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Think Like a Chef

jwoods's picture

Think Like a Chef (post #62610)

Does anyone have an opinion about this book ( Colicchio )?  I am looking for a cookbook that I could give my 24 yo daughter that would help her with some good habits in the beginning.   Any opinions are thankfully received.


Thanks, James

TracyK's picture

(post #62610, reply #1 of 30)

I have it, it's a pretty good book. But if she's a beginner, or not well-versed in kitchen stuff, I'd recommend a good general book like The Joy of Cooking (even the new one, which is the only one I have). I find myself going to that book more than any of my other cookbooks.


"Given enough time, the proper resources, and access to some really toxic stuff, one can probably dissolve just about anything except Peep eyes."


http://www.peepresearch.org

Geoffchef's picture

(post #62610, reply #2 of 30)

Give her a subscription to FC! I have 10 feet of bookshelf space devoted to cookbooks, and the ones I refer to the most are FC back issues. The great thing is that most of the FC recipes are pretty easy to prepare, they don't use a lot of jargon, and you can find most of the ingredients without a Sherpa and a gold card.


The sooner I fall behind, the more time I'll have to catch up.

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

jwoods's picture

(post #62610, reply #3 of 30)

Good idea!  Why didn't I think of that?  Thanks.

Gretchen's picture

(post #62610, reply #4 of 30)

You might think about A New Way to Cook.  I gave it to our daughter and she really likes it.  MadMom had sung its praises.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #62610, reply #5 of 30)

BTW, if you're anywhere near a Tuesday morning, they have copies of A New Way to Cook on sale super cheap...about $14, IIRC...at least the ones in North Texas do.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62610, reply #6 of 30)

And I have been such a good girl, deliberately NOT going into the Tuesday Morning around the corner from my house for almost 2 months. . .


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Aberwacky's picture

(post #62610, reply #24 of 30)

I'm blaming you (G).


I went to Tuesday Morning just to look for the book, mind you, and came out with the book, plus a new pair of loppers (we did need them), a bottle of red-wine vinegar (didn't need it), and two sets of those hard-topped cork-backed placemats (kinda needed them).


In my defense, I did put back the napkins, tablecloth, bird bath, dog bed and dish-drying rack so at least I didn't buy those.


Thank goodness they didn't have any decent cookware, or I'd really been sunk!


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
MadMom's picture

(post #62610, reply #25 of 30)

But, just think about the great deal you got on the book!  I love to prowl through Tuesday Morning - had a ball there when they had their Villaware on sale.  They had some really good buys on that stuff.  Also picked up new towels for three bathrooms; ours were getting pretty shabby and needed to be tossed.  I'd much rather pay $5.95 for a good thick bath towel than $15 or whatever they want at the department store.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62610, reply #27 of 30)

It was a great deal (and thank you, by the way).  I haven't had a chance to read any of it yet, but plan to. 


And yes, I love going there.  You can get some great deals. 


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Marcia's picture

(post #62610, reply #7 of 30)

All of the younger cooks I know, swear by "How to Cook Everything" by Mark Bittman. From what I've seen of it, a new cook would find it very useful.

TracyK's picture

(post #62610, reply #8 of 30)

I'll be the voice of dissent then... My former roommate had that book and many of the recipes she tried from it were confusing or poorly written, and didn't turn out well. Granted, she was a bit of a moron, but there you go! :-)


I think it was someone here who suggested the book should be called "How to Cook Everything (if you already know how to cook)."



"Given enough time, the proper resources, and access to some really toxic stuff, one can probably dissolve just about anything except Peep eyes."


http://www.peepresearch.org

Gretchen's picture

(post #62610, reply #9 of 30)

I remember that discussion--it was definitely anti-Bittman. 

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #62610, reply #10 of 30)

Interesting, because I've heard exactly the opposite, though I don't care for the book myself. It is hard to say how difficult the recipes may be when you DO know how to cook!


I don't like The Joy of Cooking for beginners, though I seem to be in the minority about this. I don't mean the new edition, which is so completely different as to be another book.

TracyK's picture

(post #62610, reply #11 of 30)

I love the new Joy of Cooking. I really do turn to it more often than any other resource (including CT!). :-)


"Given enough time, the proper resources, and access to some really toxic stuff, one can probably dissolve just about anything except Peep eyes."


http://www.peepresearch.org

shoechick's picture

(post #62610, reply #12 of 30)

For a new cook, I wouldn't like Joy or The New Way to Cook.  Not enough pictures of what it's supposed to look like.  I like Donna Hays books.  Isn't there "A New Cook" or something like that?  I also started reading through the CIA's 'At Home" it's really good and the directions seem easy to follow.

Born Free....Now I'm Expensive

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Wolvie's picture

(post #62610, reply #21 of 30)

ahhhh - I have been looking for a review on the CIA book - thanks!

"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

shoechick's picture

(post #62610, reply #22 of 30)

Can't say I've made anything out of it yet, but it seems like a good read.

Born Free....Now I'm Expensive

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

foodie's picture

(post #62610, reply #26 of 30)

speaking of bittman, thay call this a "faux pas" at artizan.com


http://www.theartisan.net/FauxPas_Frameset.htm

Jean's picture

(post #62610, reply #28 of 30)

But, nobody's made a cooking Faux Pas since. Last updated on: 06/03/99

When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane.
www.thebreastcancersite.com



 

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
CTI's picture

(post #62610, reply #29 of 30)

Thanks for the link, foodie. I learned some things. They came down on FC, along with CI and MS.

foodie's picture

(post #62610, reply #30 of 30)

i love the artisan website, they have the best info on bread baking.

mishmish's picture

(post #62610, reply #13 of 30)

The subscription to FC is a great suggestion. My 20 year old new cook is having good success with the Best Recipe series of books by CI. The instructions are clearly written and the basic recipes provide a springboard for creativity.


Ignorance is a voluntary misfortune
Don't let your mind wander. It's much to small to be out by itself.
MadMom's picture

(post #62610, reply #14 of 30)

My suggestion would be "How to Cook without a Book" by Pamela Anderson.  This is a really great cookbook which has more emphasis on basic techniques, with additions to modify or alter the basic recipes...check it out.  Bittman bites.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Marcia's picture

(post #62610, reply #18 of 30)

I'm not familiar with "How to Cook Without a Book", but I recommend Pam Anderson's other books very highly. And if you say it is good for a beginner, MM........

MadMom's picture

(post #62610, reply #19 of 30)

I once told Ms. Anderson that I should get a commission from her, since I recommend it so often!  It's great, IMO.  For example, in discussing sauces, she gives proportions (so much liquid, so much flavoring ingredients, so much spice, etc.) then she gives various combinations using those proportions.  The thing I like is the flexibility and the encouragement to new cooks to experiment; if you don't like thyme, use rosemary, etc.  The concept is having a basic "recipe" that can be modified to use the ingredients you have, the ingredients you like.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62610, reply #15 of 30)

If she genuinely has an interest in cooking, I would agree with others that A New Way to Cook should be considered. It's daunting by its size, and it doesn't have as many pictures as others, but her principles are sound.  I just made the roasted chicken that many have highly endorsed, and found it to be outstanding.  It went especially well with Jacque Pépin's Skilet Roasted Potatoes from the latest issue of FC, which, incidently, are to die for!   


The Joy of Cooking is a good reference book, and I use it often, but I've always been turned off by the format.  I think I'm more of a visual person.


I have all of the Donna Hay books, and love each one of them.  However, I'm not sure that they'd be best for a beginner.  To keep her directions brief, the author leaves out a lot of technique, assuming the reader can fill in.

Geoffchef's picture

(post #62610, reply #16 of 30)

I have 30 year old editions of both J of C and the Good Housekeeping cookbook, I actually like the Good Housekeeping better. Still make their blender Hollandaise for eggs Benedict. Have to admit, when I'm researching a menu, they both come out, along with the New York Times, an old James Beard.....

Twenty four hours in a day, twenty four beers in a case. Coincidence? I think not! Steven Wright

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #62610, reply #17 of 30)

For a relative novice A New Way to Cook may be a little bit daunting, terrific though it is for for folk who have the basic skills. Not familiar with the Colicchio book but for all sorts of basics I still turn to The Way to Cook by Julia Child.

"Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
Voltaire

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

dixie1's picture

(post #62610, reply #20 of 30)

I still turn to The Way to Cook by Julia Child.


My all-time reference cookbook. When I have a question about something I am cooking, this is the first book I look into. I love Julia Child.

Geoffchef's picture

(post #62610, reply #23 of 30)

Yours is the latest of many endorsements Ashley. I plan to search out JC. (No reference to that other thread!)


'these voices - they're a kind of bridge back to the human world.' Aldous Huxley "The Doors of Perception"

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary