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The Complete Meat Cookbook

FlavourGirl_'s picture

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by Bruce Aidells and Denis Kelly. This is a great primer for those who want to learn about cooking meat and equally interesting for those who already are educated about meat.

Adele_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #1 of 10)

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And has great rub recipes.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #2 of 10)

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This book is a standard recommendation to my students but does anyone know of a poultry book that measures up to Meat standards?

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #3 of 10)

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This is my favorite cookbook, even though I am trying to greatly limit my intake of red meat.

i anyone know of a poultry book that measures up to Meat standards
No, and it's a shame. I've posted this bit of trivia before, but Bruce Aidells got his start at a little casual place in Berkeley called Poulet (it's still there.) Big long deli case with -you guessed it-only poultry dishes. Everything from marinated duck to chicken salad. You either ordered to go or ate it on on of the few tables (they'd heat things for you). In the mornings, Bruce was back in the corner, cooking at the stove. One of their items were these little tiny, uncooked chicken-apple sausages that were a huge hit. They started appearing all over town. The rest is history...

If anyone one knows Bruce, try to get him to write a book on poultry, PLEASE.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #4 of 10)

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We received some butchered elk and I was not able to find a
i single
recipe for elk in this book. Am I overlooking one or is this
i The Incomplete Meat Cookbook?

Jean_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #5 of 10)

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If it has been butchered properly, it can be used just like a good cut of beef. Google on elk recipes if you prefer, and it can be used for any venison recipe also.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #6 of 10)

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Thanks Jean...was just wondering about marinating times, etc. It was absolutely maroon in color - very very lean. I used about 2 cups of red wine in my marinade and it's on its second day of marinating. I understand this type of lean meat benefits from very long marinating. I'm going to cook it tonight and will Google for some techniques. I would not have guessed I should treat it like steak because it's so lean and there is absolutely no marbling.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #7 of 10)

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I think the marinating can be iffy,Chiffy. Too much acid can leach out the natural juices leaving it dry. I've cooked very large moose roasts before but I treated tham like baron of beef. Browned first, long slow relazed cooking but rare at the finish. That's the extent of my experience- especially when I don't believe in shooting moose.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #62580, reply #8 of 10)

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i especially when I don't believe in shooting moose.

How do you kill them then?

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #9 of 10)

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Just a follow up...the steaks came out pretty well - given I'd never cooked elk before. If they were sliced thin enough, I'd resemble the experience to that of a flank steak. They tasted great and I boiled off the marinade to use as a sauce.

Jean_'s picture

(post #62580, reply #10 of 10)

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Sounds good to me.