NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Food that Really Schmeks

SallyBR1's picture

This link leads to a discussion about a cookbook from Canadian author, Edna Staebler, entitled "Food that Really Schmeks"

http://creampuffsinvenice.typepad.com/

Apparently she is very well known in Canada - forgive my ignorance.

Hope this will be useful for those of you who are into buying cookbooks

 


 


"I was not courageous, I was inebriated"
(Canuck's suggestion, January 2007)

courgette's picture

(post #62802, reply #1 of 20)

She died lst fall. She was 100 years old, I believe.


And I don't have any of her cookbooks. Shame on me!


Mo

Rhea's picture

(post #62802, reply #2 of 20)

I have a couple of her cookbooks and her recipes are usually quite simple with great results!I had read that she started selling her baked goods at the markets in the Kitchener/Waterloo area in Ontario.  She was well known to still set up shop at the local Kitchener/Waterloo markets and talk about food with the shoppers ... there is a lovely recipe for slivered green beens that she was well known for....I think it has sour cream in it....not at home, so I cannot post it(sorry...)


She has atleast 2 books in print, but if I am remembering correctly, there may be a couple more...


I found her books at used book stores in Toronto.


I can't even afford the lifestyle I don't want...

I can't even afford the lifestyle I don't want...

ckells's picture

(post #62802, reply #3 of 20)

Schmecks!! I haven't heard that word for years. My father and grandfather used it to describe somethings that smells (limberger) or something that smells really good.


It was a good word and I'll start using it.

ashleyd's picture

(post #62802, reply #4 of 20)

Too close to schmuck for me to feel comfortable about!


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Jean's picture

(post #62802, reply #5 of 20)

LOL> Think of it more like the Dutch smakelijk. 




They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ashleyd's picture

(post #62802, reply #7 of 20)

I prefer the Dutch "lekker" which means pretty much the same thing, although you do get the sense of "lip-smacking" from "smakelijk"!


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Jean's picture

(post #62802, reply #9 of 20)

Oh, yes, a familiar refrain in our house in my childhood was "smaak lekker".  The best compliment a cook could expect.



They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
assibams's picture

(post #62802, reply #6 of 20)

LOL 'schmecken' is the German word for 'to taste'. In Austria we add good or bad, something that isn't done in Germany. Irks me to no end, because how can you say 'it tastes' without saying how....


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

plantlust's picture

(post #62802, reply #12 of 20)

But but Schmuck is jewelry...sparklies....bling!

Ice & snow? No problem, painting is low tech.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Jean's picture

(post #62802, reply #13 of 20)

ummmmm. not really.


The word schmuck has become common in American English meaning a detestable person, or a jerk. The word also means a stupid or idiotic person. In these senses, schmuck entered English as a borrowed word from the Yiddish slang for foreskin, (Yiddish: שמאָק, shmok), where it is an obscene term and an insult. In his famous cultural lexicon, The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten lists the Yiddish schmuck as related to the Slovene word, šmok, meaning "a fool, an innocent, a gullible dolt."




They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #62802, reply #14 of 20)

I always heard your definition...plantlust was the first one I ever heard refer to it as "bling."



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

plantlust's picture

(post #62802, reply #15 of 20)

I suspect Mother & Father use the German definition.  Just WAIT 'til I tell them what it really means<g>.


Of German origin, Schmuck means jewel or jewelry. The name is commonly seen on signs and billboards in Germany and Austria related to the merchandising of precious jewelry. The Schmuck family name has been traced to the birth of Christian von Schmuck in 1370. In 1624, an Armorial Patent, or Coat of Arms, was granted at Rattenberg by Archduke Leopold V of Austria.


Ice & snow? No problem, painting is low tech.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

Jean's picture

(post #62802, reply #16 of 20)

Wow, how confusing!! LOL



They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
UncleDunc's picture

(post #62802, reply #18 of 20)

In the Unix/C programming world, the Shared Memory Control library is abbreviated as shmectl, which I always thought sounded Yiddish or German, but I didn't know what it might mean.

JillElise's picture

(post #62802, reply #20 of 20)

My Dad, when I was 13 and asked him what it meant, told me it meant "peni" (Edited: I meant "####")(redited - I guess I can't write the word for the male sexual organ...) I imagined, when I learned the German meaninging, that it refers to the family jewels... I later learned that it means foreskin.


It's vulgar in my family. In yiddish, it's not a nice word. Useful, but not nice!


In German, it's different.


 


Jill Elise Vancouver BC

Edited 1/18/2007 6:23 pm by JillElise


Edited 1/18/2007 6:24 pm by JillElise

Gretchen's picture

(post #62802, reply #8 of 20)

Yes, I thought it had to be with a 'c'.

Gretchen

Gretchen
FitnessNut's picture

(post #62802, reply #10 of 20)

Ha! This is quite a coincidence. Last night, I pulled out my Staebler book and made banana muffins, which I am eating right now as I read this. I've been cooking from her books for about 15 years - I credit her bread recipes for getting me hooked. She is a legend in the Kitchener-Waterloo area where my parents live.

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
madnoodle's picture

(post #62802, reply #11 of 20)

My mom was a big Edna Staebler fan and had several of her books.  I remember reading them cover to cover when I was a kid.  I think I probably made every cookie recipe she printed when I was a young teenager.  Good memories.  I was really sad when she died, and called my mom  to commiserate as soon as I heard the news.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Nightrider's picture

(post #62802, reply #17 of 20)

These cookbooks really are lovely to read right through...a very conversational style, and lots of stories.  I never made many of the recipes, and found a few absolute failures (i.e. missing ingredients/wrong measurements given).  Love to read them, not so much to cook from them.

FitnessNut's picture

(post #62802, reply #19 of 20)

Oh yes, there are some real stinkers in these books....and some winners. I've added notes throughout so that I can avoid the former ;-) Her bread recipes tend to be good, though you do have to be flexible with the flour quantities as she tends to not use quite enough for the amount of liquid.

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell