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Well, I did it -

Biscuit's picture

I wasn't going to, but I did it anyway.


I didn't get any cookbooks this year for Christmas, and that is fine, really, but I really wanted these 3 books so I finally succumbed to temptation and to 40% off at Jessica's Biscuit and got them:



  • New England Soup Factory Cookbook:  More than 100 recipes from the Nations Best Purveyor of Fine Soups

  • Hot Drinks for Cold Nights:  Great Hot Chocolates, Tasty Teas and Cozy Coffee Drinks by Lianna Krissoff

  • Simple Italian Sandwiches:  Recipes from America's Favorite Panini Bar by Jennifer Denton, Jason Denton and Kathryn Kellinger

You know - even Amazon doesn't have 40% off AND free shipping.  Hard to pass that up on books you were going to buy anyway, you know???


Anyone have these books and what are your thoughts so far?


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

soupereasy's picture

(post #62905, reply #61 of 80)

So Biscuit, did you get the pannini book? Looking for more ideas.

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #62905, reply #33 of 80)

Is it possible to cut back on the amount of horseradish?  I love it, but if it is too strong, I am not sure that DH will like it.




 


Biscuit's picture

(post #62905, reply #37 of 80)

Yea, you can definitely cut it back.  I only made a half-batch, but still the amount was 2 tbl. of white horseradish.  Now, DH and I adore horseradish, but I was really a little leary of adding that much.  I did it anyway, and was worried, but cooking it seemed to mellow it out a lot.  It was DEFINITELY a main flavor with that much though, and we loved it, but if you wanted it more of an accent flavor, cut it in half.


I served it with the roast beef sandwiches in the back of the book as she suggested, and together they were really wonderful on a cold winter night.


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

bunnycook's picture

(post #62905, reply #35 of 80)

The vinegar helps break down the connective tissue and give you that lovely gelatinous mouth-feel.
Learned that one from my mom's "crockpot BBQ" recipe, a no-brainer if ever there was one--and delicious.

Slow simmered BBQ
3 lbs. beef brisket, shoulder, or chuck roast
1/2 cup water
3 Tbsp. vinegar
2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 tsp. cumin or chili powder
1 - 18 oz. bottle BBQ sauce

Trim fat from meat. Place meat in crockpot. Mix water, vinegar, W. sauce and cumin (or chili powder) and pour over meat. Set crockpot on low for 12 hours or overnight.
In morning, shred warm meat into a bowl, and mix BBQ sauce into meat until desired consistency attained.

We have used beef, pork and chicken in this recipe, and it all turned out great. (the chicken used less time of course.) I prefer the cumin, my mom likes the chili powder version. It's good for feeding crowds and for hot summer days when you can sit it on the back porch.
--Bunny

Gretchen's picture

(post #62905, reply #43 of 80)

This is a bit like the easy BBQ brisket I do.  Layer of onion, big piece of brisket, bottle of beer, bottle of BBQ sauce. Cook 8-10 hours. Shred and add to the sauce. I concentrate the sauce a bit before adding it back.


It's probably the long slow cooking that does the tenderizing breaking down more than the vinegar.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #62905, reply #36 of 80)

OK, I'm sorry, but could you outline this soup for me--I think I NEED a soup recipe that has horseradish. Many thanks.  I can't get another cookbook for at least 2 weeks!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
dorcast's picture

(post #62905, reply #46 of 80)

Made the Tomato, Fennel & Shrimp soup today. Halved the recipe, though I don't think this one makes as many servings as she says, and didn't add the balsamic vinegar at the end.
I love it!


Edited 1/23/2008 8:50 pm ET by Dorcast

soupereasy's picture

(post #62905, reply #47 of 80)

I made the potato, bacon and chive with horseradish yesterday. Didn't really like it. Next up for me is the tomato, butternut squash and herb. I have been wanting a nice tomato soup.
The tomato, fennel and shrimp sounds good but fennel has been a bit pricey of late.

dorcast's picture

(post #62905, reply #48 of 80)

Fennel has been pricey here too. I used one large bulb to halve the recipe. It would be good as a fennel tomato soup even without the shrimp.
Let me know how your next one is.

soupereasy's picture

(post #62905, reply #49 of 80)

I wondered about how it would be without shrimp. That would make it much more economical even with the pricey fennel! Oh to have so much money that I didn't care about costs. ;0

soupereasy's picture

(post #62905, reply #62 of 80)

Made the tomato, butternut squash and herb soup today.Very nice! Probably even better tomorrow. Good texture, and I really don't need the added cream.
If you are not a fan of cilantro I would omit it. More than enough flavour from the basil.

bwf17's picture

(post #62905, reply #74 of 80)

Hi,


I am new to Cooks Talk, my name is Mary and I hope I am doing this correctly.


I have been reading for two days now, and am interested in the Tomato, Fennel and Shrimp soup.  Can anyone tell me where to find this recipe please?


Most sincere thanks,


Mary

 
dorcast's picture

(post #62905, reply #75 of 80)

Hi and welcome,

There was a tomato fennel soup in a recent issue of Fine Cooking that many seemed to like.
I haven't tried that one, but this is from the New England Soup Factory cookbook and is great.

38383.59 in reply to 38383.58
I did not bother with the vinegar & basil at the end. I didn't have fresh basil, and didn't think the soup needed the sweetness of balsamic.
I think it would still be a great soup without the shrimp.

* Exported from TheRecipeManager *

Tomato, Shrimp and Fennel Soup

Source: New England Soup Cookbook

Qty Measure Ingredient
------------------------------------------------------------
3 bulbs Fennel, chopped and stems discarded
2 -3 tbsp Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper

SOUP
3 Tablespoon olive oil
4 Clove garlic, peeled
2 rib celery, diced
2 carrot, peeled and sliced
6 Cup peeled whole tomatoes (canned or fresh)
4 Cup fish or chicken stock
1 Tablespoon fennel seed
1 Pound uncooked small shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 Tablespoon olive oil
1 Tablespoon Balsamic
8 - 10 Basil leaves, torn
Salt & Pepper

Instructions: -For Roasted Fennel
Preheat oven to 450. Place fennel in small roasting pan and drizzle with olive oil. Season with S&P. bake for 25 minutes, or until the edges turn a light caramel color.

-For Soup
Heat olive oil in large, heavy-bottomed stockpot over medium-high heat. Saute the garlic, onions, celery and carrots for 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes, stock, and fennel seeds. Bring to boil.
Reduce heat to medium low and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove from heat.
Puree the soup in the pot using a hand blender or working in batches with a regular blender until smooth. Return to heat.
Add the shrimp and cook for 3 - 5 minutes.
Add the roasted fennel, olive oil, vinegar, basil, s & p,.
Return to stove and heat an additional 2 minutes

bwf17's picture

(post #62905, reply #76 of 80)

Thanks so very much, I have been a Fine Cooking and Fine Gardening subscriber from issue #1.  I remember seeing the tomato and fennel soup, but I will have to revisit it.


Many sincer thanks for sending this recipe.


Mary

 
Gretchen's picture

(post #62905, reply #77 of 80)

Mary, welcome. And I'm glad someone saw your request and posted it.


Take a look at the left hand side of the page and the headings of the various folders. Then when you want to post a question, try to find a folder that describes your question, and it will get really quick attention.


Gretchen
Gretchen
bwf17's picture

(post #62905, reply #78 of 80)

Thanks a million Gretchen....and thanks for the warm welcome.  I am still trying to figure out how to use the site. 


I have been a Fine Cooking and Fine Gardening subscriber since the first issue.  I think it is a superb magazine and now with all of the additional expertise and generous help here, it is only better.


Many thanks,


Mary

 
MadMom's picture

(post #62905, reply #79 of 80)

Hi, Mary, and welcome to CT.  Post any request for a recipe in the folder labeled "Looking for a Recipe" (or something similar, I always forget the correct wording!)  Some people only read a few folders, so it helps you get an answer quicker.



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And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

bwf17's picture

(post #62905, reply #80 of 80)

Thanks so much....for all the help.


Mary

 
Florida2's picture

(post #62905, reply #21 of 80)

I just ordered the soup and sandwich cookbooks from jessica biscuit--thanks for the recommendations-- and It was much cheaper than going to amazon. Thanks for the resource.

Biscuit's picture

(post #62905, reply #22 of 80)

Oh, you've never purchased from them before?  It's a great resource for cookbooks.  Cheaper than Amazon and if you can get free shipping it's a real steal.


Glad it was helpful!


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw