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Amy's picture

Wow. For something so "normal" and so easy, this is absolutely DELICIOUS!

TracyK's picture

(post #39606, reply #1 of 34)

Yay! I am making it tomorrow. :-)


"The happy StairMaster president is on his way to a mansionette in Dallas, to be the decider of where to put the sofa."
                                                            --Garrison Keillor

Amy's picture

(post #39606, reply #3 of 34)

Fair warning: I couldn't quit picking at it, especially the crispy parts, and I ended up with an uncomfortable (but happy!) pork belly. Don't say I didn't warn you :)

Gretchen's picture

(post #39606, reply #4 of 34)

Of course you did. That is what slow cooked pork is for!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
teebee's picture

(post #39606, reply #2 of 34)

ITA It was excellent, even the second day.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39606, reply #5 of 34)

Wait til you try the ragout with soft polenta with the leftovers. it's almost better that the roast!

~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

TracyK's picture

(post #39606, reply #6 of 34)

Well, since I have a huge pile of leftover pork, I imagine I'll know what that tastes like in a couple days. :-)


GREAT recipe, btw. So simple, and so good. I added a few chunked potatoes with the carrots, onions & garlic.



"The happy StairMaster president is on his way to a mansionette in Dallas, to be the decider of where to put the sofa."
                                                            --Garrison Keillor

Sheri's picture

(post #39606, reply #7 of 34)

I agree! Funny, I sent an email to Amy telling her the exact same thing. :)

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39606, reply #8 of 34)

=) I'll admit to madmomming the recipe - I added the leftover veggies from the roast, as well as a couple italian squash.


And I didn't do the polenta on the stove top as I still have a scar on my foot from the first (and last) time I did it on the stove top. I nuked it.


~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

Risottogirl's picture

(post #39606, reply #9 of 34)

I always do polenta in the micro now. perfect every time.


It is the only thing I actually cook in there. Well it is also convection...I do use that.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Syrah's picture

(post #39606, reply #10 of 34)

It's a miracle. It means that Simon actually likes polenta now.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39606, reply #11 of 34)

it's just perfect cooked that way, isn't it? I love it.

~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

Marts's picture

(post #39606, reply #12 of 34)

Please tell me exactly how to do the polenta in the micro. I'm making the pork this weekend and will make the ragout sometime next week. I haven't gotten anyone in the house (besides me) to like polenta yet - maybe the micro method will change that.
Thanks!

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39606, reply #13 of 34)

not RisottoGirl, but here's Barbara Kafta's method, which I use.


Soft Polenta  


4 cups water


 3/4 cup coarse ground cornmeal


2 tsp. kosher salt


3 Tbsp. unsalted butter


1/8 tsp. freshly ground black pepper


1/4 cup softened Gorgonzola cheese or 1/4 cup additional butter


1. Combine water, cornmeal, and salt in 2-qt. souffle dish. Cook, uncovered, at 100% for 6 minutes. Stir well, cover loosely with paper toweling, and cook for 6 minutes more.


2. Remove from oven. Uncover and stir in butter, pepper and cheese (or additional butter). Let stand for 3 minutes. Serve hot.


Serves 8 as a side dish.


P.S.  It is not necessary to add the huge amount of butter and cheese at the end that Kafka suggests. I just use a tiny fraction--maybe 2 tsp. of butter--and it's just fine. I never bother measuring how much Gorgonzola I use--depends on how calorie-conscious we're being and how much is available--but just a little of that is fine, too, as is crumbled chevre.


~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

Marts's picture

(post #39606, reply #14 of 34)

Thanks! I used to have one of her cookbooks for the micro, but it is long gone. That sounds really easy and great.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39606, reply #15 of 34)

you're welcome!


sometimes, if I'm using a coarse ground meal, I find it needs a few minutes more in the MW. But it's perfect, everytime. and no burned feet!


~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

Syrah's picture

(post #39606, reply #21 of 34)

Parmesan works as cheese in it too.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

JanaBerry's picture

(post #39606, reply #16 of 34)

Does anyone know if this can be made with Pork Butt rather than Shoulder? My grocery store doesn't have the shoulder available.

TracyK's picture

(post #39606, reply #17 of 34)

You're in luck! Pork butt = shoulder.


"Butt" just refers to the butt end of the shoulder (think "butt" as in gun, not derriere). :-)



"The happy StairMaster president is on his way to a mansionette in Dallas, to be the decider of where to put the sofa."
                                                            --Garrison Keillor

JanaBerry's picture

(post #39606, reply #18 of 34)

Ah! Perfect! Thanks!

soupereasy's picture

(post #39606, reply #19 of 34)

Tracy, Madmommed the ragout with your 6 hr pork. Added some carrots, green beans and escarole.


Served on soft polenta, what can I say? :0


I had roasted off some plum toms, so used those as my tomato product.

ashleyd's picture

(post #39606, reply #22 of 34)

Isn't it called butt because it was packed in barrels (butts)?


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

TracyK's picture

(post #39606, reply #23 of 34)

I'm sure there are many reasons.


"The happy StairMaster president is on his way to a mansionette in Dallas, to be the decider of where to put the sofa."
                                                            --Garrison Keillor

ashleyd's picture

(post #39606, reply #24 of 34)

"In pre-revolutionary New England and into the Revolutionary War, some pork cuts (not those highly valued, or "high on the hog," like loin and ham) were packed into casks or barrels (also known as "butts") for storage and shipment. The way the hog shoulder was cut in the Boston area became known in other regions as "Boston Butt." This name stuck and today, Boston butt is called that almost everywhere in the US,… except in Boston"


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Marts's picture

(post #39606, reply #25 of 34)

OK so I made the Roast Pork yesterday - it was a bit salty for me! I followed the recipe exactly - I used Morton's kosher salt for the rub and it sat in the fridge overnight Saturday night. I still loved it, but I would definitely cut back on the salt next time. Is Morton's kosher saltier than other kosher salts? Is there a different brand I should have used? Perhaps I am just more sensitive to the saltiness, but usually that is not a problem for me. I like salt.

Marcia's picture

(post #39606, reply #27 of 34)

I know that Morton's kosher salt has different shaped crystals than Diamond kosher salt, and believe, but am not sure, that you need less to equal the same amount. That may well have been your problem.

bonnieruth's picture

(post #39606, reply #28 of 34)

I have marinade recipes that call for either one cup of Diamond Crystal kosher salt, 3/4 cup of Morton's kosher salt, or 1/2 cup of table salt.  So apparently the Morton's does make it more salty.

kathymcmo's picture

(post #39606, reply #29 of 34)

There was a thread a while back, and Marie Louise did post some info to that effect, Morton's is saltier, measure for measure. I recently switched to Diamond and noticed that I need to add a little more than I was adding with Morton's. The Diamond grains also seem a bit smaller.

bonnieruth's picture

(post #39606, reply #31 of 34)

I would like to use Diamond's instead of Mortons but recently can't find it in large boxes.  I balk at buying the more expensive smaller sizes.  Is anyone else having this problem?

kathymcmo's picture

(post #39606, reply #32 of 34)

I got the big one a month or so ago, but it was from my little specialty grocery, not the larger grocery store I go to for staples. Haven't looked there but will check next weekend to see if they carry it.

bonnieruth's picture

(post #39606, reply #33 of 34)

I'd like to hear what you find out.  I've been wondering if it is just the stores around here that for some reason stopped carrying the larger size, or if they aren't being packaged anymore.