NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

I would enable if I could....

SallyBR1's picture

.... however, I cannot remember the title of the book, or where I saw someone raving about it (some blog, I suspect)

maybe someone will know what I'm talking about

It is a HUGE cookbook - maybe 600 pages? Over 1,000 recipes, from all over the world.

The title was ..... World - but I cannot remember the other word. Cucina? Culinaria? Cuisine?

I tried searching amazon.com for it, no success. But I am not Super Schnitzle Woman

anyway, if we manage to find out which book I'm talking about, I would appreciate the input of those who heard about it and/or have it

 


 


"I was not courageous, I was inebriated"
(Canuck's suggestion, January 2007)

courgette's picture

(post #62815, reply #40 of 47)

My SIL has MS. She lives in Nova Scotia. One of the highest incidences in the world.


Mo

plantlust's picture

(post #62815, reply #41 of 47)

Is it only me or has anyone else noticed that MS seems to occur in women, specifically after a child is born?

Both people that I know (pen pal in OZ & a relative who's not really a relative) were diagnosed after their child was born. I've always wondered if that could be a trigger, like maybe your body is predisposed to MS but childbirth causes it to manifest?

ONE WEEK Pumpkin-sitting w/the only Houdini dog in America. Day 4.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Jean's picture

(post #62815, reply #43 of 47)

Hmm. I've known more men with MS than women.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #62815, reply #36 of 47)

Where have you been, girl?  That's what they're talking about doing for my fractured vertebrae.  What do you know about it?  I need to learn all I can before Friday, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

APonKP's picture

(post #62815, reply #37 of 47)

Good Grief! Obviously I haven't been here! You have a fractured vertebrae? Ouch!!
I wish I had know this when Avery was here. Not that he could answer what would be best for you without seeing you or knowing all about it. Saturday I only heard him refer to the brain stents, etc. in relation to the conference in San Francisco about stroke victims.

The little info I had about the injection of bone cement for spine fractures went back to a few years ago when he was in Tampa. Since nothing is ever simple, lots of homework is required for sure. It would seem to me that as noninvasive treatment as possible would be the first choice though. I have several friends here that have had back poblems and had something done that "cured" them pronto. I would expect that this was it, but I didn't ask for details. If there is no chance of any tumor, and if there are no other vertebrae at risk that might be affected, that might be the ticket. It seems your MRI should tell that story.

How much do you know about your Dr.? Where did he train? (really important, IMO) How many of these has he done? Did he give you all the options, disadvantages? How do you feel about him in your gut? Women's intuition, you know. Have you been on the computer searching? I couldn't sit with my herniated disc problem. The only halfway comfortable positon was on my side. My treatment from ####Nuerosurgeon involved merely a brace until it healed. But if I had the same today I would be interested in the Vertebroplasty (not sure about the spelling) if it was indicated, because of the time involved in the healing process.

It is for sure that different specialties have their different opinions about treatments, which makes it hard for the patient to know what is what. Did you have doctors in Texas that you thought were really great? Have you called them to ask their opinion? I used to call back to VA when I was faced with some things out here. They were more than happy to discuss it. They can look up the info on the DR. in question too.

One thing is the procedure has been around a while, which is a good thing. Problems should be apparent by now.

Duke is relatively near you and has a good reputation. As a whole, I would guess that NC medicine is pretty good. When we first moved out here, 20 years ago, I felt that too many hesitated to take the conservative approach. Afraid of lawsuits I think. I had so many tests prescribed. Many unnecessary, IMO.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
MadMom's picture

(post #62815, reply #39 of 47)

We have been extremely impressed with the doctors and the medical facilities around here.  In this area, particularly, there seems to be about 45% wealthy retirees who golf a lot, maybe 20% wealthy horse farm owners, and the rest of us.  Fortunately, the average age seems to be pretty high, and the average income is equally high, so that usually translates into good medical care.  The doctor who is scheduled to perform the procedure is the most experienced one around here, but I'm not sure how many he's done.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #62815, reply #42 of 47)

I will point out that her (AP/KP)  man is a neurologist/neurosurgeon doing the injecting. As DH said, our neurosurgeon/friend has been doing it also. 

Gretchen


Edited 2/13/2007 4:46 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
APonKP's picture

(post #62815, reply #47 of 47)

I saw a neurosurgeon for my back, but our friend is a neuroradiologist. Both do the same type of procedures now?

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
APonKP's picture

(post #62815, reply #46 of 47)

It sounds like you are in a good spot. I imagine everything went smoothly and you will be pulling weeds before long. I'll try to check to see how you are doing. Our son has been here and we have been busy morning to night.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
Marie Louise's picture

(post #62815, reply #45 of 47)

Ouch, Mad Mom. I don't know much about that, sorry. I do remember learning about it in school, but it was for bone cancer patients. Apparently for them it is the most amazing cure, so hopefully it will be for you as well.

AP, I didn't go to those talks because we don't do neurosurgery at my hospital, but they making the most amazing advancements. I'm impressed that you know someone doing that work!

wonka's picture

(post #62815, reply #21 of 47)

You're getting scary! lol

Wolvie's picture

(post #62815, reply #24 of 47)

ah. I had not seen this book. Looks interesting. :-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

Geoffchef's picture

(post #62815, reply #11 of 47)

My favourite - soon to be no more - cookbook store just got in a copy of El Bulli - on sale for $375 CDN (retail $450)! And there are no recipes in it! They come on the accompanying CD ROM.
Ashley do you keep yours in a climate controlled glass vault?

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #62815, reply #23 of 47)

Wow that IS expensive! Mine was around half that price, still not cheap but it is fascinating. I quite like the idea of having the recipes on CD though.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Wolvie's picture

(post #62815, reply #25 of 47)

so - this is a book I should pick up whilst "over the pond" as it were? :-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #62815, reply #26 of 47)

I "had" to have it just to see what it was all about, and I don't regret buying it, whether it is worth it or not, moot point.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

bktlush's picture

(post #62815, reply #44 of 47)

Silver Spoon? Wonderful cookbook!