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Braising book: Molly Stevens

Florida2's picture

I just picked up the book Braising by Molly Stevens at the library and cannot wait to read it tonight.


I bought a dutch oven (two actually, one for the oven, one for outdoors when no power from hurricanes) and someone suggested her book as a great place for recipe ideas.


Thnk you! If its super great, I'll order it from jessica biscuit since its on sale.

Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #1 of 25)

Make the braised cabbage--amazingly good. Along with anything else she cooks. The only problem for me would be the season--summer isn't for braising for me.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Sondra's picture

(post #62942, reply #2 of 25)

Gretchen is right, start with the braised cabbage.  I cook it a longer than she does, but it is really good.  And end of season green beans (even though it's just the beginning of the season, lol.)


Come back when you've read through it with questions, many here have cooked from it.  It's the first cookbook I pull off the shelf when the weather cools.  But there are many recipes that make great Summer cooking as well.

Geoffchef's picture

(post #62942, reply #3 of 25)

Another endorsement from me. Try the leg of lamb or the pot roast. I second everybody on the cabbage - I like it with red just 'cause it's prettier.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Jean's picture

(post #62942, reply #4 of 25)

Carrots look pretty good in with the green. :)





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Geoffchef's picture

(post #62942, reply #5 of 25)

Oh but they just don't match my napkin rings. (Try to imagine a little hair toss here.)

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Marie Louise's picture

(post #62942, reply #6 of 25)

eGullet had a long, long thread on this book, w/lots of pictures, a few years back. You might one to go over there and search for it.

Florida2's picture

(post #62942, reply #7 of 25)

I spent a lot of time studying the book-- It is a very "well done' cook book-pictures, good looking recipes, careful attention to describing technique.


I see why its a good winter book--many of the dishes cook for a long time in an oven. I defintely will try the dishes you pointed out. And more!

Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #8 of 25)

If I had to fault Molly for anything it would be the very very very detail of her recipes. It really is ALL about Braising!!  Having so much verbage describing the technique sometimes makes me have to re=read and re-read, because I can't get the "'pith"/overall direction in mind. But that is just me.


Yup, braising is all about a long time in the oven usually.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marie Louise's picture

(post #62942, reply #9 of 25)

I know what you mean. It was one of the books I gave away a few years back.

soupereasy's picture

(post #62942, reply #10 of 25)

I have also found her recipes as written have less "sauce/gravy" than I like.

Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #11 of 25)

Now, that, I don't think I have found.  I have usually been able to see if it looked too little, I could adjust. But I hate when it is so much juices that I think I have to concentrate, or it's just too "watery".  I haven't, of course, done every recipe to know which might be that way.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #62942, reply #12 of 25)

I have found many of her recipes to be somewhat dry. With a braise I expect some juice. Her flavours are great!

Heather's picture

(post #62942, reply #16 of 25)

I'm with you on the dryness. For her meat dishes I almost always double the amount of sauce--I have a husband that likes lots of sauce on his rice.

Marcia's picture

(post #62942, reply #18 of 25)

Your husband and mine must share a sauce gene. ;-)

Heather's picture

(post #62942, reply #19 of 25)

Mine loves braised dishes and is happy with a tiny bit of meat and lots of sauce--he's a cheap date!

Marcia's picture

(post #62942, reply #20 of 25)

A cheap date - just what you need, I'll bet. LOL

Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #21 of 25)

I'm not sure I know/agree with the lack of "sauce". I want "enough" but I don't want it to be too much. The Goldilocks syndrome.  So, I think I make it by the recipe, and then adjust as I go. If it looks dry, I'll add some more. BUT I want the sauce/gravy to be concentrated flavor for a braise.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #62942, reply #22 of 25)

It is concentrated, in some of her recipes to the point of dry. In a braise I like a bit of juice to gild my potatoes, polenta, noodles...;)

Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #25 of 25)

MIne isn't dry. And I like gravy. Maybe I just don't follow her directions so closely as to get it to dry. Everyone seems to have solved it to their liking.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Heather's picture

(post #62942, reply #23 of 25)

I make it concentrated, just more of it. I don't just add more liquid.

Marcia's picture

(post #62942, reply #24 of 25)

I'm sure the flavor is concentrated, believe me, but DH is a nut for gravy. There were times when it drove me round the bend, but I'm used to it now.

Interestingly enough, one of the reasons we needed so much gravy was that DH had an extremely active metabolism, and it was difficult for him to maintain a healthy weight without eating more than he wanted. Carbs with gravy or sauce seemed to be the answer for him, but when he turned fifty, things slowed down, and he's as happy about it as can be.

More than I planned to say, but I agree with you in theory.

Astrid's picture

(post #62942, reply #13 of 25)

I like the chicken braised with pears and rosemary, the cauliflower potatoes and peas Indian style, and my version of fennel braised with thyme and black olives. Nice recipes.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Gretchen's picture

(post #62942, reply #14 of 25)

Oh, dang, that cauliflower recipe may be the one I have been trying to find/remember for weeks now. I made it and it was just delicious. Thanks for the nudge.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Astrid's picture

(post #62942, reply #15 of 25)

For several weeks I have been blankly looking at the fresh cauliflower in the supermarket, this week I'm going to buy some! I enjoy it.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Heather's picture

(post #62942, reply #17 of 25)

It's a great book--we've enjoyed almost anything I've made from it.