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TRISH DESEINE

Ballottine's picture

TRISH DESEINE (post #62686)

(I am not sure whether I should ask you, Glenys or Ashley or ALL)


Do you know anything about Trish Deseine.  Of course, I googled, but I want informed opinion.  I have a cook book of hers with "...traditional European recipes for modern daily life," which seems to  have been written in Paris,  but was published in London.


The pictures are excellent, I want to make every dish I see, but the recipes are way too short and simple.  Don't know....and that is why I am asking.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

ashleyd's picture

(post #62686, reply #1 of 24)

Totally new name to me I regret to say.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62686, reply #2 of 24)

I do have a book by her, I believe. It might even be the same one, but I cannot check just now as it is at my Mom's house. It was a Christmas gift from my Secret Santa. Recipes looked very simple, and many of them looked rather  "everyday" French to me. I think the measures are metric.


I don't know anything about the author, however.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #3 of 24)

I have never heard of her either, but I have her book Real Life Cooking.  When I googled first I came across the following quote:


"This time, I was very happy to use a recipe from Trish Deseine's book "Mes petits plats préférés", a brilliant and friendly and appealing collection of her favorite easy and slow-cooking dishes. The recipe is called "Gâteau de clémentines pochées" (Poached Clementine Cake) and is actually pretty similar to the one I used a year ago, with just a little more almonds and a little more sugar."


I started wondering if she was a  French, British or Canadian  "Donna Hay." 


Just a few moments ago I came across the following info:


Trish Deseine


Belfast-born Trish Deseine has been living and working in France since 1987. She has freely developed her passion for cooking with surprising results.


Trish is currently France's second bestselling cookery author.


Her first book Petits plats entre amis won the 2001 Ladurée and Seb prizes. Je Veux du Chocolat (2002) won a World Gourmand Award and has to date sold over 200,000 copies worldwide. Mes Petits Plats Préférés (2002) won the French Gourmand Award. Cooking for Kids won the 2004 Hédiard prize.


Trish's latest book, Du Caramel Plein la bouche, was hailed by Paris Match as a “hymn to gluttony”.


Trish is also a regular contributor to French food pages and will publish “Nobody Does it Better” with Kyle Cathie in 2006.


As a rule, I don't trust internet infofrom unknown sources, especially the hype.  Since neither you, nor Ashley or others on this board , all of whom I trust, never heard about her, I  don't  think I will pursue my interest in her any further, unless, of course,  Glenys knows her.


I have been revisiting Cookwise,  so I am returning to it.  Thanks for your help. Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62686, reply #4 of 24)

Trish is currently France's second bestselling cookery author.


Hmmmm. This sounds strange to me. I scour the bookstores in Paris and may have more French cookbooks than American and other cookbooks. I have also subscribed for years to several popular French cooking magazines and I had never heard of her until I received this book (which I'm pretty sure is the same one, now that you give the title) at Christmas.


I don't think any of the recipes were for dishes where I would expect long involved recipes - I seem to recall, they were pretty simple. I have not tried any of them.


I have also observed that in many cases, French recipes assume a certain level of competence, and thus leave out some of the basics.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #5 of 24)

Thanks for your info.  As I said, if you and Ashley have never heard of her, I don't have to either.   This kind of stuff just makes me trust internet  info even less.


Now I am curious, who is the #1 bestselling  cook book author in France? LOL. Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #62686, reply #17 of 24)

Glenys knows everyone.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #18 of 24)

I know that, I was hoping she would respond.  Hope all is well with you. Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

TracyK's picture

(post #62686, reply #6 of 24)

Short and simple recipes can be delicious, a recipe doesn't have to be long or complicated to taste good. Why not just try one and see?


Surely, with your experience in cooking quite complicated dishes for so many people, you've gained the ability to tell if a recipe is going to turn out well just by reading it.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

ashleyd's picture

(post #62686, reply #7 of 24)

Short and simple recipes can be delicious


100% agreement from me. One of my heroes when I was starting to cook seriously was Nico Ladenis and I was constantly amazed that recipes with so few ingredients could taste so amazing. He went on to get three Michelin stars so he was no slouch in the kitchen.



Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #9 of 24)

Short and simple recipes can be delicious, a recipe doesn't have to be long or complicated to taste good…


 


I wholeheartedly agree.  I am not against “short and simple,” I was simply curious  about this reportedly  “second bestselling author in France.”   I LOOOOVE the pictures in her book, but I find her text a bit strange, especially if she has been honored with as many awards, as  that little blurb, posted on the internet, says.  Also take into consideration  the title of the book:


 


 


real life


COOKING


Traditional European recipes for modern day life


 


I expected recipes of traditional French dishes that could be made in tiny  European kitchens.


 


So I open the book to page 79.  Fabulous picture of a lamb shank, and I immediately understand what SallyBR meant by “the objectionable stuff” that she left on her plate.


 


Lamb Shanks with chickpeas and ras el hanout


 


Brown the meat all over.  Discard the oil if it has become too blackened. In the same pan adding a little oil if necessary fry the onions, garlic, ginger, carrots and ras el hanout for a few minutes.


 


So, I am no knitpick, I move on.


 


Page 127.   Incredible picture of a Shepherd’s  pie.  “This is what we are going to have for dinne tonight,” I tell myself.


 


Page 126, top of the page says Ground meat


 


Cottage pie deluxe


 


Let yourself go, stop pretending the only thing this dish is good for is using up leftovers.  You and I know very well that it’s actually a rather dubious excuse for combining various kinds of flavorsome (and miraculously preground) meat with delicious mashed potatoes. Here are a few over the top suggestions.


 



  1. To make the meat more succulent, don’t hesitate to add some of the pan juices-or even some duck fat if you are using duck- when you place it in the bottom of the dish.

  2. Cut meat into very small pieces.  Be up to date for once. Fashion is regressing.  Anything that even faintly resembles the boiled beef of our childhood will go down well.

  3. Add some layers of unusual ingredients: pine nuts, almonds, broiled walnuts, stewed dried fruit, spices, foie gras, onions, shallots, preserved garlic, or mashed peas, carrots, apples, pears, etc.

  4. I will never reveal the amount of butter and cream I put in my mashed potatoes.  I always use light cream for this recipe.

  5. Always season the mashed potatoes properly and do not stint on either the quantity or quality of the grated cheese whether it be cheddar, Parmesan or Gruyere.

  


This is the entire recipe, no ingredients list, no proportions, no explanations on how to cut the ground meat, no nothing.  I was simply amused and I wanted to know if she is who internet says she is. Bal


 


PS:  Well, we did have Shepherd’s pie, but it was a few days later and I used the Balthazar book recipe.  And, yes, we had it without foie gras.  On those rare occasions we get foie gras we enjoy it prepared differently.


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

TracyK's picture

(post #62686, reply #12 of 24)

Perhaps it's more a translation problem? I've seen lots of recipes that say to "fry"  the aromatics, where probably "saute" would have been a better word choice.


I think I've missed the point of this post, LOL.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #16 of 24)

You are right, you missed the point of my post, but it is not important.  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62686, reply #13 of 24)

This is the entire recipe, no ingredients list, no proportions, no explanations on how to cut the ground meat, no nothing.


THAT,  sounds like a description of a translated french recipe, if I have ever heard one.


LOL!


I'll take a closer look when I retrieve the book from Mom's house. I don't know about the bestselling author thing, but I wouldn't discount the recipes just because they look overly simple or due to lack of very explicit instructions - many french recipes are like that. A certain level of basic kitchen knowledge is assumed. Much more so than here.I believe you read French, don't you? Take a look at some and see what you think.


Check out http://www.cuisineetvinsdefrance.com/ and


http://www.marmiton.org/general/home.cfm



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 2/10/2006 3:08 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #15 of 24)

Thanks.


My mom's recipes were the same way.    I was simply curious about her.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62686, reply #21 of 24)

Bal,


I got my book back from my Mom and it is the one you referenced. I will take a closer look at the recipes. 


AND the latest issue of Regal, a newish french cooking mag features an article by Trish. I haven't tracked down that issue yet at one of the couple of newsstands that carry European mags. I'd like to subscribe but one can only (apparently) do so by (french) bank check and snailmail.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #22 of 24)

Thanks.  Never heard of Regal.  I guess, I am falling behind the times. Old age has its advantages; nowdays, I tend to blame everything on a "senior moment." lol.

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Heather's picture

(post #62686, reply #23 of 24)

Why would one broil a walnut?
I have to agree, that is an odd "recipe." I've never read a cookbook where the author claims that her version of mashed potatoes is a secret.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #24 of 24)

My sentiments exactly, I hope you liked the pictures. l ol Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62686, reply #8 of 24)

Donna Hay comes to my mind - she has that book for 10 minute, 20- minute and 30 minute meals - could not be simpler! But they look spectacular and seem pretty tasty to me

I think you could give it a try - and of course enable a few people here to get her cookbooks afterwards... :-)

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #10 of 24)

I don't think Donna Hay is in TD's league.  Donna Hay's recipes work.  I have all of her books  and  not only I use them a lot and often, my teenagers  use them too. Bal


PS: I will never understand how people who cook for themselves and / or their families regularly,  can do so  without Donna Hay books. 


In case  you need more enabling,  here it comes: IMHO each and everyone of her books are good, but having all of them is  pure bliss.  LOL


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62686, reply #11 of 24)

I think I might have to put you on the ignore list (and that is SOME accomplishment by you, as you would be the one and only there.... )

:-)

 


 


"Born ok the first time...."

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #14 of 24)

OMEGOD!  And I am making the China Moon stock because of you this weekend.  LOL.  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

pamilyn's picture

(post #62686, reply #19 of 24)

Whats wrong with short and simple?  They are some of the best. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Ballottine's picture

(post #62686, reply #20 of 24)

There is nothing wrong with "short & simple."


I already responded to this question, I guess my  response was too long and  too tedious.


I guess most of us have not heard of Trish Deseine, despite her reported  success in France, because her books are poorly edited in English and a bit too cute for American cooks.


For example,  in her recipe printed on the page for ground beef, she tells you to cut the meat into small pieces.  In her recipe that calls for mashed potatoes she states that she will never reveal the amount of butter and cream she uses, etc. 


Photographs in her book are magnificent, when I first saw them, I wanted to make  each and every dish immediately.  LOL  Bal


PS:I love your kitty picture. 


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.