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The Silver Spoon Italian cookbook?

Nightrider's picture

DH sent me this link today: http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051103/en_nm/italian_cookbook_dc, wondering if I would like this for Christmas.


Anyone use this book before?  Any good?


My DH is Italian, and so I rarely cook Italian, because my food cannot stand up againt his Nonna's homemade spaghetti (and other Italian classics).  Nonna's spaghetti is unlike anything I have ever tasted.  I'm just wondering if this could possibly be the Italian cookbook that might help me


TIA,


Laura

Pumpkie's picture

(post #62658, reply #1 of 113)

I ordered it but have not received it yet.  I not only collect cookbooks and it looked like a great one to add but most of my mom's family is italian so even though I can't cook a lick of italian close to what they can it should be an interesting read also. 

Sondra's picture

(post #62658, reply #2 of 113)

Just saw it yesterday in B&N.  OMG, it's not only a tome, but is a virtual what's what of Italian cooking.  No doubt about it, gotta have it.  On my (very long) list of must haves, moved it right to the top!

Jean's picture

(post #62658, reply #3 of 113)

Looks wonderful. Amazon has it.

The Silver Spoon (Hardcover)
by Phaidon Press, eng 1264 01Phaidon Press
(2 customer reviews)    

List Price:
$39.95

Price:
$26.37

You Save:
$13.58 (34%)

Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Sondra's picture

(post #62658, reply #4 of 113)

DH found this site for me: http:\\phaidon.com\silverspoon


Lists recipes in Adobe Acrobat document, also you can see recipe samples.  This thing really is a great addition to a cookbook library. 

Jean's picture

(post #62658, reply #5 of 113)

That one didn't work for me but this one does.


http://www.phaidon.com/silverspoon/us_silverspoon/silverspoon.html


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ashleyd's picture

(post #62658, reply #6 of 113)

I've read several reviews of this and had a glance through it at the bookstore just to check it out. If you want a comprehensive guide to Italian cooking then this is a great addition to your personal library. One small caveat, the basic book, although revised and updated, is over 50 years old and some of the recipes are definitely showing their age and include ingredients that you are going to have difficulty finding. If you have Marcella Hazan then you probably don't need this (want is another matter), if you don't then it's a good buy.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

pamilyn's picture

(post #62658, reply #11 of 113)

Which Marcella Book are you referring to? The age had me a bit worried also. 50 years old is old. ( I will be 50 in January, I know old) Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

ashleyd's picture

(post #62658, reply #13 of 113)

The one I have is Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking . Excellent.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #62658, reply #14 of 113)

very excellent. LOL

AJ12754's picture

(post #62658, reply #15 of 113)

Thought you all might like to see this -- LA Times preview of new fall cookbooks - it mentions Silver Spoon and many others


http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-cookbooks2nov02,0,5922812,print.story?coll=la-home-food


As well as a nice article on the old favorites of the Times food editors


http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-favorites2nov02,0,1826042.htmlstory?coll=la-home-food


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald


Edited 11/5/2005 6:16 pm ET by aj12754

Cave obdurationem cordis

Lee's picture

(post #62658, reply #16 of 113)

Good articles.  Thanks for posting the links.  I highly recommend both Judy Rodgers'  Rib Roast of Pork, which has become a family favorite, and Richard Olney's Onion Panada.  Julia's blender hollandaise has been a staple for many years. (Recipes can be found on the second of the posted links). 

AJ12754's picture

(post #62658, reply #17 of 113)

You're very welcome -- I cannot wait to try the panada -- I could almost smell it cooking just from reading the recipe!

"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis

Unschoolmom7's picture

(post #62658, reply #19 of 113)

We made this (onion panade)  in a culinary class I took, but used duck stock instead of the water. It was amazing.


Karena

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62658, reply #20 of 113)

One small caveat, the basic book, although revised and updated, is over 50 years old and some of the recipes are definitely showing their age and include ingredients that you are going to have difficulty finding. If you have Marcella Hazan then you probably don't need this (want is another matter), if you don't then it's a good buy.


Yes, I think I will pass on this book for now.  I read the recipe for tiramisu, which looked good, but it contained two raw eggs, something you wouldn't find in any new cookbook these days. 

Glenys's picture

(post #62658, reply #101 of 113)

"Yes, I think I will pass on this book for now. I read the recipe for tiramisu, which looked good, but it contained two raw eggs, something you wouldn't find in any new cookbook these days."

No raw eggs? No Caesar? No aïoli? No chocolate mousse? Raw eggs are everywhere in new books and old.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62658, reply #104 of 113)

No raw eggs?


Oh, it's not me.  I grew up making myself an eggnog every morning with a raw egg and a hearty dose of vanilla, and I always make my own mayonnaise.  One of my favorite desserts to make for a dinner party is Snow Pudding from the '60s.  But, it seems that everyone is so afraid of raw eggs these days.  I think we've had a discussiion on them on this board.  And, I rarely see a new cookbook that doesn't have a word of caution when a recipe calls for a raw egg.  But, no, I will continue to enjoy a Caesar Salad now and then.

PreviewAttachmentSize
snow-pudding.jpg
snow-pudding.jpg23.83 KB
Glenys's picture

(post #62658, reply #105 of 113)

I think the only place you're going to see that cautionary raw egg note is in U.S. books. The salmonella fear from raw eggs Is rampant in your country and we certainly don't put that caveat in our publications. Europe, they're still smart about poultry and egg production so it's not bothersome to them.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #62658, reply #61 of 113)

I LOVE Marcella's recipes....also the Time Life book  Savouring Italy available at Sam's for about $22.00....beautiful.

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62658, reply #106 of 113)

I have Marcella but I still like it...LOTS of stuff I'd forgotten about...stuff I'd eaten at the homes of friends' families, etc. And I love the drawings ;)


Umm...difficult ingredients? Definitely some. I wanted to make Chamois in Red Wine tonight, but the butcher had no chamois, so I thought I'd try Snipe with Juniper, but WF was fresh out of snipe. Damn! Had to settle for Braised Rabbit with Peperonata (seriously, it was good - with roasted potatoes and broccoli rabe)


This is the fourth (and last) cook book I have bought this year. That's the most I have bought in one year in a long time. I guess I don't just crave EVERY single one that comes along! Ha!


 


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Lee's picture

(post #62658, reply #107 of 113)

Had to settle for Braised Rabbit with Peperonata (seriously, it was good - with roasted potatoes and broccoli rabe)


Yum.


Edited 12/6/2005 12:32 am ET by lee

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62658, reply #112 of 113)

I guess I don't just crave EVERY single one that comes along! Ha!


I do.

Lee's picture

(post #62658, reply #7 of 113)

I ordered it the other day.  I received an email from Jessica's Biscuit listing the web site Jean posted -- very well done promo on the site.  The book looks very interesting.  It's the first time the book has been available in English (there are both US and British versions).  I think it's cheaper from Jessica's ($23.95) than Amazon.  

Jean's picture

(post #62658, reply #8 of 113)

Free shipping from Amazon at $26.+

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lee's picture

(post #62658, reply #10 of 113)

Same free shipping deal at Jessica's.

pamilyn's picture

(post #62658, reply #12 of 113)

Let us know what you think O.K ? I trust your opinion. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

pamilyn's picture

(post #62658, reply #21 of 113)

Lee, have you gotten this yet? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Gretchen's picture

(post #62658, reply #22 of 113)

I heard an interview with the editor the other day on NPR and she made the point that it has been heavily revised with more explicit instructions added.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #62658, reply #24 of 113)

The book arrived last week, but I haven't had time to go through it leisurely.  It's an enormous compilation of regional recipes (I think lifting it surely must count as weight bearing exercise) and seems to cover everything from antipasti to desserts.  In some instances, there are recipes for numerous regional versions of the same dish, which I always find very interesting.  It seems to be nicely edited with clear instructions.  Lots of photos.  I spotted some ingredients that might be hard to find, even in a large city, but most of the recipes I looked at are very approachable and have that marvelous, straightforward Italian simplicity.  No foo-foo food here.  The book lays flat when it's opened (a real plus IMO), and the chapters are color coded along the margins, which I like.  I would have liked some background on the regions where the dishes originated and commentary on the differences between the same dish as prepared in different areas, but I guess you have to take into account the fact that it's a translation of a cookbook for Italians who already know these things.  A friend mentioned she had looked for it at the big Borders on Michigan Avenue, and they were already sold out! 

Wolvie's picture

(post #62658, reply #31 of 113)

okay, that's it.


I'm ordering it.


Too many enablers at this site. :-)


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

Barbara48's picture

(post #62658, reply #32 of 113)

Cosco had it yesterday for $22.99. Couldn't resist. It is big,,,