

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This is not what I am talking about. The Pork Loin filet looks the same as a tenderloin - not the big "slab". Armour has them in our supermarkets and they are just a wee bit larger than a tenderloin. In fact I bought one and Albertson's had put their label on it (buy one-get one free)- They first labeled tenderloin, then marked through with marker and labeled Pork Loin Filet. I had never heard of it either, but it is not boneless pork loin and apparently not tenderloin.

Michael_P.'s picture

(post #58643, reply #3 of 24)

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It sounds as if they got a small pork loin roast and gave it a fancy name. Is it the same color as a pork loin? In our supermarkets here we have pork loin roasts that are the same diameter as a beef tenderloin and also ones that are a larger tied roll. Don't know if this helps.

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #58643, reply #4 of 24)

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I also don't know if this will help, but in Germany tenderloin is called filet - perhaps they've just given the same old cut a fancier name in your supermarket?

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #5 of 24)

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Dixie-If you have the Complete Meat Cookbook, there is a multiple-page discussion of the differences beginning on page 312. He agrees w/ Gretchen-says that the tenderloin corresponds to the fillet from the beef. He doesn't mention pork loin fillets, but he has pictures of all the different cuts of pork loins that would help you identify it by its other names.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #58643, reply #6 of 24)

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Never heard of it.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #7 of 24)

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I give up, cannot get the picture to post here, but here is a picture attached

Glenys_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #8 of 24)

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Don't you think by the price and the caption they're describing pork tenderloin as (the) fillet? Page 312 points out avoiding confusion in the use of"loin", sounds like they're trying to do just that. I'm surprized how expensive pork is there, when normally food is so much cheaper in the U.S. before we even think about the exchange! Interesting!

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #9 of 24)

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Now that I see the picture, I think it resembles the center-cut pork loin, boneless. That makes sense because the ad calls it a "half-loin." Armour probably paid some consultant big bucks to run focus groups and determine that using the phrase "pork loin fillet" sounded better than "boneless pork loin."

So, back to your original question, Dixie- Per Bruce, " Unfortunately, it [the loin] dries out easily unless care is taken to provent it from overcooking. Its taste and texture are vastly improved by brining, and we recommend you routinely add this preparation step when cooking any piece of pork loin... Don't confuse [the pork tenderloin] with the pork loin, despite the similarity of their names. Cut from the interior side of the rib bone along the lower and middle back, the tenderloin corresponds to the fillet from the beef."

zally_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #10 of 24)

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This is getting curiouser and curiouser! Last nite when I first read your post Dixie, I googled on Armour Meats and found http://www.freshpork.com/allabout/cuts/loin.htm,

At that time they had this fillet listed under the boneless loin category but the page wasn't available. But when I looked just now the listing has disappeared! I think it is definately a marketing cut designed to mislead.

BTW, their description of pork tenderloin states that it contains up to 10% water and salt solution "to enhance tenderness" or some such drivel. Pork tenderloin needs brining?? I don't think so. But it sure adds weight and $$

Jean_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #11 of 24)

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Looks to me like they cross cut a loin (like you can buy ham slices)
and doctored them up with some spices/herbs/sauces/whatever and are selling them for twice what they should. See where the add says 4 varieties, seasoned blah blah blah?

EM_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #12 of 24)

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I buy this cut all the time here and it is exactly as Gretchen said, loin that has been sliced. I use it for picatta, quick saute in butter, etc. It is not tenderloin!

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #13 of 24)

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I occasionally see boneless loin chops (often they are smoked). I would think of this cut as a long strip of very lean meat. It actually looks pretty handy.

I'm intrigued by the "comes in four flavors" that Jean picked up. Perhaps they've already brined it for you? Handy, but of course you'd expect to pay more for that.

You could cut it into cubes and make a braised dish, such as the pork in milk that samchang posted last week, or cut it into slices and make pork-chop type quick saute dishes out of it. Just don't cook it too long.

WDSM's picture

(post #58643, reply #14 of 24)

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M-L save your money. Four flavors are crap. Have tasted teriyaki, lemon peppercorn and mesquite and are so strong they are inedible.

MadMom_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #15 of 24)

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wdsm - how right you are! don't think i've tried them all, but what i did try was horrid. pork is so easy to marinate, flavor, etc. that it is stupid to pay for someone else's idea of rancid overdone flavor.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #16 of 24)

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The ones I actually saw in Albertson's store said "original" - no marinade at all. I would think marinated ones would be exceptionally strong. No telling how long in the solution. I am going to stick with center cut boneless loin and tenderloins - at least I know what they are.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #17 of 24)

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Here is message received from Hormel after inquiry to them.

....The Pork Tenderloin is the strip of meat which consists of a large internal
muscle of the loin on
each side of the vertebral column. Our tenderloins are packaged 2 per
package and available in
Teriyaki and Peppercorn.

The Pork Loin Filet is the premium cut of the pork loin. Hormel Foods
offers 5 flavors. These
include the Mesquite BBQ, Lemon Garlic, Honey Mustard, Salsa and Original...

Glenys_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #18 of 24)

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So after all that, the advertisers were just calling the familiar tenderloin a fillet. I looked at those marinated things at Safeway (only Safeway here would carry something like that!) What a bunch of trash in the ingredient list- frightening!

Jean_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #19 of 24)

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No, "Pork Loin Filet is the premium cut of the pork loin" not tenderloin!!

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #20 of 24)

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Right on--I bet they just cut the half loin in half again and did their deed of marinating-chemicalating.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #21 of 24)

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Yeah, and if you understand this "premium cut of pork loin" good for you, I don't. This little explanation was just a cut above nothing in my opinion. Still think it is just a marketing ploy.

EM_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #22 of 24)

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It's definitely a marketing ploy, but if it is boneless and lean, it is a filet.

Grasshopper_'s picture

(post #58643, reply #23 of 24)

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I make boneless pork loin with a specific recipe quite a bit and it doesn't dry out at all. It's delicious. Is that the cut someone said dries out?

Full-fledged's picture

(post #58643, reply #24 of 24)

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I checked this out at Albertson's too. It looks smaller in diameter than the regular loin.

Loin Language

Fledge