NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Favorite Vegetarian Cookbooks

whatscooking's picture

Would anyone like to offer suggestions?  I want to buy a new vegetarian cookbook and I went to the bookstore today and couldn't find what I was looking for although the shelves were loaded with them.  I'm looking for one that is healthy (recipes aren't loaded with cheese) but not overboard healthy to the point that flavor would be sacrificed in order to make a recipe low-cal or low-fat.  I was also hoping to find one that had world recipes: chinese, indian, thai, mexican.  Maybe not all in one book, but just something with some ethnic flavor.  I have a couple of Deborah Madison's books (Veg. for Everyone and Local Flavors) and those are good, so this time I was hoping for a fresh perspective.


My apologies:  I meant to post this in t&t cookbooks.  My kids were distracting me.


The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift


Edited 9/30/2008 4:32 pm by whatscooking

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

roz's picture

(post #62967, reply #1 of 27)

I, too, like vegetarian cookbooks, but most seem to be of the '60-70's variety, a lot of lentil loaf! But I do like this site

www.101cookbooks.com

Heidi has reviewed a number of vegetarian cookbooks, so maybe you'll find something there you would like to own. Good luck, I'll be hoping for other reviews.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
whatscooking's picture

(post #62967, reply #2 of 27)

"primarily features healthy vegetarian recipes..."


Thanks.  That's exactly what I'm looking for.


The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

roz's picture

(post #62967, reply #3 of 27)

I guess we're flexitarians!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
2house67's picture

(post #62967, reply #4 of 27)

The Moosewood books are good and easy. 


Josie

Josie
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62967, reply #5 of 27)

Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian cookbook is excellent. One book I particularly love, but I think is out of print is The Sublime Vegetarian (correction: it is available through Amazon, and it is really amazing. Author used to be exec chef at Sooke Harbour House. I can't recommend this one highly enough). Just about any Indian cookbook will have a wealth of great recipes.





“I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't believed it.”
Marshall McLuhan

whatscooking's picture

(post #62967, reply #9 of 27)

Madhur Jaffrey's books are a great suggestion.  Thanks for reminding me about her.  Also, I've heard raves about Julie Sahni's indian cookbooks.

The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62967, reply #12 of 27)

Another book that Peter and I both like is The Passionate Vegetarian by Crescent Dragonwheel - I know, the name and the look both conjure visions of '60s era granola and molasses, but the recipes are actually very good.


Have fun! I'm really just starting to explore vegetarian cooking, despite several years of cohabiting with a pescatarian/vegetarian.  






“I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't believed it.”
Marshall McLuhan
MadMom's picture

(post #62967, reply #14 of 27)

Isn't it Crescent Dragonwood?  I bought one of her books, and loved her writing style.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #62967, reply #15 of 27)

You're both close-- it's Dragonwagon. LOL



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62967, reply #16 of 27)

Thanks. I usually manage to mangle her name, sometimes quite creatively.





“I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't believed it.”
Marshall McLuhan

MadMom's picture

(post #62967, reply #20 of 27)

You're right!  I even googled and got it wrong.  D'oh!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

wonka's picture

(post #62967, reply #23 of 27)

I have her soup cookbook. I make up the herb mix for a really nice hearty bean soup.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #62967, reply #24 of 27)

I'll have to check that out. I love soups, especially as we get into the cold, dark part of the year. I really like her chile recipe - that with a pan of good corn bread is my idea of comfort food heaven.





“I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't believed it.”
Marshall McLuhan

wonka's picture

(post #62967, reply #25 of 27)

I grew up eating chili at least once a week. I love it but the legumes don't love me back and the family won't eat chili. Heathens.

soupereasy's picture

(post #62967, reply #26 of 27)

Check out her "Dairy Hollow House Soup and Bread" book. Lots of great ideas! :)

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62967, reply #27 of 27)

I've been reading "Dairy Hollow House Soup and Bread" cookbook here lately.  Haven't cooked from it in awhile, but it's getting to be that time of year.


Leigh


Strengthen your immune system; eat more dirt!


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
pamilyn's picture

(post #62967, reply #10 of 27)

Lots of fat and cheese in that book.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

2house67's picture

(post #62967, reply #13 of 27)

I did not really find that, but then I usually only cooked the beans and grain recipes.  It would be nice to try some of the other books.


Josie

Josie
wonka's picture

(post #62967, reply #11 of 27)

Funny, I've never like any of the moosewood books. I've always found their recipes too heavy somehow. When I was visiting my girlfriend in Ithica, we went to the Moosewood Cafe and I was really disappointed in the food.

Florida2's picture

(post #62967, reply #6 of 27)

I like the moosewood cookbook, but I find I have to add a bit more flavor in their cooking. Otherwise, I like them.

Glenys's picture

(post #62967, reply #7 of 27)

I thought about this for a while. One of the reasons Deborah Madison's books are so good, or that Madhur Jaffrey's are a great addition to any shelf, is that they have options that are both simple or complex in both execution and flavour. The Moosewood books are a bit rustic for me. On to a book from last year, Peter Berley's Flexitarian Table. Excellent recipes with lots of varied inspirations, including how to make it with an non-vegetarian variation on the fly. All the food we made from the book, which is based on Peter's years as executive chef at one of NYC's vegetarian restaurants, but also cooking for his family .

whatscooking's picture

(post #62967, reply #8 of 27)

Thanks for your suggestion.  I will definitely take a good look at this book next chance I get.  I like the term Flexitarian, it sort of describes how I eat, since I'm not a vegetarian but I like to cook vegetarian dinners a few nights a week and I'm looking to increase that. That's why I wanted to splurge on a new book :)


 


The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

butterscotch's picture

(post #62967, reply #17 of 27)

OK, I'll have a go. I've been looking for a new and inspiring vegetarian cookbook myself.  The other day, I took a look at Mollie Katzen's 100 Vegetable Dishes I Can't Live Without and was really impressed by how varied, tasty and even original the selection looked.  In general, I'm not a fan of hers--I dislike the cutesy-poo drawings and the fact that all of her books are printed in that annoying cursive script--but I'm willing to put up with these annoying features because the recipes look so interesting.  In terms of variety,the recipes are generally Mediterranean but there are some are Chinese and Japanese-inspired ones, too. I didn't notice anything that looked Indian.


I also love, and highly recommend, Neelam Batra's The Indian Vegetarian.  She is one of our local cooking goddesses here in L.A., and her recipes are dynamite.  She and her husband are both Indian but have been living in California for many years, and the book is a big mix of traditional Indian and "fusion" recipes.  It is very comprehensive.  There are chapters on Indian sweets (fudge-like candies made with nut milks) and breads and instructions about how to make paneer (Indian soft cheese).  There are lots of vegetable curries, daals, chutneys, and rice dishes.  She is very experimental and provides, for example, recipes for Indian-style salads and dressings and will suggest using vegetables like avocado that are not used in traditional Indian cooking.  I think the most fascinating fusion dish in the book is a vegetarian shepherd's pie created by her brother-in-law when he was a student in England.  I gave this book to a friend who is a vegetarian and has spent a lot of time in India, and she was delighted with it.


Finally, you might consider Karen Lee's The Occasional Vegetarian.  If you want this one, you'll probably need to order it from Amazon since it's been out for quite a while.  As the title suggests, it's a "flexitarian" approach. But while she sometimes suggests places where chicken or beef stock could substitute for vegetable stock or will tell you that a certain vegetable side dish will go well with, say, a veal chop, in general it's a very vegetable-oriented book.  The author is a NY caterer with a health conscisous clientele. I think she has a very congenial approach to fat--she's ok with it in small quantities, including butter, peanut oil and half-and-half.  As a result, the recipes are flavorful and not guilt-inducing. They are also not fussy. The book is a mix of recipes you can find anywhere--hummus, Cuban-style black bean soup, frisee-pear-walnut salad--and more unusual ones.  I have loved many of the unusual ones, some of which are really simple: e.g., tomato slices, topped with crumbled goat cheese and thyme, broiled until the cheese browns a little. On the slightly more elaborate side, there is an orzo "risotto" and southwestern-style polenta that are both TDF, a pasta with artichokes in a mustard/cream sauce, and white beans with tomato and sage, all of which I love to make.  DH--generally stubbornly opposed to vegetables-- likes her lentil ragout a lot.  The author claims to be an expert on Chinese cooking.  After trying a couple of the "Chinese" recipes here, I had to laugh.  They're awful. (Chinese Charred Caponata?) But she does provide some good ideas for healthy Chinese-style dishes (whole grain fried rice with interesting combinations of veggies) if you're willing to experiment with seasonings. 


 


 

dorcast's picture

(post #62967, reply #18 of 27)

I took cooking classes with Karen Lee in her apt ####years ago. I had almost forgotten about it until I saw your post. I have to dig up those recipes. Geared towards healthy cooking, with a slant towards Chinese.

butterscotch's picture

(post #62967, reply #19 of 27)

What was she like? And how were the classes?  I'd be curious to know if the recipes she gave you ended up in the book.

dorcast's picture

(post #62967, reply #21 of 27)

I'm sure I kept any recipes we used, but it predates my having a computer, and I've moved since, so I have to search.
I do remember making Peking Duck with her, and she bought a duck for each of to take home and work with. I lived in a studio apt, hot summer day.....by the time I was done cleaning the duck and turning my apt into a sweat lodge with the oven on, I swore it was something I would only order in restaurants in the future.
Classes were fun. It was always a small group, in a home kitchen, and we enjoyed the meal and wine together at the end. I will admit, that I knew the class had an Asian bent, and that her last name was Lee, and was very surprised to meet a quirky little Jewish woman.

butterscotch's picture

(post #62967, reply #22 of 27)

Thanks for sharing your recollections.  I do like her book--much better, in fact, than a lot of better known veggie cookbooks.