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wine books...where to start...

CanadianCook's picture

I wouldn't say I'm the most ignorant wine lover, but I have certainly read more about food than wine and would like to read more of the latter.


Plus, I have a chapters gift card and don't want to be one of those people who never use their gift cards...


Any suggestions of good wine books that you've recently read, heard of...


Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -


Sage, January 2008


 

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -

Sage, January 2008

 

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #1 of 29)

I think you'd really like Andrea Immer's books.  They're invaluable for learning to taste and pair but the structure of her books and the information comes from her other hat as a chef.  Before you dig into cellaring, Bordeaux futures or malalactic fermentation, read the damn books.  She has three and they're all good; one is about everyday with wine, one cooking with wine and I forget the other. 


The other great source, which I would get on DVD, is watching Jancis Robinson's series from the BBC.  That's an education on wine from the vineyard.  And she has a great sense of humour.

CanadianCook's picture

(post #62913, reply #2 of 29)

thanks Glenys...not doing well tonight. pretty sudden. i'm going post in ipke...sorry...

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -


Sage, January 2008


 

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -

Sage, January 2008

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #62913, reply #3 of 29)

Glenys recommended Perfect Pairings by Evan Goldstein last year and I got it for DD and DS.  I really like it a lot. He wrote it with his mother who had a San Francisco restaurant. Beautiful book with lots of specific recommendations.

Gretchen

Gretchen
AJ12754's picture

(post #62913, reply #4 of 29)

I found that one at Home Goods I think for 50% off and it turns out to be one of my favorites of the year ...


I also bought What to Drink with What You Eat -- not as much fun to browse through but very helpful for me.


My husband -- who loves trying new wines and pairings --  read Wine for Dummies a few years back and thought it was very helpful.  In fact I've had good luck with all the Dummies books -- the one on WWII was very good.


The trouble today is that almost everyone is famous and almost no-one is interesting. (paraphrased Tina Brown)

Cave obdurationem cordis

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #6 of 29)

What to Drink with What You Eat is by the same authors as Culinary Artistry. I did class with the authors and I think the book is liberating, if not the best example of how diversely we eat and pair all forms of drink with food. Great book, and I've seen it at Winners as well.

AJ12754's picture

(post #62913, reply #14 of 29)

I loved Culinary Artistry and  I read before I ever did any real cooking other than of the most mundane variety -- it was inspiring -- showing that cooking was both a thoughtful and a passionate art.

The trouble today is that almost everyone is famous and almost no-one is interesting. (paraphrased Tina Brown)

Cave obdurationem cordis

ouzo's picture

(post #62913, reply #5 of 29)

Great suggestion - my library has it and I just ordered.


"The best tricks are the simplest and the simplest tricks are the oldest" -Simon the owl

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

DJ's picture

(post #62913, reply #7 of 29)

Kevin Zralys Windows on the World Wine Course is always a good book .

Democracy has to be more than two wolves and a sheep deciding on what to have for dinner-James Bovard

If you eat pasta and antipasta, are you still hungry?

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #8 of 29)

Yes, especially since he revises it fairly often. Rather bittersweet title isn't it?

Gretchen's picture

(post #62913, reply #9 of 29)

I just got the last one at Costco--about $15. He comes to our Food and Wine Week every time now--it's in May.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DJ's picture

(post #62913, reply #10 of 29)

Bittersweet, that it is.  Lost his co-workers and his life's work.


His appearances on the TVFN with Allen Richmond were rather entertaining.


 


Democracy has to be more than two wolves and a sheep deciding on what to have for dinner-James Bovard

If you eat pasta and antipasta, are you still hungry?

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #11 of 29)

Was Allen Richmond the fellow who used to do a roving restaurant thing with a blonde woman?

DJ's picture

(post #62913, reply #12 of 29)

Yes, it was.  That blonde was Donna Hanover, Rudy Guiliani's ex.


Democracy has to be more than two wolves and a sheep deciding on what to have for dinner-James Bovard


Edited 1/25/2008 5:04 pm by DJ

If you eat pasta and antipasta, are you still hungry?

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #13 of 29)

Actually, now that you mention it, I remember seeing her but it wasn't her with him when they came here.  Sadly she referred to us as Vancouver, British Canada.  Love that extensive knowledge of North American geography in a forty-ish woman in media.

Marcia's picture

(post #62913, reply #15 of 29)

It's Alan Richman and his co-host was Nina somebody, and she was blond. Donna Hanover hosted something with David Rosengarten.

Richman writes (or did) about food for GQ and his ex is the wine columunist for Food and Wine, Letty something, I think.

dorcast's picture

(post #62913, reply #16 of 29)

Good memory....
I think it was Nina Griscom - very "Page 6" NY socialite type.

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #17 of 29)

That's it!  I knew I'd read about her other places.  

dorcast's picture

(post #62913, reply #19 of 29)

Yes, a few high profiles divorces and affairs....the kind that involve divvying up lots of money.

Marcia's picture

(post #62913, reply #23 of 29)

I wonder what happened to her - it's been a long time since I've seen her picture. Griscom, that's right.

Good long term memory is what you mean -- short term is shot. lol

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #18 of 29)

Letty Teague, she's one of my monthly must-reads.  She actually acknowledges wines from Canada, and as Gretchen's offspring will attest, she's aware of our great wine instructors being in demand in the U.S.

Marcia's picture

(post #62913, reply #21 of 29)

Yes, I googled and THEN remembered, and I believe it's Lettie instead of Letty.

I used to read her but stopped receiving Food and Wine because they weren't able to send issues without perfumed strips. I should check -- that's probably changed and I like the magazine and Teague.

gmunger's picture

(post #62913, reply #24 of 29)

F&W has a pretty good website, and I think you can read the utterings of ol' Lefty there. She IS good.


Ditto for me with the subscription. Also too many Rolex and Lexus ads for my taste. And they were a bit too anxious to promote the latest trends, often at the expense of real food.


 


 As Napoleon is reputed to have said about champagne, “in victory you deserve it; in defeat you need it.”


 

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
Marcia's picture

(post #62913, reply #27 of 29)

You know I'd forgotten about all the high end watch ads, but you have that right.

As for the latest trends, while I might not want to try them, I rather like knowing what they are. It's a grave character flaw, I know. :)

DJ's picture

(post #62913, reply #20 of 29)

That's right.  Ancient history on TVFN.

Democracy has to be more than two wolves and a sheep deciding on what to have for dinner-James Bovard

If you eat pasta and antipasta, are you still hungry?

Marcia's picture

(post #62913, reply #22 of 29)

Ancient history, indeed, and the Food Network was actually fun and once in a while instructive.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #62913, reply #25 of 29)

I have many, but my favorite is Karen MacNeils The Wine Bible.  Could not do without it.  Great book, easy to read and good Index.  I also use Wine Spectator a lot...


Jim

Glenys's picture

(post #62913, reply #26 of 29)

Sadly the Wine Bible is seven years old and needs a serious update. It's still a reader-friendly reference on wine but the Australian section was poor when written and it misses the bio-dynamic changes in French viniculture, which is a huge part of todays market.
I still think it depends greatly on what the goal is in the study of wine, whether it's cellaring, tasting and quaffing, or food-driven pairing.


Edited 1/27/2008 5:48 pm by Glenys

CanadianCook's picture

(post #62913, reply #28 of 29)

I decided on Immer's first book and the World Atlas of Wine (?) Thanks for the recommendations.

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -


Sage, January 2008


 

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -

Sage, January 2008

 

gmunger's picture

(post #62913, reply #29 of 29)

Not all of Immer's pairings work for me, but I like her casual approach and she inspires me to think creatively.


GOOD to hear from you, btw! Hang tough, my friend. Sending you some positive energy.



 


 As Napoleon is reputed to have said about champagne, “in victory you deserve it; in defeat you need it.”


 


Edited 1/29/2008 11:27 am by gmunger

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.