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courgette's picture

Boulevard (post #62697)

I was wondering if anyone has Nancy Oakes cookbook Boulevard? Is it a book that I need? Beyond the I want it syndrome, I mean....


Mo

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #1 of 55)

The book has lovely recipes, gorgeous photos and is interesting reading, but it's definitely for more knowledgeable cooks who enjoy spending the time necessary to put together sophisticated dishes requiring several make-ahead components.  Some ingredients aren't easy to come by.  I have a number of recipes bookmarked, but I've yet to make one.  Log on to amazon.com and check out the reader's reviews, then decide if you need it. 

Wolvie's picture

(post #62697, reply #2 of 55)

agree. I'm glad I bought the book - a bunch of stuff is on my list. A shopping trip to the DC area next weekend will enable me to do so - the ingredients dilemma you mentioned really bites here in the panhandle of WV. :-)

 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

Ballottine's picture

(post #62697, reply #3 of 55)

You are an awful, awful person, Courgette.


Of course, I googled for Boulevard.  Amazon came up and paired Boulevard with Sunday Suppers at Lucques - my absolutely most favorite book de jour.  lol


They gave  Sunday Suppers to me for my Birthday last week, and I have not made anything from this book yet, but I read most of it, and so far I have no doubt that this is the the kind of food I like to make and eat.  I was going to ask whether anyone made anything from it.  (I am counting on Ashley. lol)


According to Amazon a copy of Boulevard is available  in a book store not far from me fo $50.   Well, I will just look.  Sunday Suppers came from Zooba, I wonder if Boulevards will make it there soon?  By the way, Giada's latest book will be available on April 4, they still have Patrick O'Connell's Refined American Cusine.  Good cookbooks tend to disappear very quickly from Zooba.   Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Barbara48's picture

(post #62697, reply #4 of 55)

See how much it is at Jessica's Biscuit. They discount up to 40% on new cookbooks.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62697, reply #5 of 55)

Amazon has it for $31.50,  Jessica for $31.49.  I want to buy it from Zooba for $9.95. LOL  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

KarenP's picture

(post #62697, reply #6 of 55)

 Do you have a Costco near you? I've seen it there but I don't remember the price.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62697, reply #7 of 55)

I did not see it at my Costco, but will look again.  Zooba spoiled me, so I will wait a bit, it might appear there soon.  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Gloriana's picture

(post #62697, reply #48 of 55)

Hi Bal: Have been collecting cookbooks for a long time, but have never heard of Zooba! I suffer from "I-can't-live-without-this-book" syndrome so PLEASE clue me in on what sounds like a great cookbook source.

MadMom's picture

(post #62697, reply #49 of 55)

Oooh, if you suffer from "I can't live without this book" then you've come to the right place.  There are enablers here, watch out for them, who will convince you that whatever the cookbook de jour is, you absolutely must have it.  That's how I ended up with four bookcases full and boxes in the basement.  I've never tried Zooba, but several others have, and they really like it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gloriana's picture

(post #62697, reply #51 of 55)

MadMom: I do believe we are kindred spirits! I too have a room shelved and full as well as boxes as well as books stacked on the floor. The scary thing is I know where everyone of them is! I just came from the Zooba.com site and Lord Help Me, but it has woken a potential monster!!! Ready to second mortgage the house or even consider selling one of the kids ... let's see which one is the most trouble ... Saw at least 10 books that I know I can't live without. This may be the start of something VERY BIG! LOL, LOL, LOL

Heather's picture

(post #62697, reply #50 of 55)

I just joined Zooba. It is great IF they have the books you want. Their stock apparently changes frequently, but there are many good cookbooks they don't carry right now. Check out the website and the booklists before you join. But you only have to buy 3 books at $9.95 before you can quit so it isn't a big commitment.


Edited 7/25/2006 10:06 am by Heather

Gloriana's picture

(post #62697, reply #52 of 55)

Hello Heather: Just came back from visiting Zooba.com. Feel like I'm in Heaven! At least 10 books I can't live without, and I didn't even get to the end of the list. Would be interested to know which books you chose and how they are working out.

Heather's picture

(post #62697, reply #53 of 55)

I just joined recently so I haven't actually received any books yet. My first book is Sunday Suppers at Lucques--it's been shipped.

Ballottine's picture

(post #62697, reply #54 of 55)

I don't know how it happened, but I missed your post and I apologize.


zooba is good, if you use it correctly, amazon liquidaton is also good  and Jessicas' biscuit's sales are good too.  If you have Costco, BJ's or Sam's near you, they can also be good.


I used to buy lots of text books for my college kids from HalfPrice.com, but they  changed hands and are not as good any more, but youcan still find good deals.


Most CT people are a lot more knowledgeable about book sources than I am.  I was introduced to Zooba by WiseKaren, I believe.  I considered it a Christmas present to me.  Pleasekeep in touch.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Gloriana's picture

(post #62697, reply #55 of 55)

Hi Bal: Sorry for the delayed reply ... things sorta piled up on me ...had Finals week for Summer Session and had to Read, Read, Read, College Final Exam Essays and get the grades in. (45 essays ... and not all of them good!) Thanx for your suggestions. Have been using Costco, Amazon, and Jes. Bisuits. But as you know-if you're a cookbook junkie (moi)-there never seem to be enough outlets for indulging! Don't hesitate to share any new titles you luv!

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62697, reply #11 of 55)

I like Sunday Suppers at Lucques - it was a recent gift. I have almost read it through and have cooked from it just a couple of times. Last night we had the Bay Scallops with Polenta, Wild Mushrooms, Sherry and Parsley Breadcrumbs.


She uses Taylor Bay Scallops, which are gorgeous locally (for me in MA, not for her in CA) farmed bay scallops, that are sold in the shells (VERY unusual here). They are, however, priced at about $10.99/dozen. That is a dozen BAY scallops, which, as you know, are about the size of a gumball. We have wonderfully sweet ordinary "dry"  bay scallops available here - mostly reasonably priced so I used those and the dish was lovely.


The style of the dishes and menus in this book is, in IMO, very similar to that of my other favorites like Jody Adams' In the Hands of a Chef and Judy Rodgers' Zuni Cafe Cookbook.



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 4/3/2006 10:01 am ET by Risottogirl


Edited 4/3/2006 4:48 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #14 of 55)

I've also been enjoyng this book.   The braised chicken with saffron onions, dates and fregola, and the herbed rack of lamb with flageolet gratin, tapenade and roasted radicchio are excellent.  Last night, I made the mustard/herb marinated pork roast, but totally forgot to make the mustard crumbs until it was too late.  I served it with sauteed chard with golden raisins and mashed butternut squash.  It was delicious, even wthout the crumbs.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62697, reply #15 of 55)

braised chicken with saffron onions, dates and fregola


That is the other recipe I made. It is delicious. I just adore fregola :)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #16 of 55)

I just adore fregola


We really like it too.  I was excited when I came across it recently at a little gourmet market.  I've used it in chicken soup and with the braised chicken recipe, but haven't seen anything else that calls for it.  How else do you use it?

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62697, reply #18 of 55)

Well, there is this one, 24443.5 which is always a hit when asked to bring a salad to a potluck or bbq or whatever.


And this one from Clothide:


http://chocolateandzucchini.com/archives/2004/10/fregola_sarda_with_zucchini_and_pinenuts.php


Fregola with Zucchini and Pinenuts, which has become my 7 year old niece's new favorite food. Not good news for my chef BIL, as fregola is scarce in their neck of the woods. He has experimented with other small pasta shapes, etc. So far only toasted israeli cous cous has come close and TRUST ME, that little girl still knows the difference. She calls it "ping pong zucchini". I have no idea why.


and Fregola with Clams




  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 large plum tomatoes, chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup fregola
  • 2 dozen littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley



  1. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and cook over moderately high heat until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chopped tomatoes and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the water and bring to a boil. Stir in the fregola, cover and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 17 minutes. 
  2. Add the clams to the skillet in a single layer. Cover and cook over moderately high heat until the clams open, about 4 minutes. Discard any clams that do not open. Season the fregola with salt and pepper. Spoon the fregola, clams and broth into shallow bowls. Sprinkle with the coarsely chopped parsley and serve at once.

Nancy Harmon Jenkins does a similar version of this classic sardinian dish , but uses sundried tomatoes instead.


It is also good in a salad with olives, oranges and arugula. 


edited because I couldn't get the link to be "hot" and read properly. I give up. Grrrrrrr



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

 


Edited 4/3/2006 4:22 pm ET by Risottogirl

Edited 4/3/2006 4:23 pm ET by Risottogirl

Edited 4/3/2006 4:49 pm ET by Risottogirl


Edited 4/3/2006 4:50 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #20 of 55)

Thank you so much!  I've been going through a mountain of back issues of food mags (I'm determined to save the recipes I want and give the mags away!) and came across Nancy Silverton's fregola tabbouleh.  Now I don't have to retype it.  The other 2 sound delicious, but I've noticed we seem to have similar likes and dislikes in food, so I'm not surprised.  Love the "ping pong zucchini" title from your niece, it's so much better than 'Fregola Sarda with Zucchini and Pine Nuts."  Ping Pong Zucchini it shall be! 

Ballottine's picture

(post #62697, reply #17 of 55)

 I served it with sauteed chard with golden raisins and mashed butternut squash


Susanne Goin's herb roasted pork is on my menu this weeklend.  Would you kindly direct me to the sauteed chard with golden raisins and mashed butternut squash recipe?  Thanks.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #19 of 55)

The squash and chard aren't in the book, they're both basic sides I've made forever.   The squash was simply halved, seeded, placed flesh side down in a roasting pan with barely enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, covered tightly with foil and baked at 375F until tender, then scooped from the skin into the fp and pureed.  I turned it into a bowl and I stirred in some melted butter and s&p.  You can add any flavoring you wish, such as maple syrup, brown sugar, minced herbs (sage is nice), curry powder (cook it in the butter before adding), ground coriander, etc.


I cut the chard leaves away from the stems, sliced the stems into pieces and simmered them in a little water until tender.  Meanwhile, I sliced the leaves in thick ribbons, washed and drained.  When the stems were almost done, I added the leaves and the raisins to the stems, covered the pan and braised until the leaves were tender, then drained and pressed gently to remove excess water; then I heated some olive oil in a saute pan, added garlic and the chard, sauteed until heated through and seasoned with s&p.  If the chard leaves are young and small (these were pretty large), I cook them like spinach, adding them to a saute pan with oil and garlic (raisins too) and let them wilt in the water clinging to the leaves; uncover the pan and raise the heat to boil off excess moisture and season with s&p.  The stems take longer, though, so those have to be simmered first.  Lightly toasted pine nuts can be added before serving.


Let me know what you think of the pork.  I used grainy Dijon, and we thought it was great -- a good dish for company. 

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #21 of 55)

For the squash, I forgot to add that you don't have to puree it in the fp; if you want more texture, you can simply mash it.  Doing it in the fp gives a smooth puree, which DH says reminds him of baby food (he prefers roasted chunks of squash, but I like a puree once in a while).

Wolvie's picture

(post #62697, reply #23 of 55)

I just ordered "Sunday Suppers..." when I ordered the Cakebread Cellars book. Should be here today.


Of course I ordered more than just those 2. One I have wanted for awhile is by Susur Lee.  It's called "A Culinary Life" more than just a recipe book - actually a set of 2. 


 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

Lee's picture

(post #62697, reply #24 of 55)

I'm not familiar with Susar Lee or the book, and I don't find it on Amazon or at Jessica's.  Who is she?  What are the books about?

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62697, reply #25 of 55)

HE is a chef in Toronto, born in Hong Kong. From what I understand, quite a master of fusion cuisine and very knowledgeable about the ancient culinary history of China.


He is also HOT :)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

courgette's picture

(post #62697, reply #26 of 55)

And married with child!


Mo

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62697, reply #27 of 55)

Just because someone is married and has kids doesn't mean he/she can't still be HOT, does it?


;)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

courgette's picture

(post #62697, reply #28 of 55)

Absolutely not! Just passing on info....


Mo