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Planked Brie with Roasted Cherry Relish

Glenys's picture

Last night I did a class with one of our local treasures, Rockin' Ronnie Schewchuk. Last year Ronnie was voted one of nine "premininent grillers" in North America by F&W, with such great company as Stephen Raichlen, Bobby Flay, The Jamisons- you get my drift. His most recent book, Planking Secrets, has a stellar selection of recipes. Planking is historically part of Westcoast First Nations culture but for everyday, it's fast, smoky, versatile and takes no special equipment. The class and the menu, all outdoors, was heaven, made perfect by the teacher and the touch of smoke. Planked Brie with Roasted Cherry and Tomato Relish, Tandoori Planked Salmon with Fresh Peach Chutney and Cooling Minted Yogurt, Pork Loin Roasts with Jack Daniels and Apricot Glaze and finally Pear Crisp with Rosemary. He chose cedar, alder and maple as the three woods, one with each of the first three courses and back to cedar for the pear. Here's an abbreviated version of the Brie:

2 small round Brie, preferably not perfectly ripe, top crust removed; keep chilled until planking
1 maple or fruitwood plank soaked overnight

l lb fresh cherries, pitted (I used Bing)
1 lb cherry or grape tomatoes
a little olive oil, salt and pepper
balsamic vinegar
Balsamic Reduction (optional for later)
Spead the dressed cherries and tomatoes on a baking sheet and roast at 350°F for one hour then reduce the heat to 300°F. Drizzle with a little balsamic vinegar. Reserve.

Preheat the grill with lid on to 500°F inside "the chamber". Heat the soaked plank on the grill until it sends of a bit of smoke and crackles.
Top each round with about 1/2 cup of the relish, spead over the top then transfer to the hot planks. Cook 10-12 minutes, lid closed, but watch because Brie will melt at varying temperatures. You don't want it running all over.

Transfer to a platter and garnish with more relish, drizzle Balsamic Reduction if you like and serve with baguette.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62749, reply #1 of 46)

This sounds wonderful! Wonder how it would be with some of the Montmorency cherries I got last week.

<Edited to add: Okay, I'm doing this, but I'm gonna MadMom things and use goat cheese instead of brie, and sour cherries instead of Bings. Will report back.>

"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
Gen. Michael Hayden


Edited 7/28/2006 2:40 pm by shywoodlandcreature

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #2 of 46)

I think it would be delicious but I liked the deep, porty flavour from the bings. I wouldn't hesitate to make it without the tomatoes either but it needs an acidic balance, like the vinegar.
Edited to say, you're going to have to watch the goat cheese or put it in a dish. That brie melts to liquid in a flash.
Ekited again to say, it has to be in there long enough to pick up the smoke, which the rind does and so does the cheese. Without the smokey flavour, it won't be the same.
Edited 7/28/2006 2:42 pm by Glenys


Edited 7/28/2006 2:43 pm by Glenys

deejeh's picture

(post #62749, reply #3 of 46)

How do you think it would work with white cherries?  I just came by a couple of pounds.


deej

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #4 of 46)

I don't know. How wood you describe their flavour?

deejeh's picture

(post #62749, reply #8 of 46)

Well, they're a lighter version of a Bing - definite cherry flavour, but not so sweet.


deej

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62749, reply #5 of 46)

I wonder what would happen if, after preheating the grill and getting the plank nice and smoky, you were to turn off the grill - wouldn't that buy some more time for the smoke to permeate the cheese? (Also wonder if this recipe is a good candidate for P's new, as-yet unused smoker?)





"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
Gen. Michael Hayden

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #6 of 46)

But if you use the smoker, there's no need to plank. Planking is fast, the wood does the job. But you could ask Ron, he loves email.
www.ronshewchuk.com

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #7 of 46)

I just don't know, I was a cheese planking virgin until last night. You should get the book though, for Cheesy Garlic Bread on a plank.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #62749, reply #9 of 46)

Definitely will get that.

 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #62749, reply #10 of 46)

and here I thought he lived in Calgary.

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #11 of 46)

He lived in Calgary for years but he lives in North Vancouver now. He travels with his competition team, the Butt Shredders.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62749, reply #23 of 46)

Butt Shredders


LOL!!  Spewed iced tea on my screen for that one.


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
ashleyd's picture

(post #62749, reply #12 of 46)

Planking... takes no special equipment.


...cedar, alder and maple as the three woods


Preheat the grill...


Assuming, of course that you have access to three different kinds of planking and your city condo has somewhere to put a grill. Other than that no special equipment at all.


I think the phrase is "get real"



Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.


Edited 7/28/2006 6:00 pm by ashleyd

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #13 of 46)

Well, as logic would have it, if you can't grill, you can't plank unless you build a bonfire, but I doubt anyone without a grill (or a bonfire on their balcony) would would be deeply moved by the concept of planking. Getting a plank is as simple as going to the lumber yard and buying a piece of untreated fence board. That's what I do, and they cut it for me into sections or I buy a few shingles. Home Depot will do it. You don't need all the different woods, and in fact, in the U.S. you can get mesquite and in Hawaii they use guava wood. Put the wood on the grill, that's it.
I should also explain as well that every fish department or fish monger here on the Wetcoast carries planking, even Safeway. And just why would someone buying a book based on grilling if they didn't have a grill?

Edited 7/28/2006 6:44 pm by Glenys


Edited 7/28/2006 6:45 pm by Glenys

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #14 of 46)

According to Ron, you can use cedar, fruit woods, alder, cherry, hickory, maple, oak (the flavour of Texas bbq), mesquite and some exotic hardwoods. Here, you can buy planks at different bbq places made by this company
www.westcoastlifestyles.com
The planks were much thinner than most and really worked quickly and efficiently.

Debby's picture

(post #62749, reply #22 of 46)

Thanks for this Glenys!  I'll have to order some.  It was with great excitement that I came across Ron's "Planking Secrets" cookbook (complete with a few pieces of cedar planking) at our Langley Costco for $14.99!  Picked up three--one will be a birthday present for brother-in-law and the other, part of a Christmas present for my oldest son (he's too busy with renovating a new house to be all that interested just now).  Haven't had a chance to look at it yet--maybe tomorrow!


Debby

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62749, reply #27 of 46)

Debby, where in Langley do you live? We're in the Willowby area (yes, where all that @#@& new development is happening!) Drop us a line, and maybe we can meet up sometime soon.





"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
Gen. Michael Hayden

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #28 of 46)

Debby and I have known each other in classes before I got to know you.
She's out Abbotsford way. She and Nora are the best.

Debby's picture

(post #62749, reply #37 of 46)

Brookswood area.   My husband and I have been looking around for a larger lot and want to downsize the house a bit.  Don't want to move out of Langley tho!  The prices are too crazy to want to try anything just now.


I'm afraid that Brookswood is going to be the next Willowby--as far as development goes!  We looked into "Hight Point" but in just a few weeks they doubled the price on their lots!  Where will it all end?!


Do you shop at that "Well-Seasoned" on the #10 By-pass?  Was so excited the other day to discover that they have all those different planks that Glenys was talking about!!!  --Some from that West-Coast Living   that she mentioned!  They keep getting more and more 'stuff' in that store--love to shop there!  And they are so good about trying to bring in anything you want that they haven't yet got!


Would love to get together with you some time! 

PeterDurand's picture

(post #62749, reply #38 of 46)

Where is Well Seasoned on the bypass? I don't recall ever having seen it.

Cheers,

Peter

 

Debby's picture

(post #62749, reply #43 of 46)

Here's Angie's website for "Well Seasoned":  http://www.wellseasoned.ca/


It's in a complex near United Carpet; just west of Glover, on the north side of #10.


Debby

Glenys's picture

(post #62749, reply #44 of 46)

"It's in a complex near United Carpet; just west of Glover, on the north side of #10."

Take a right turn at Albuquerque!

I want to join you as well but I'm not free at all next week. All these people want to cook, can you imagine!

Debby's picture

(post #62749, reply #45 of 46)

Looks like next week won't work for everyone--so what about the following week?  Would be fun to meet some more of your friends!


So where are you busy cooking next week?  Last I heard, you weren't as busy as you'd like to be! :)  That must have changed in a big hurry!


Debby

chiquiNO's picture

(post #62749, reply #46 of 46)

Do you by any chance have his recipe for the peach chutney???  Por Favor??

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62749, reply #39 of 46)

I've never seen Well Seasoned either. Let's do get together. Maybe we can meet for lunch at the restaurant Tuck posted last week. (Peter? what's the name again?) It'd be fun to have a mini-fest of Fraser Valley CTers.





"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
Gen. Michael Hayden

PeterDurand's picture

(post #62749, reply #40 of 46)

How about next Wednesday (the 9th)?

 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62749, reply #41 of 46)

A workday for moi, alas!





"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
Gen. Michael Hayden

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62749, reply #42 of 46)

You two! I always envision you to be in the same house, in different rooms, posting to each other on CT :)

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

ashleyd's picture

(post #62749, reply #15 of 46)

This is obviously a case of regionality because I suspect that fishmongers away from the wetcoast don't sell planks. Another plug for putting your region in your profile so people can check things like this. And oh, nothing wrong with the article, it's just the phrase "no special equipment" that doesn't work for me, for me that means it doesn't need anything which is not readily available in the average kitchen store or likely to be in an everyday kitchen.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62749, reply #16 of 46)

I have bought packages of cedar planks in regular grocery stores (ie not WF or high end places) in the Boston area, in St. Louis, in rural Vermont, and in southern and northern CA. They are usually displayed near the seafood condiments or smoked fish. And they are in pretty much standard in kitchen stores, I think. They have become pretty common here in the last few years.


 Two weeks ago I was in Williams Sonoma in DC and they had sort of a new version - thin, paper-like pieces of wood, to be wrapped around fish - they are sort of pliable. Think woodshavings but bigger, maybe the size of a sheet of writing paper.



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 7/29/2006 2:57 am ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay