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Chez Jacques: A Must-Have New Cookbook

Marie Louise's picture

"The book’s 100 recipes—for soups and appetizers, main courses, side dishes, and desserts—are Pépin’s own favorites among the thousands he has created over a lifetime of cooking. Using readily available ingredients and relying upon familiar techniques, these are the dishes he makes when preparing food at his Connecticut home. But Chez Jacques is more than a collection of well-liked recipes; it’s also a captivating sentimental journey. Each dish is introduced by a recollection—of picking dandelion greens for a spring salad, of buying fresh eggs from the local farmer—that invites readers to share in the traditions and rituals of Pépin’s most intimate circle.

This treasury of great food, lore, and memory is exquisitely illustrated with a sampling of Pépin’s paintings, as well as hundreds of color photographs of the finished dishes and of Pépin in all his “natural habitats”—pitching boules with a group of friends, savoring a glass of chilled rosé in the afternoon sun, painting landscapes, designing menus, and, of course, working in his kitchen."

I pre-ordered mine!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1584795719/ref=pd_ecc_rvi_cart_2/102-8212515-6202538

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #1 of 42)

I take this post of yours as a personal attack of great magnitude.

I am going to have to pre-order it

(LE HUGE SIGH)

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

Marie Louise's picture

(post #62823, reply #4 of 42)

hahahahahha. I ordered it immediately. It is Jacques, what can I say?

There is a special edition, too-comes in a slip-covered case w/ one of his art prints.

http://www.amazon.com/Chez-Jacques-Deluxe-Traditions-Rituals/dp/1584796014/sr=1-2/qid=1172368785/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/102-8212515-6202538?ie=UTF8&s=books

I may have to get this as my birthday present, but since I wouldn't let it get anywhere near the kitchen, I went ahead & ordered the regular one. If I love it, I'll hint to DH about the special edition.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #7 of 42)

I pre-ordered.

don t tell too many people, ok?

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

Marie Louise's picture

(post #62823, reply #8 of 42)

Just arrived. It is beautiful. However, I do not like how the recipes are written: the ingredients are imbedded among the instructions, in greenish- yellow capital letters. You can barely see them-in is going to take real searching to identify the ingredients beforehand. The recipes are all but unusable, they are so hard for me to read.

It is as bad-or worse-than that Gourmet cookbook w/ the yellow titles. I'm so disappointed; you think they would have learned from that widely-publicized mistake.

soupereasy's picture

(post #62823, reply #9 of 42)

Did you get the deluxe edition?

shoechick's picture

(post #62823, reply #10 of 42)

Is it just the cover and the art work thats different in the deluxe version? huge price difference here... either $35 or $180...ouch.

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Marie Louise's picture

(post #62823, reply #11 of 42)

No, the regular one. I was going to get the deluxe in addition, because I certainly wouldn't want to cook w/ it.

It is signed, numbered, in a box & I think comes w/ a print. Amazon has it for around $90. I'm going to have to look at it more before I decide.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #12 of 42)

I got mine too!

for me, the disappointment is the format of the book - too big, more along the lines of a coffee table book. I intensely dislike cookbooks that won t fit in shelves... ;-)

a lot of the stories are in the Aprentice book - but I don t mind, I am such a huge fan of Pepin

I agree that the ingredients in the middle of the description are not ideal. I guess he wanted to make it like a conversation with friends instead of the regular recipe format.

OH well - did you see that lobster souffle????? THat thing is calling my name pretty loud!

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #15 of 42)

I'm not disappointed at all. Love it! And his artwork...swoon! I admire him so much.


Yup, this will be the book for my project.


Marcia's picture

(post #62823, reply #18 of 42)

Please let me know when you do the snails in artichoke bottoms and I'll be right over. :)

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #19 of 42)

You bet. It does look scrumptious... like everything else in his book. This will be a fun project.


schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #20 of 42)

Marcia, did you see the picture on page 71?  
Hee...  I'll have to muster up some courage to eat oeuf mollet. ;·)


Oh, and how about the headcheese with 2.5 lb. of pig snout?  


SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #21 of 42)

Two recipes for tripe....

that is one thing I tried and definitely did not like. Not only it tastes funky, the texture is very unpleasant to me

I wonder if he makes some kind of magic with it. I doubt I would like it, though.

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #22 of 42)

I've cooked tripe before... think it was a Basque tripe stew. I liked it enough to make again.


And then there's the recipe for crispy sweetbreads. I've not tried sweetbreads. That'll be fun.


SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #23 of 42)

Sweetbreads are good, you should definitely make it if you can find it - or have it whenever you have a chance. Very mild flavor. First time I had it I did not know what it was. :-)

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #24 of 42)

First time I had it I did not know what it was. :-)


Yes, sometimes it's best not to know. LOL


Gretchen's picture

(post #62823, reply #27 of 42)

Sweetbreads, especially crispy, are DEElicous--a discovery later in life than when my parents served them (and brains) to me as a child--they having lived in many places in the world where that was the norm. It definitely WASn't in southern Ohio!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #62823, reply #25 of 42)

I saw the pic of headcheese and wasn't thrilled. Eggs mollet are very much like poached eggs - a bit beyond soft boiled and you can peel them. I used to make them for the children.


DH loves tripe but I've never cooked it nor sweetbreads which I adore. I might not adore them if I had to make them, but I'm squeamish about some things. Not tripe - I might make tripe if I can find it. Used to see it all the time - don't know what happened.


Did you see the picture of the roast chicken on salad greens? It was stunning.

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #26 of 42)

The photos are very good.


Hope I can find most of the less common ingredients locally. Even rabbit may be tricky to find, oh, and squab. Then there's poutargue... some of these items may have to be mail-ordered. 


Adele's picture

(post #62823, reply #28 of 42)

Shoot, I'm sure you and I pre-ordered within 24 hours of each other and mine hasn't even shipped yet.  Pout. Pout. Pout.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62823, reply #29 of 42)

I was not expecting it until May or June - I don t remember now what it said when I ordered. All of a sudden I get a message that it would be available earlier, next day the notice of shipment, and my credit card was billed.

go figure

I hope yours arrive soon!

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

Marcia's picture

(post #62823, reply #13 of 42)

I meant to mention how very irked I was at the way the recipes were written. It's a chore to find the ingredients.


It's surely a coffee table book, IMO, but then some other cookbooks have been getting too large to use comfortably, or so I think.

Gretchen's picture

(post #62823, reply #14 of 42)

What IS it with the newer cookbooks and that color printing!! they re-did the Gourmet cookbook because of the yellow type color. One of Racheal Ray's books is in a light colored type.  It is ridiculous. Do they ever look at them as readers do?

Gretchen

Gretchen
courgette's picture

(post #62823, reply #16 of 42)

I think the problem is that the people who choose the colour are young and can see anything. I remember not understanding how my Mother could not see to thread a needle. Guess who uses a needlethreader now!


I asked my kids about the ink in the Gourmet cookbook and they thought it was fine. I couldn't see it at all when I took it to bed at night. (That's where I do my best cookbook reading!) In the daytime I am fine.


Mo

Heather's picture

(post #62823, reply #17 of 42)

I wrote to Chronicle Books to complain about the small print used for the recipe ingredients in Tartine, also the pale peach page numbers that are impossible to see. I got a reply, basically "thank you very much--we always enjoy hearing people's comments on our cookbooks." Gee Thanks!
These cookbook designers need some practical education. I wonder if they cook?

PeterDurand's picture

(post #62823, reply #30 of 42)

I agree. It is the most frustrating book I have used for cooking. To make any sense I have to retype the whole recipe in a conventional format. i.e. list of ingredients for mise etc.

I love this guy and enjoyed every one of his books. Except this one. If used for cooking. As for the rest of it, the essays , observations, colour, paintings and so on are quite outstanding.

Cheers,

Peter

 

Marie Louise's picture

(post #62823, reply #31 of 42)

"I love this guy and enjoyed every one of his books. Except this one."

I had a chance to read [skim] this cover to cover yesterday. I am disappointed, too. I spotted a few things I'd like to cook, and I did enjoy his stories, but it wasn't all what I was expecting. I loved his recipes in his book w/ Julia, and I think a few of my tired & true are out of a Cooking w/ Claudine book. I thought his hundred favorite recipes of all time would yield a few dozen for me, but no way. For instance, he goes on & on for pages about pizzas made w/ flour tortillas. Really? He doesn't make his own dough? I consider myself a pretty lazy cook these days, but even I would not consider that an acceptable shortcut.

It is a pretty book, though-and all of the pictures of him fishing & out in the snow are fabulous.

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #32 of 42)

Jeez, sometimes you guys can be such a drag.


;·)


Marie Louise's picture

(post #62823, reply #33 of 42)

Uh, oh... is this the book you've chosen?

PS Heather, I looked at Tartine the other day in the bookstore. I had to look long and hard to even SEE the page numbers-and I was wearing my reading classes. It was daytime. That's the worst one yet. Still looks like a great book for the bakers, though.

schnitzel's picture

(post #62823, reply #34 of 42)

Yup, and I'm very excited about it. Really. I like the book a lot. And the way the recipe ingredients are written within the text doesn't bother me at all. In fact, it's similar to another cookbook, A Treasury of Great Recipes, by Mary and Vincent Price. I have made many recipes from that book so perhaps I've been desensitized. ;·)