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A Southern Deborah Madison???

lpiperclark's picture

I love Deborah Madison as well as a couple of other authors who focus on farmers markets and local produce: how to use it and when it's in season. The problem is that they seem to focus on produce found predominantly in the the northern U.S. Who would be the equivalent writer for southern produce like collard greens?

Glenys's picture

(post #62957, reply #1 of 19)

If you're looking for recipes there are some great new vegetable books out there. Deborah includes collard greens in her books. You might find her Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone a help. As far as regionalism goes, she's based in Santa Fe so if anything she's probably more helpful to someone from the North, since they have very defined growing seasons, including a very cold winter in the desert.

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #2 of 19)

I love "Gift of Southern Cooking" by Scott Peacock and Edna Lewis. It's not vegetarian, but has extensive vegetable recipes, and of course uses the best of Southern produce. Another book that has good Southern vegetable recipes is "Fanny Flagg's Whistlestop Cafe Cookbook." There's a marketing niche for future cookbook writers - Southern Vegetarian.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

lpiperclark's picture

(post #62957, reply #3 of 19)

Thank you! Wonderful suggestions. I hadn't thought of those. I'm not necessarily looking for vegetarian books but just ones that focus on local, fresh, in season ideas.


Edited 8/11/2008 10:12 pm ET by lpiperclark

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #4 of 19)

It's a good thing that you're not looking for strictly vegetarian, because the best collard greens always start with pork stock. (lol)

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #5 of 19)

Not everyone agrees about the pork stock, but I surely do. Bacon fat isn't bad, either, but I prefer to cook smoked pork hocks, refrigerate and skim the fat. You get all the flavor and the greens are still healthy.

Nowadays, the most flavorful hocks I find are at Whole Foods. It's interesting to me.

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #6 of 19)

My favorite "seasoning" these days is country ham scraps. They're very flavorful, and not particularly fatty like bacon, salt pork, etc., can be. I also like smoked turkey legs & wings, but they can be greasy, too.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #7 of 19)

Country ham scraps would be ideal, but they're not easy to find where we are - you're fortunate to have them around. Country ham certainly doesn't lack in the flavor department.

As for the smoked turkey, I've tried it and don't care for it. It could be that the kind I purchased was inferior because it wasn't very flavorful. You're right, turkey can be fatty, too.

May I suggest another cookbook for you? Never mind, I'm going to do so. LOL. Damon Lee Fowler has a book out called Classical Southern Cooking which has just been updated in a recent new edition. I have the original and it's wonderful. I also recommend Damon Lee Fowler's New Southern Kitchen, which has many updates and riffs on traditional dishes.

I surely agree with you about Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock's book but have you seen Edna Lewis' older books? They're wonderful, too, and there are lots of stories, but I love stories. :)

According to Amazon, the updated version of Classical Southern Cooking is available but B&N indicates that it will be released in October. I'd go with the latter on this.


Edited 8/12/2008 12:44 pm ET by Marcia

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #8 of 19)

Marcia, will you be my sister? Instead of sharing clothes, we can share cookbooks!


I missed Damon Lee's Classical Southern Cooking when it was first published and then it became very difficult to find. I have his other books, except for Fried Chicken, and I've cooked from them all summer long. They are terrific - lots of information, solid recipes, engaging stories. I am so excited about the updated edition coming out this fall!


Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #9 of 19)

My dear, I have more than enough cookbooks to share. That's a lovely thought. Since I have no real sisters, you'd be most welcome on my sister list. :)

I have Fowler's fried chicken book and for the life of me, I cannot lay my hands on it. I was sure I knew exactly where the book was, but no, it's not there. Oh, well, it will turn up eventually. It's much more diverse than I would have expected, but if one is going to write a one subject cookbook, perhaps diversity is a necessity.

Tell me, have you heard that his New Southern Baking is fraught with errors? I believe that I read a number of reviews on Amazon about this, but am not sure about the source. Where ever it was, many people were very upset and naturally so if this is true. I have the book, but I don't bake much...please don't ask. ;-)

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #10 of 19)

I have 3 brothers and no sisters. See, it's meant to be.


The reason I didn't buy the Fried Chicken book is because of what you wrote - it seems like a limited subject for an entire book.


I just checked Amazon & didn't see a mention of errors in New Southern Baking. I haven't used that book very much, but I haven't had problems with the handful of recipes I've tried.


Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

lpiperclark's picture

(post #62957, reply #11 of 19)

What a fun exchange between you two, but can I interject a blasphemous way to cook collards? I start with butter and olive oil, and melt anchovies along with some garlic. I then do a fast stir fry on the collard green so they don't cook very long and scarf them down as fast as I can. Love this.

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #12 of 19)

I steam-sauteed collards a while back, probably early in the spring, and they were very good. I never would have thought of anchovies - sounds delish.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #13 of 19)

I have no brothers, either, so it was certainly meant to be that I pick up extra sisters along the way. :) With three brothers, you surely need sisters, too.

As for the bad reviews, I'm sure I read them somewhere, but I lose track sometimes. Will report back if I find the source.

Fledge's picture

(post #62957, reply #15 of 19)

I saw her first.


 


You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #16 of 19)

LOL! You'll be my first sister, and Lucy my second.

LuciaK's picture

(post #62957, reply #17 of 19)

Pout!

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #62957, reply #18 of 19)

BTW, Lucy, I found the negative reviews of Fowler's New Southern Baking on BN.com. Evidently there was one typo and a couple of people went nuts about it.

It's true that you have to be careful with cookbooks, and the current crop is not edited as well as those in the past.

I love being fought over. (blush)

Fledge's picture

(post #62957, reply #19 of 19)

Not to worry, I share. Gracefully.

You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Gretchen's picture

(post #62957, reply #14 of 19)

Almost any southern cookbook. Someone suggested Edna Lewis. Another is Lee Bailiey. Craig Claiborne cooked a lot of greens, etc.  Bill Neal. The new one by Jean Anderson.


Oh, and Frank STitt. But there is a wonderful little cookbook called the Potager--a French kitchen garden. What to cook every season--and how to grow it.


Gretchen


Edited 8/17/2008 7:45 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen