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Cooking at Home--Julia and Jacques

kai_'s picture

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I'm sure book this has been mentioned before, but I just got around to reading some of this book (and had been reading the board as comments were made, so I no longer recall). What soul! And info! Open anywhere for an enjoyable read. See next post for random examples.

kai_'s picture

(post #62584, reply #1 of 1)

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Julia: (p.106): "I am probably one of the few people around who saw the real Caesar Cardini making his salad. I was about 9 when my parents took me to his restaurant in Tijuana . . . I remember most clearly the eggs going in, and how he tossed the leaves so it looked like a wave turning over. . . . But you don't want herbs or anchovies and things like that--then you have adulterated it."

Jacques: (p.115) "Classically, vinaigrettes are made with a proportion of three parts oil to one part of vinegar, but for me that is too acidic. I suggest a four-to-one ratio, since the mustard contains vinegar too. But vinaigrettes are a matter of taste: if you like a more acidic dressing, simply add more vinegar or lemon juice; or add more oil if you wish."

The photo of stuffed artichoke bottoms, stuffed tomatoes, and Provençal tomatoes (p.213) would look good framed.

For Jacque's Provençal tomatoes he says: (p. 211) "As you sear the tomato halves in a hot pan, in my recipe, you caramelize the cut surfaces and juices of the vegetable, just like browning a steak or a roast. With meat, you want this crystallization to crust the pan, so you can deglaze it for a sauce. But here, with a non-stick pan, these browned parts stick to the tomato and give them a delicious sharp-sweet taste and a beautiful look. And don't shove a spatula under the tomatoes to lift from the frying pan since it ruins the browned edges--pick them up instead with tongs, or a knife stuck into their round side."