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working with pre-cooked shrimp

PauHana's picture

A friend really likes Costco's frozen Island Lime Shrimp


He recently bought several pounds of shelled, frozen pre-cooked shrimp & asked if I could duplicate that taste.  I found this recipe that looks very similar in taste but starts with uncooked shrimp:


Caribbean Shrimp in Lime Sauce, Flambeed with Rum #61100

Recipe from Spring/99 issue of Gusto Magazine, donated by Daniel et Daniel Catering, Toronto. I prepared this dish for a "Caribbean Theme", birthday barbeque for 20 guests, by adjusting the recipe, times 5. It worked very well, and was a popular dish. Because the recipe was increased, times five, it had to be cooked in two batches, using two skillets at a time, on the barbeque. Flambe on a barbeque presents a small challenge but it can be done. There were no leftovers

32
medium shrimp, peeled and deveined

 
salt and pepper

1
teaspoon finely chopped garlic

1/2
tablespoon minced fresh ginger

1
tablespoon vegetable oil

1/3
cup dark rum

2
limes, juice of

3/4
cup coconut milk, plus

2
tablespoons coconut milk

1/4
cup 35% cream

 
cayenne pepper

1/2
lime, zest of

15
leaves fresh coriander

1
tablespoon julienned red peppers
20 minutes 10 mins prep


  1. Season shrimp with salt and pepper.

  2. In a medium-heavy bottom skillet, over medium heat, saute shrimp, garlic and ginger in oil about 3 minutes, stirring constantly to ensure garlic and ginger do not burn.

  3. Add rum and flambe shrimp.

  4. Add lime juice and simmer about 1 minute.

  5. Remove shrimp from pan and set aside.

  6. Add coconut milk, 35% cream, cayenne pepper and lime zest to pan; bring to a boil.

  7. Reduce heat and simmer about 5 minutes, or until sauce thickens slightly.

  8. Return shrimp to pan until heated through.

  9. Do not allow sauce to boil.

  10. Adjust seasoning, if necessary.

  11. Garnish with coriander and red pepper.


I always work with uncooked shrimp, & am a bit clueless when it comes to the pre-cooked ones. 
Would I just add them at the last minute to warm through?
Would they benefit from a marinade in advance?
Anyone tried Costco's version & have a better recipe (using pre-cooked)?


TIA!


Hmm… I wonder if they meant to write:
¼ tsp of cayenne pepper instead of ¼ lb ?
Oh well – too late to worry about it now !

 

Who is Luke?
and
Why is his warm water
better than any other brand?

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30939, reply #1 of 22)

I think I sampled these recently and they really are pretty good.  I can't remember the price but I didn't think it was outrageous. 
I think you might be able to just quickly turn the shrimp in the garlic, etc. with no heat, heat a bit and flambe and add the lime juice. Then just proceed with the recipe.


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
PauHana's picture

(post #30939, reply #2 of 22)

Thanks Gretchen,


That makes perfect sense to me.  I plan to try it for a quick dinner party Fri. nite.


Hmm… I wonder if they meant to write:
¼ tsp of cayenne pepper instead of ¼ lb ?
Oh well – too late to worry about it now !

 

Who is Luke?
and
Why is his warm water
better than any other brand?

 

SallyBR1's picture

(post #30939, reply #6 of 22)

That is interesting.... I never bought them because I thought they would get tough no matter what

I always buy the uncooked.

Maybe I'll give them a try

Adele's picture

(post #30939, reply #7 of 22)

I've never bought cooked, why start?

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #30939, reply #8 of 22)

I only buy cooked for shrimp cocktail and shrimp salad. :-) Great for quick dinners, especially when I get home from work at 10 pm.


(Note to self: get a new job)


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

SallyBR1's picture

(post #30939, reply #9 of 22)

Could be good for those vietnamese Summer rolls.... :-)

TracyK's picture

(post #30939, reply #10 of 22)

Do you know that I am such an idiot that I never even thought about using pre-cooked shrimp in those? Duh. I could make those REALLY quickly after work... especially if I just use hoisin (thinned with a little fish sauce) for dipping. I just bought some more rice papers, too... I want to make crispy spring rolls this weekend (or may just go out to my favorite vietnamese restaurant).

Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Risottogirl's picture

(post #30939, reply #12 of 22)

I use the raw frozen kind more frequently,  but I like to keep a bag of the cooked on hand for salads, topping gazpacho and for summer rolls. Especially in the summer. If it ever arrives.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

TracyK's picture

(post #30939, reply #13 of 22)

Same here. :-)


And... bite your tongue!! Here in the swampland of DC, we are enjoying the most lovely extended ACTUAL spring that I have ever experienced... it is just glorious. We usually get two days of cool weather and then tilt directly to 97 degrees and 800% humidity.


Of course I've just jinxed it by posting this, LOL.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Lexi's picture

(post #30939, reply #11 of 22)

I hesitated to buy them at first, thinking they might be mushy or overcooked and tough, but they aren't.  They're really convenient to have on hand when you don't have time to cook, or when you just don't feel like it.  Actually, unless you're cooking shrimp in a seasoned boil where the flavor is important, or you're lucky enough to find some that have not been previously frozen, I don't see why anyone wanting shrimp for a cold dish would prefer to cook and clean them instead of using the already cleaned, frozen shrimp.  You can add them to any cold dish, including summer rolls, or just serve a bowl with your favorite dipping sauces as an appetizer.  I recently bought large, cooked, peeled Key West pinks for things like shrimp salade nicoise or shrimp, avocado and citrus salad.  I bought smaller ones to add to orzo or rice salads.  At 9.99 a pound (a once-a-year-sale), the large ones were a real bargain.  If you're careful not to overcook them, you can add them to a hot dish too. 

 

 

Adele's picture

(post #30939, reply #15 of 22)

I think my reasoning is that I frequently buy shrimp, just never entered my mind to buy cooked/frozen.  I do see the ease of it though.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #30939, reply #17 of 22)

I rarely buy shrimp that aren't frozen. In my area at least, they're usually fresher than most "fresh" shrimp, 95% of which have already been frozen and are then thawed for sale. At least this way I have control over how -- and how long--  they are thawed before I use them. They thaw so quickly (a few minutes in cold water) that they're just as convenient as non-frozen, and often more so because they're already deveined (though I do stick with shell-on).


I buy frozen raw shrimp far more often than frozen cooked, but as I said, those are perfect for shrimp cocktail and shrimp salad.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Gretchen's picture

(post #30939, reply #19 of 22)

Sorry, didn't read your post before mine--agree, obviously.


Costco and Sam's have bags of cooked shrimp that are quite good. They are definitely not overcooked in my experience, my number one thing.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Lexi's picture

(post #30939, reply #3 of 22)

I often buy frozen, precooked shrimp during the summer months to have on hand for cold salads or to put out with drinks.  I sometimes add them to a hot dish or pasta sauce.  I suggest you add them just before you flambe; add the lime juice, but don't cook them longer than it takes to heat through, or they will be tough.  Looks like a delicious dish. 

 

 

KarenP's picture

(post #30939, reply #4 of 22)

The sauce with this coconut shrimp is simple, good, similar to what you're trying to recreate.


              Coconut Shrimp with Banana Lime Dipping Sauce


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  2             pounds  21 -26 or larger tail on peeled deveined shrimp
  3 1/2           cups  oil for frying
                        beer batter
  3               cups  all purpose flour, 1 cup set aside
  4               cups  sweetened coconut flakes -- divided ito 4 1 cup piles
  2          teaspoons  salt
  2          teaspoons  paprika
  2          teaspoons  black pepper
  1         tablespoon  whole oregano
  1         tablespoon  whole thyme
  3         -5 bottles  beer
                        sauce
  1                can  coconut cream coco lopez brand
  2                 -3  bananas
  1                 -2  limes -- juiced
  1              bunch  cilantro


Beer Batter


Blend all ingredients until incorporated and the consistency of pancake batter


refrigerate 30 minutes before using


SAUCE


Blend all ingredients in a food processor or blender until smooth, refrigerate


Shrimp


Preheat oil to 350 degrees


Dip 4 shrimp in reserved flour tamping off excess


then dip in  beer batter


coat in coconut


fry for 2 -3 minutes


remove from oil to a paper towel


continue until all shrimp are cooked


Serve with sauce

PauHana's picture

(post #30939, reply #5 of 22)

Thanks Karen,


That sauce looks worth a try - unfortunately, the Coco Lopez would be an hour's drive each way, so I'll give the original a try.  (But it's on my list.)


Note to anyone else looking at Karen's post, I think the recipe software did some mis-calculations.  (Happens with mine all too often.)  Proceed carefully.


Note to Lee:


Since you confirmed what Glenys posted, that means double-courage for me.  Thanx!


 


Hmm… I wonder if they meant to write:
¼ tsp of cayenne pepper instead of ¼ lb ?
Oh well – too late to worry about it now !

 

Who is Luke?
and
Why is his warm water
better than any other brand?

 

wisekaren's picture

(post #30939, reply #14 of 22)

This reminds me of another pet peeve re cookbook terminology (apropos of the de- thread last month). Why call it "precooked" and not just "cooked"? Why do we "preheat" the oven instead of just "heat" it? And so on. It's not just in cookbooks, though: Why do we "pre-address" envelopes and "pre-register" for classes, and why was this show "pre-recorded"?? Makes me crazy.
Sorry.
Karen

Heather's picture

(post #30939, reply #16 of 22)

I'm doing a party on Sunday afternoon and need one more dish for the appetizer buffet but I'm really short on prep time that day. I was thinking of getting some of these cooked shrimp and marinating them or making a dipping sauce. Does anyone have a great recipe?

Gretchen's picture

(post #30939, reply #18 of 22)

I posted a good pickled shrimp recipe a couple of weeks ago. It is a bit different from the norm.


As for the cooked shrimp, they are very handy to have for cold shrimp.  And unless you live at the beach where the shrimp boats actually arrive at the dock, the chances you are eating "fresh, not frozen" shrimp are very remote.  In fact, they would be less than savory after the time spent on the boat, getting to market, etc.
On Ming's show this past week-end, his "fish monger" was talking about that--and the fact he preferred farm raised.  They showed the little thingy that is used to split the shell and clean the shrimp.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Heather's picture

(post #30939, reply #20 of 22)

Thanks Gretchen, I found it and I've printed it off. I can make the marinade the day before and pop the shrimp in it in the morning. Sounds perfect.

Lexi's picture

(post #30939, reply #21 of 22)

They showed the little thingy that is used to split the shell and clean the shrimp.


I didn't see Ming's show, but I've tried (and thrown away) a number of the little thingies that are touted to peel and devein shrimp quickly.   Most tear up the shrimp in the process.  A friend recommended one that is carried by SLT.  Next time I'm there, I'm going to buy it and give it a try.  She claims it really works. 


 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30939, reply #22 of 22)

No, not that one. There is one that is good (although not everyone agrees, of course). It costs about a dollar and is a plastic handle that curves on up  to a thinnish blunt "point".  We have had this discussion before but this is what the seafood markets at the beach use to devein shrimp. You put it in the vein and push straight up. The vein is either removed or is rinsed out.  Some shells may hang onto the handle but you don't have to get rid of them until you really want to.


The machine they were showing was a conveyor belt that the shrimp were placed into small slots, convex shell up. A knife slits the shell and the vein is rinsed out. These ore the "EZ peel shrimp".


Gretchen
Gretchen