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Got the new issue: Summer Rolls rule!

SallyBR1's picture

am I the first this time?????


Could not believe when I saw the magazine in my mailbox yesterday - the Spring rolls article is perfect, I am already making the shrimp version for lunch


 


 Will browse the rest of the magazine (that seems like another winner issue) this afternoon


 


(did I make some of you jealous or what????)


 


 

Jean's picture

(post #38844, reply #1 of 86)

Yeah, me.  I've always wanted to try making them, but I'll have to wait until I get my bound volume.. Something to look forward to, eh?

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #38844, reply #2 of 86)

Jean, I have a few good recipes for various rolled things... cajun egg rolls, pork & prune dumplings (sounds weird but these are SO good), I also have one for a soft shrimp roll and a crispy chicken spring roll.  the first two are posted at Z, but I'm happy post the other two if you want them!

Jean's picture

(post #38844, reply #5 of 86)

I'll check over at Z, but will  you post the others too, Please & Thank you.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #11 of 86)

Jean I have a big article printed from the Washington Post that I have used. I'll try to send it to you.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #38844, reply #15 of 86)

That would be great!! Thanks.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #19 of 86)

Well, darn. I went to my file but it has somehow morphed into an AOL link.  I have my recipes saved on a disk and maybe it will still be correct on that.  I tried to search here because I am pretty sure I posted it one time but no luck.  I shall try, however.  Might you want to get this one issue and give it to your daughter or granddaughter after looking at it?

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #23 of 86)

Well, I did find it on a disk so now have it back for me too. It is a long article and the gaps are for illustrations that didn't come through. I have tried to compact it a little. Hope it helps.  The first ones I made were really good and pretty. The next time I didn't allow enough time to take a bit of time with them so they wern't as pretty--but still good. I LOVE them.  enjoy!!


Summer RollsRenee Comet/Styled by Lisa Cherkasky --


Pull the edges of 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock to the center of the wrapper (above). Then, keeping the ingredients tight in the wrapper, roll the bundle up to 12 o'clock (below). Don't let he ingredients become lopsided as you roll.


Imagining the wrapper as a clock face, place filling just above 6 o'clock. Then pull 6 o'clock up over the pile of food and tuck it in tight under the mixture.



By Brian Patterson
Special to The Washington Post
Wednesday, August 8, 2001; Page F01


A summer roll should be a self-contained study in textures and flavors, a complete appetizer packed in a four-bite edible package. At its best, the traditional Vietnamese delicacy, goi cuon, is a gossamer rice-paper wrapper (banh trang) folded around poached shrimp and pork with shredded lettuce, cellophane noodles and fresh cilantro or herbs, usually served with a peanut-based dipping sauce.


However, if it falls into the wrong hands, a summer roll -- also known as a salad roll or garden roll -- can be a rubbery wrapper stuffed with too many noodles and a few chewy nuggets of poached pork and shrimp -- a noodle-filled vehicle used only to convey dipping sauce to your mouth.


To make a perfect summer roll, whether traditional or of your own innovation, it is important to understand -- and perfect -- each of its parts.


The rice paper sets the summer roll apart from its deep-fried siblings, the spring roll or the egg roll. Silky and supple in texture, translucent in appearance, rice paper is made by hand in Vietnam. Fine rice flour is mixed with salt and water; the resulting paste is smeared into thin sheets that are steamed for a few seconds, then left on bamboo mats in the sun to dry. As the paste dries, the bamboo mats leave a distinctive cross-hatch pattern on the thin, brittle wafers. The wrappers need only be dipped in tepid water for at least 10 seconds to rehydrate them enough to make them pliable. Then they should be used right away. The thinner the rice paper the more fragile and challenging it is to handle when rolling.


Dried bean-thread or cellophane noodles (also known as glass noodles) are commonly used in a summer roll. They have a lot of surface area that can hold plenty of flavor and moisture and may be dressed with vinegars and oils, or they can merely pick up the juices of the meats and vegetables nestled against them in the summer roll. Cellophane noodles are firm and supple, yet yield easily to a bite without being chewy.


One of the joys of summer rolls is that the vegetables you use can be barely sauteed, steamed lightly or left raw and finely shredded. Raw leafy greens may be shredded as well as carrots, beets, cucumbers or other vegetables. Firm vegetables such as carrots or the outer part of zucchini and other squash may also be cut into a fine julienne and sauteed so that they are both tender and spaghetti-like. Tender julienned or shredded shapes ensure that what does not get bitten off in the first bite stays behind in the rest of the roll.


Herbs such as a leaf or sprig of basil or cilantro can show through the translucent wrapper if you add it at the last stage of rolling. If several varieties of summer rolls are served on the same platter, you may flag each kind with a different herb showing through the rice paper. For example, shrimp rolls may show a basil leaf, pork may bear a cilantro leaf, and crab may have a chive or chervil leaf.


Once you've learned the basics of the classic Vietnamese summer roll, try your own innovations. Marinate and then grill shrimp or pork and mix them with noodles and sauteed vegetables dressed in soy, ginger and hot bean paste. Or make a vegetarian version of bean sprouts, shredded mesclun greens, grated carrots, beets and sweet potatoes, chopped fresh tender herbs and ground peanuts.


Whatever the contents, you can assemble your rolls in one of two ways. Combine all of the ingredients in a tossed salad, put the mixture on the softened rice paper and roll it up. Or construct them more traditionally by gathering around you the ingredients and adding them in specific proportions to the rice paper.


Remember that the sooner you can eat a summer roll after it has been assembled, the better. If you have the luxury of eating them just moments after you roll them, then dress the noodles and vegetables first, before you roll them up, so that most of the dipping sauce is actually contained within the roll.


Slice the summer roll in half at a slight angle so that the cross-section will show off the colors and textures within and serve it on a platter or plate lined with lettuce leaves.


Find your local Asian market and buy a few packages of rice-paper wrappers, some cellophane noodles and a few interesting jars of hot bean paste with chilies. Follow the three variations on the Vietnamese summer roll here or play with some leftover salmon or rotisserie chicken. Use them as is or as inspiration, mixing and matching the rolls with the dipping sauces.


Pork-Bean Thread Summer Rolls


(Makes 24 rolls)


The traditional Vietnamese summer roll consists of poached pork and shrimp and is served with with a thin peanut dipping sauce. This spicier rendition pairs nicely with the Peanut Dipping Sauce, though if you prefer something to tone down the heat, it also takes well to the Sweet and Sour Dipping Sauce.


For the marinated pork:


2 pork tenderloins (1 to 1 1/4 pounds total), very thinly sliced
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon black bean-chili sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons chili paste, such as sambal olek* (optional)
About 1 tablespoon vegetable oil


For the noodles:


8 to 12 ounces dried bean thread or cellophane noodles
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon soy sauce


For the rolls:


At least 24 rice-paper wrappers
4 carrots, peeled and julienned
8 leaves napa cabbage, julienned
25 to 50 leaves Thai basil* (may substitute basil, mint or cilantro)


For the pork: Place the pork in the freezer for 30 minutes to make it easier to slice. Using a sharp knife, cut the pork as thinly as possible, being sure to cut at least 24 slices.


In a large bowl, combine the oyster, hoisin, bean and soy sauces and chili paste. Add the pork; toss to coat. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or preferably overnight.


Place a colander over a shallow dish. In a wok or saute pan over medium-high heat, heat 1/2 tablespoon of the oil until hot but not smoking. Wipe marinade from pork slices and discard marinade. Using tongs, transfer half of the pork slices to the skillet. Cook the pork, turning once, until browned and cooked through, about 1 minute per side, depending on the thickness. Transfer the pork and any liquid in the pan to the colander and let the juices run through to the dish beneath. Add remaining 1/2 tablespoon oil to pan. Repeat procedure, cooking the remaining pork and adding it and its pan juices to pork already in the colander.


Transfer the cooled pork to a bowl and refrigerate. Reserve the juices in the dish under the colander.


For the noodles: Place the noodles in a large bowl and add lukewarm water to cover. Set aside to soak until they soften, 10 to 15 minutes.


Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drain the noodles, add them to the boiling water and cook for 10 to 15 seconds. Immediately drain, rinse with cold water and drain again, shaking to remove any excess water. Set aside to drain and cool completely.


Toss the cooled noodles with the reserved pork cooking juices. Add the vinegar and soy sauce and toss to coat. Set aside at room temperature.


For the rolls: Cover a work surface with clean cotton towels. Have ready a tray or platter also covered with a towel and a shallow bowl or pie plate -- larger in diameter than the wrappers -- filled about 2/3 full with warm water. (As the water cools, you will have to replenish it.)


Dip 1 wrapper at a time in the warm water. When the stiffness is gone, about 10 seconds, depending on the thickness, remove it from the water and carefully place it on the towel, taking care that the ends do not fold under or become crimped.


Place 1 slice pork, about 1 tablespoon of noodles and 1 tablespoon of carrots and cabbage on the wrapper about 1 inch from the bottom. Roll tightly (see photographs below). Just before the last roll, place 1 or 2 basil leaves on the bundle and finish rolling. Transfer the finished roll to the tray, seam-side down. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. Serve immediately.


* Note: Thai basil is milder than holy basil and has purple stems and flowers It can be found at some Asian Markets.
** Note: Sambal oelek is an Indonesian paste of chili peppers, brown sugar and salt that is available at most Indonesian or Asian markets and some specialty markets.


Grilled Shrimp Summer Rolls

(Makes 24 rolls)
You could use any spicy or citrus-based marinade for the shrimp. These rolls work equally well with any of the dipping sauces.
For the shrimp:
1 pound large shrimp (at least 24), peeled and deveined
1 teaspoon hot chili pepper oil
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon shrimp paste* (optional)

For the noodles:
About 6 ounces dried bean thread or cellophane noodles

For the vegetables:

2 yellow squash, scrubbed but not peeled
2 zucchini, scrubbed but not peeled
2 carrots, peeled
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar

For the rolls:


At least 24 rice-paper wrappers
25 to 50 Thai basil leaves** (may substitute basil, mint or cilantro)


For the shrimp: In a large bowl, combine the shrimp, hot oil, soy sauce and, if using, shrimp paste. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.


Preheat the grill or broiler. Transfer the shrimp to the grill or broiler, discarding the marinade and grill or broil, turning once, until pink and cooked through, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate to cool.


For the noodles:
Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. In a large bowl, cover the noodles with cold water and soak until they soften, 10 to 15 minutes. Drain, add to the boiling water and cook for 10 to 15 seconds. Drain again, shaking them well to remove any excess water; set aside to cool completely.


For the vegetables:
Using only the outermost 1/4 inch of each vegetable, slice the yellow squash, zucchini and carrots into matchstick-size slices; set aside. (Reserve the remaining portions of the vegetables for another use.)


In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil. Add the carrots and saute for 1 minute. Add the squashes and saute until they just begin to soften, about 2 minutes. Add the soy sauce and vinegar, bring the mixture to a simmer and cook for 2 minutes. Transfer the vegetable mixture to a bowl; set aside to cool.


For the rolls:
Following the instructions in the first recipe, soften rice-paper wrapper. Place 1 or 2 shrimp, about 1 tablespoon of noodles and 2 tablespoons of vegetables on wrapper about 1 inch above the bottom. Roll tightly (see photographs below). Just before the last roll, place 1 or 2 basil leaves on the bundle and finish rolling. Transfer the finished roll to the tray, seam-side down. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. Serve immediately.
* Note: Shrimp paste is a mixture of finely chopped salted, fermented shrimp. It imparts a fishy flavor; may substitute anchovy paste or a few dashes fish sauce.** Note: See first recipe.


Crab-Avocado-Corn Summer Rolls

(Makes 24 rolls)
The crab offers a mellow sweetness to this roll. Given crab's sometimes outrageous price tag, you may wish to substitute cooked shrimp, chicken or even lobster. The corn may initially sound out of place, but it adds a crisp texture. Look for a mango that gives only slightly to firm pressure or it will be too ripe and juicy to dice.

For the noodles:


About 8 ounces dried bean thread or cellophane noodles
Juice from 1 lime
1 jalapeno chili, seeded and diced


For the rolls:


At least 24 rice-paper wrappers
8 to 16 ounces lump crab meat, picked over
1 mango, peeled and diced
1 avocado, peeled and diced
About 1 cup corn kernels or from 1 ear of corn, toasted* (may substitute cooked corn)
2 chives, minced, plus additional cut into 1-inch lengths for garnish
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste


For the noodles:
Place the noodles in a large bowl and add enough lukewarm water to cover. Set aside to soak until they soften considerably, 10 to 15 minutes.


Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drain the noodles, add them to the boiling water for 10 to 15 seconds. Immediately drain, rinse with cold water and drain again, shaking to remove any excess water. Set aside to drain and cool completely.


Toss the cooled noodles with the lime juice and jalapeno and toss to coat. Set aside at room temperature.


For the rolls:
Following the instructions in the first recipe, soften the rice-paper wrappers. Place about 1 tablespoon of noodles, 1 tablespoon of crab, some mango, avocado, corn, minced chives and salt and pepper to taste on the wrapper about 1 inch above the bottom. Roll tightly (see photograps below). Just before the last roll, place a couple of lengths of chives on the bundle and finish rolling. Transfer the finished roll to the tray, seam-side down. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. Serve immediately.


* Note: Remove husk and silk from ear and grill or broil, turning frequently, until lightly toasted. Cool slightly. Place cob on end and, using a sharp knife, slice off the kernels.


Peanut Dipping Sauce

(Makes about 1 cup)
This is a spicy rendition of the traditional summer roll dipping sauce. It may be thinned down with additional coconut milk or, for calorie counters, water.

1 cup chopped roasted peanuts, preferably unsalted
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1 tablespoon sambal oelek* or other chili paste or hot sauce, or to taste
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1/2 cup coconut milk
1 teaspoon minced lemon grass (may substitute fresh-squeezed lemon juice) (optional)
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
Salt to taste


In a food processor or blender, process all of the ingredients. Add additional coconut milk or water to achieve the desired consistency. (May cover and refrigerate for several hours; sauce will thicken.)
* Note: See first recipe.


Soy Ginger Sauce

makes about 1/2 cup)
A sauce for those who just cannot imagine a summer roll without a soy dipping sauce. Make it mild or spicy by altering the amount of chili peppers and chili paste.

1/2 cup light soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced ginger root
1/2 tablespoon minced garlic
1/2 tablespoon minced, seeded jalapeno chili pepper, or to taste
1 tablespoon minced Thai basil* (may substitute basil or cilantro)
1 scallion (white and light green parts), thinly sliced
1 teaspoon hot bean paste or chili sauce with beans (optional)


In a small bowl, combine all of the ingredients. (May cover and refrigerate overnight.)
* Note: See first recipe.


Sweet and Sour Dipping Sauce

(Makes about 1 1/2 cups)


This versatile sauce -- sweet and tart, light not heavy -- counters the heat from anything spicy and makes an able accompaniment to seafood. Pineapple juice is typically available only in very large containers; you can also use the juice from a 15-ounce can of crushed pineapple


1/2 cup pineapple juice
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 cup light soy sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
3 tablespoons dry sherry or orange juice
2 tablespoons cornstarch


In a food processor or blender, process all of the ingredients. Pour the sauce into a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat; set aside to cool.


Per 1-tablespoon serving: 31 calories, trace protein, 7 gm carbohydrates, trace fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 177 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber


Brian Patterson teaches the pairing of food and wine at L'Academie de Cuisine. He is also executive chef for the American Medical Association.



Gretchen

Edited 5/1/2005 1:04 pm ET by GRETCHEN


Edited 5/1/2005 1:05 pm ET by GRETCHEN

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #38844, reply #24 of 86)

Thank you, thank you.  That is terrific. Saved and printing off a hard copy as we 'speak'.  I can't remember where I saw it, but some publication had photos of spring rolls with small sprigs of flat parsley peeking through the rice paper. Soo very pretty!

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #25 of 86)

Yes, these did that with basil leaves.  Also when you put the shrimp in them, you split the shrimp in half and put them to the outside of the wrapper so they show through.  It really does not take so much of the noodles. I think the first time I made them I posted that I had a LOT of noodles left over.  Samchang answered that it doesn't take much.  The amount in that recipe might be for ALL the rolls, not just one--I don't know.  But then, they aren't expensive either.  Serve leftovers with Aussie's peanut lime vinaigrette--which would also be a good dipping sauce.


I was glad to ressurect it for myself.  Enjoy.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Meryl's picture

(post #38844, reply #26 of 86)

Speaking of Aussie, have you heard from her? I haven't seen her here in a long, long time.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #27 of 86)

No, I asked the same question a few weeks ago.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #38844, reply #28 of 86)

Gretchen, I tried to email you, but it was returned...can you email me via Taunton?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #38844, reply #29 of 86)

Just did. Don't know why it didn't go through. It wasn't even in my spam folder.


Gretchen


Gretchen
Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #38844, reply #30 of 86)

For dinner tonight I made the Green Bean Salad with Corn, Cherry Tomatoes & Basil.  Only I didn't have cherry tomatoes, so I used vine ripened and chopped them up.  This was very pretty, with all the colors, didn't have red onion, but I used purple basil, as well as green.  It said to add the basil and the dressing and mix up, but I just picked enough basil for tonight and drizzeled the dressing on my plate, so the leftovers will still look good tomorrow and I can pick more basil.


To go with, I made a potato salad and the Saucy Chicken Wings, only I used legs and baked instead of grilled (rainy yucky outside).  Guess it was the sauces I was really after, made two.  :) The Buffalo-Style Sauce with Rosemary & Lemon, I used Texas Pete hotsauce as that is my fav, the authors fav is Franks.  I usually mix the hot sauce and butter together, never thought of adding rosemary and lemon, very tasty.  Also did the Sweet & Sour Orange Glaze, which was nice & tangy without being too sweet.


Dessert was Sourcream Chocolate Bundt cake.  Oh my.  First time ever that I had a bundt cake actually come out of the pan in one piece.  Ta Da!  This is so moist and chocolaty.  I am loving it, too bad I'll be taking it into work, but I just can't, can't keep it here- the temptation will be too great.  (Plus, I made the triple chocolate cookies earlier- very rich, very good- Oink!)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Meryl's picture

(post #38844, reply #31 of 86)

Hey Adele, why don't you just freeze a few slices of the cake? Not that it's ever stopped me, but maybe you have more control than I do, and the fact that it's frozen will make it less tempting, ie, out of sight, out of mind? (a feeble attempt at a solution, I admit). Now why couldn't we love broccoli as much as chocolate?    


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst


Edited 5/2/2005 12:03 am ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Adele's picture

(post #38844, reply #32 of 86)

Welllllll, as I was looking at it this morning, I cut off a good size slice before taking it to work  It's 9:37 and it's gone!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

courgette's picture

(post #38844, reply #33 of 86)

Cake for breakfast-yum!

PeterDurand's picture

(post #38844, reply #3 of 86)

Ok, ok. Just because SOME of us don't get it until the third week of May...

 

MadMom's picture

(post #38844, reply #4 of 86)

You must be the first...at least the first to post it.  I'm jealous...but then, I'm never first.  At least, I'm never last, either.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #38844, reply #6 of 86)

The spring roll article was perfect timing for me, too.  Just last night, DH and I struggled to make spring rolls rolls from Rick Bayless's book.  Even though I had made them years ago, I had a terrible time last night.  Well, it doesn't help that all my rice papers had slits in the middle!  In addition, I was trying to add too much filling.  These pictures will really help.  I used leftover poached salmon, which worked quite well, and the pink color of the salmon was asthetically pleasing.  We've decided to master these, since they are easily adaptable to many leftover ingredients.


I love the cover of this latest issue.  The red and purple with the green beans makes it really come alive.  Now, I'm ready to search out the Evo on pg. 13.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #38844, reply #18 of 86)

I had the same problem - my first Spring roll was perfect, then the next three had slits in the middle that were hard to deal with


Which brand did you get? I think I have to look for higher quality rice paper - mine were bought in Hawaii. Looking through the package, almost all of them have several slits in the middle.


(le sigh)


Apart from that, the recipe was great - I need some practice making the rolls, but the combination of flavors was perfect. I included tiny shreds of carrots in mine.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #38844, reply #21 of 86)

Here's a picture of the rice paper I used.  Now that I checked the package, the rest of them seems to look fine.  We'll see, because I'm planning to make these regularly throughout the summer.  They're really refreshing, and we love the texture of the glass noodles.  It's going to be fun to experiment with different fillings.  And, I love the geometric patters the author was able to achieve.  I haven't had time to completely ready the article, but DH has and has taken copious notes!  We're ready to go.


I have one of Nancie McDermott's books, and I'll be on the lookout for Quick and Easy Vietnamese.  Yikes, I see it won't be published until next spring!  Sheesh!

PreviewAttachmentSize
rice.jpg
rice.jpg38.64 KB
MadMom's picture

(post #38844, reply #22 of 86)

I took a class from Martha Holmberg, and she prepared some FC spring rolls.  When I get my new copy, I'll check the recipe, and if mine is different, will be glad to post it for an "alternative."  I do remember they were quite good...I need to think about making some more.  They're a wonderful summer dish.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

whatscooking's picture

(post #38844, reply #20 of 86)

Other than the problem with the rice paper, how did the rest of Rick Bayless' recipe work for you?  I've been eyeing that one, but I think now I'll start with the FC one.  There are the best summer snack  or light dinner.  And, like you said, a great way to use leftovers. 


This is off topic but I must ask if you've tried anything  from the Rick and Lanie book?  I want to do the potstickers, but alas haven't yet.  I once read that, when asked if he cooks mexican at home, Bayless said he likes to play around with asian flavors and specifically thai food at home. 


P.S. to all, I got mine here in Chicago on Friday. It is the perfect little present to get in the mail on Friday to start the weekend off right.  First in line is the Aidells' kabobs.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

doyenne's picture

(post #38844, reply #7 of 86)

Apart from the spring rolls, did you notice that there was a tip from  Chiffonade ?

 

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

MadMom's picture

(post #38844, reply #8 of 86)

No!  Was it about adding sugar to tomato sauce, LOL?  I miss her.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

RheaS's picture

(post #38844, reply #9 of 86)

It's not even at the local Barnes and Noble. I went there last night to specifically look for the newest FC.

Jean's picture

(post #38844, reply #10 of 86)

I think I'll order mine on line. Probably as cheap to pay the postage as it is to pay the gas to travel to the Big City.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ouzo's picture

(post #38844, reply #12 of 86)

I don't even have the new issue yet!!!  Anyone is Seattle have theirs yet?

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

Syrah's picture

(post #38844, reply #13 of 86)

How did I know that you started this thread before I clicked??? LOL

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie