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Favorite Pickling and Preserving books?

Aberwacky's picture

I know we've talked a little about this in various threads, but I'm looking to add a little to this end of my cookbook collection.


Recommendations?  Ones to avoid?


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Ricks503's picture

(post #62744, reply #1 of 28)

I have the Ball and Ortho books and like them.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Ricks503's picture

(post #62744, reply #2 of 28)

When you pickle, you see many recipes that call for pickling spice, or mixed pickling spice.  Does anyone have a good recipe for pickling spice that can be used to make Kosher Dill Pickles?


Also, out of curiosity, how many picklers take the time to use either the brine or fermentation process as opposed to the fresh pack?


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62744, reply #3 of 28)

I use the Rodale mixture and like it:


Rodale's Whioe Pickling Spice


2 Tbs. Bay leaves                        1 Tbs. Cardamom seeds
1 Tbs. Dried ginger root             1 stick of cinnamon
1 ½ whole dried chili peppers (more can be used if you like it hot)
2 Tbs. Mustard seeds                 1 Tbs. Whole allspice
1 Tbs. Coriander                          1 Tbs. Peppercorns
   Crush bay leaves. If you have cardamom in the pod, pound it with a mortar and pestle to extract seeds. Also pound dried ginger root and break cinnamon stick into small pieces to distribute flavors. Dried chilies can be broken or crushed into small pieces.
   Combine bay leaves, cardamom seeds, ginger, cinnamon, chili peppers, mustard seeds, allspice, coriander, and peppercorns. Blend, and store in an airtight container. Use as directed in recipes. Yield: 4 ounces


As for fermented/brined and quick process pickles, I'm doing both this year. 


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
macy's picture

(post #62744, reply #4 of 28)

I have done dill pickles the old-fashioned way, but it was a long time ago. Every year when I see the pickling cucumbers, I think about it and then can't find the dill flower heads. They used to sell them in big bags next to the cucumbers. I think it can be done with dill seed instead, but you don't use pickling spices. Just dill and garlic---a hot chili if you like heat and some grape leaves if you like your pickles crisp. Have you ever made fermented pickles? They taste just like the ones you get at the deli. You can even make half sours. I like them better than the home canned vinegar type. It's a whole different taste.

Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #5 of 28)

grape leaves if you like your pickles crisp


I never heard this before, can you explain further?




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
macy's picture

(post #62744, reply #6 of 28)

I don't have much info on it, but the article I have from a 1988 National Gardening magazine on old-fashioned brine-cured pickles says "The [fresh] grape leaves [washed and with stems removed] give a little flavor but more important, supply tannins that help keep the pickles firm." In the pickling chapter of Home Made in the Kitchen by Berry Buestein & Kevin Morrissey, there is a side bar to the recipe for Kosher Dills that says "For any of the cucumber recipes, a grape leaf or two may be added to each jar if extra crispness is desired." It doesn't specify if the grape leaves have to be fresh or if canned are okay. The only other recipe for pickled cucumbers is one for Sour Gherkins (and that one does use pickling spice, but again, no vinegar). That's all I can tell ya :-)

Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #8 of 28)

Interesting.  Thanks.



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
macy's picture

(post #62744, reply #9 of 28)

Oops, I lied. I just found another pickled cucumber recipe in this book---for Spicy Cornichons, and it uses vinegar. So I guess the grape leaf trick can be used with any type (if you can find them).

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62744, reply #10 of 28)

My understanding is that the grape leaves (and they need to be fresh) contain a substance that prevents the enzyme in cucumbers from softening them.  Supposedly cutting off the blossom end does the same thing.


I'm not sure if the grape leaves only work with fermented pickles or if they work with quick process, too.  I know alum doesn't work with quick process pickles.


We have lots of wild grapes growing in the woods around our house, so I'm going to try some this year.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #11 of 28)

I've got wild grape vines all over the place too, thanks to the birds.


I gave all my canning jars to my niece. Darnit. I love home made dill pickles!  We've done the grapevine wreath thing...any other ideas what to do with grapevines besides tear them out?  I should check and see if there are any wild grapes on them.  They make wonderful grape jam.


BTW, your package is on its way. :)




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 7/14/2006 11:10 am ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Aberwacky's picture

(post #62744, reply #12 of 28)

Oooh, thanks!


Grapevines make nice winter decorations for bare or new arbors--cut long ones and wind them around the posts and thread them through the tops.


The leaves can be pickled for dolmas, and put on the bottom of the tray make nice bases for fruits and veggie trays.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #13 of 28)

All good ideas.  Cool idea to line trays with them.


Don't need anything on the trellis. R got it up just in the nick of time this spring. A couple of years ago we planted trumpet vine down by the side of the old milk house-cum-storage shed. This is the year they are leaping!!




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #62744, reply #21 of 28)

Hey Jean-- I've got a wild grapevine in my yard, and it occasionally has grapes... small, hard green ones. Would these work for jam? How many would I need?

Salt early, salt often.

Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #22 of 28)

When they turn purple you can try them, if you can get them before the birds do. My friend is the one who made the jam-years ago and it took lots, IIRC. I'll see if i can google a recipe.



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #23 of 28)

I do love google.


Cook one quart of wild grapes until the pulp comes off the seed. Push through a sieve, then, to separate the seeds from the pulp. Core two quarts of apples and grind them—peels and all—with a food grinder. Cook the ground apples until they're soft. Combine grape pulp and cooked apples. Add equal amounts of brown and white sugar a tablespoon at a time until the jam is sweet enough for your taste. Then add a tablespoon of cinnamon and simmer over low heat until thick. Can this or keep it frozen. If you decide to can, just place the jam in sterilized jars as it comes from the kettle.


````````````````````````````````


or here's an interesting site with several options. I'm bookmarking this myself in case we have some this year. :)


http://www.faqs.org/qa/qa-3948.html




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
wonka's picture

(post #62744, reply #16 of 28)

I make mine with fresh grape leaves.


Edited to add: I use a recipe book called Fancy Pantry by Helen Witty. I have loved everything I've ever made from it.


Edited 7/16/2006 12:47 pm ET by wonka

Jean's picture

(post #62744, reply #17 of 28)

I found a cheap copy and have sent for it.  Join the list of enablers. I'm not sure which edition I'm getting but I do love surprises. LOL



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
wonka's picture

(post #62744, reply #18 of 28)

Happy to enable any time.

Munch's picture

(post #62744, reply #7 of 28)

I like the Ball books too. But my favorite is Putting Food By by Ruth Hertzberg, Beatrice Vaughan and Janet Greene. The Farm Journal Freezing & Canning Cookbook is a fun read too.

I have made pickles using grape leaves, but it was a really long time ago, well... 28 years ago... and my MIL taught me step by step. I do remember that the grape leaves were fresh. The pickles were made in a large pickling crock and were weighted down with a plate. They were delish!

Chocolate is cheaper than therapy , and you don't need an appointment!

Chocolate is cheaper than therapy , and you don't need an appointment!
cynthy's picture

(post #62744, reply #14 of 28)

Small Batch Preserving.  Interesting and different recipes and you don't have to make alot in one batch. 

jojo's picture

(post #62744, reply #15 of 28)

Blue Ribbon Preserves by Linda J. Amendt.  A little intense about preserving, but the recipes have so far been good.

butterfingers's picture

(post #62744, reply #19 of 28)

This is my ABSOLUTE FAVORITE!!!! Hands down. It is a treasure!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0870136291/qid=1153158155/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-9415066-2313509?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

However, it is definitely not for beginners. The author has great combinations, but she uses green apples to make her own pectin which adds an extra step, and she does not practice FDA approved canning practices. (It was translated from French, and they are not as anal about such things methinks). I take her recipes and adapt them to more traditional methods. But the recipes are worth the price of the book.

Adele's picture

(post #62744, reply #20 of 28)

I tried two things from that book, and did not care for either.  Way too sweet, never jelled correctly.  Now I know that is probably because of the apples, they probably weren't the same as she used, but it turned me off. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Wolvie's picture

(post #62744, reply #26 of 28)

this looks like something I would like - thanks for the tip (er ...enabling) . :-)

Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.


THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY,  September 23, 1860.


 

 

butterfingers's picture

(post #62744, reply #27 of 28)

Sorry! (Kind of -- you'll like it!)

Aberwacky's picture

(post #62744, reply #24 of 28)

Well, since I had all the other books mentioned in the thread (blush), I went spelunking on Amazon and the Harvest forum at GardenWeb and came up with this one:


The Joy of Pickling, by Linda Ziedrich.  So far, I really like it.


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1558321330/sr=8-1/qid=1153747006/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-5386092-2967826?ie=UTF8


It has a thorough introduction to pickling, both history and how-to, and loads of recipes for everything from dill pickles to kimchi.  Made the Gardinera this weekend, and will try her pickled okra and dilly benas recipe tonight.  Won't be able to taste the results for a few weeks, though.


If you're interested in pickling (which gets short shrift in most preserving books), this is a fabulous book.  The "why" explanations in the beginning are worth the price to me.


Leigh


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
pamilyn's picture

(post #62744, reply #28 of 28)

I just made some zucchini pickles from that book yesterday. Good book. I like it alot. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Gloriana's picture

(post #62744, reply #25 of 28)

Hi: Gloriana here. Would like to reccommend the following 2 books:
THE JOY OF PICKLING by Linda Ziedrich
PICKLED by Lucy Norris
Both books available from Amazon. Good for beginners as well as the adventurous!