NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Baking with Julia

Seema_Shastry's picture

*
A CT Favorite. Lots of folks have had great successes from this book. These are a few that have had rave reviews. I'm sure folks will add many more to this list.

Rustic potato bread (in T&T)
rhubarb upside down baby cakes
Cranberry-pumkin-walnut bread

CLS's picture

(post #62589, reply #1 of 48)

*
I love this book. I haven't made one single thing in it that hasn't turned out perfectly.

A few other recipes that are essential:

Brioche, p. 43
Cranberry Walnut Pumpkin Bread, p. 108 (takes time, but oh, so worth it!!!!!!)
Challah, p. 93
Pecan Sticky Buns p. 190 (the best, most decadent sticky buns in existance - do this at holidays and your family will adore you!)
Danish Braid, p. 205
Croissant p. 185 (this is the best croissant dough I've ever made)
All of the "babycake" recipes
Cardinal Slice, p. 286 (you really have to make this. Very, very easy, delicious and impressive)
Oven Roasted plum cakes p. 255)
Creme Bruleed Chocolate Bundt (from which comes the perfect chocolate chiffon cake recipe. Should go in your permanent files)
Espresso profiteroles p. 411
Berry Galette p. 377
Alsatian Onion Tart p. 246

Just go get the book. If you like to bake, this book has more great, successful recipes than you will find in any other one book on baking.

Joni_'s picture

(post #62589, reply #2 of 48)

*
Hungarian Shortbread (don't have the book with me, so do not know the page #)

Wolverine's picture

(post #62589, reply #3 of 48)

*
I really enjoy this book as well. you get to see / have recipes from so many great folks, plus, all the asides!

bessieheath's picture

(post #62589, reply #4 of 48)

Oh, now you're talking.  This is a great book. 


I make the whole wheat loaves a couple times a week.  Best bread recipe I've ever made, bar none.  And that's saying something because I've made a LOT of bread in my lifetime.


Hungarian shortbread is out of this world.


The foccacia is the best. 


Just tried the Persian Naan the other day.  Very easy and terrific.


I can't think what else to rave about right now, but this is definitely a must-have book.


Sharon

Biscuits's picture

(post #62589, reply #5 of 48)

The whole wheat loaves are my favorite too.  


I haven't tried anything from that book yet that I didn't love.  The brioche is fantastic.


 

Ancora Imparo -

Wolvie's picture

(post #62589, reply #6 of 48)

Wow! You are really going thru the archives, eh? Still - it is a great book.


My fav everyday brioche is from The French Laundry. Silvertons is good, but to me, FL's is much better. Closer to CM's mousseline, which is absolute heaven.


"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Joni's picture

(post #62589, reply #7 of 48)

Who and what is CM mousseline?  I am having a "brain" fade.....please refresh my memory!!!!

Wolvie's picture

(post #62589, reply #8 of 48)

Hey Joni - here's the recipe - CM stands for Cookiemonster, who posted this a couple of years ago:


Handmade Brioche

Makes 1 Large mousseline brioche

For the floating sponge:
1 envelope dried yeast
1/2 C. sifted unbleached a/p flour
warm water (110 to 115 degrees) as needed

For the bulk of the dough
1/2 C. sifted cake flour
1 C. sifted unbleached a/p flour
3 large eggs, beaten
2 Tb. Milk of your choice, room temperature
2 to 3 Tb. Granulated sugar, to your personal taste
1/2 tsp. Salt
1/2 tsp orange flower water or
1 tsp. Ground cardamom
1 C. unsalted best quality butter, room temp. but still waxy, plus 1 1/2 Tb. To grease mold.

For the glaze
1 large egg yolk
2 Tb. Milk of your choice

Prepare the sponge starter:
In a small bowl mix the yeast and flour together. Gradually add enough warm water to make a medium-firm ball. Let warm water from the spigot run gently into the bowl to cover the sponge. Leave the bowl on the kitchen counter. The sponge will be ready to use when it floats to the surface of the water in a scant 8 - 10 minutes.

Prepare the bulk of the dough:
Mix the flours together in a large bowl, empty onto the countertop, and make a large well in the center. Add the eggs, milk, sugar, salt, and the chosen flavoring. Gradually work the flour into the liquid ingredients to make a soft ball. By the time this is ready, the sponge will also be. Spread your fingers open, pass your hand under the sponge, and let it drip a few seconds. Drop the sponge on top of the regular dough and mix them together, using your fingertips to pull the dough 2 inches above the counter several times to build a small amount of gluten.

Now, cut the butter into 4 equal pieces. Place one piece at the four poles of the brioche dough, and, using your thumbs, cream the butter until its texture is the same as that of the dough. Mentally divide the dough into four equal parts. Working very fast with your fingertips, gradually blend and emulsify each little mound of creamed butter into one quarter of the dough; the butter must disappear altogether into the dough, which itself must turn very pale yellow, almost white. Gather and homogenize the dough by pulling it energetically away from the counter 2 minutes or so to give it more elasticity, but do not overwork or the butter will break out of emulsion during the fermentation of the dough and while baking.

Using a pastry scraper, transfer the dough to a bowl and let it ferment, covered, at room temperature (72 degrees) until it has risen to 1 1/2 times its original volume, about 2 1/2 hours. Deflate the dough, rehomogenize it well with a few flip-flops of the hand, and put it to continue fermenting overnight on the lowest shelf of the refrigerator, covered.

The next morning, grease the mold, turn the dough into it, and let proof until the dough rises within 1/2 inch of the rim. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Beat the egg yolk and milk together. Brush the top of the bread twice with the egg wash. Bake the brioche 5 minutes at 425 degrees, reduce the heat to 375 degrees and finish baking until an instant thermometer inserted in the center of the brioche comes out hot and dry, another 20 to 25 minutes. Unmold the brioche immediately and let cool on a rack. It is wise to slightly overbake rather than underbake it so the crust is well set all around and stands firm when unmolded.


"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Joni's picture

(post #62589, reply #9 of 48)

Thank you!

whatscooking's picture

(post #62589, reply #22 of 48)

I just wanted to put in my two cents on this wonderful book as well.  I will have to make those chocolate cookies very soon after reading this thread.


Since the spectacular but short fruit season in almost upon us (midwesterners, that is).  I thought I'd mention that the blueberry-nectaring pie is very, very good. And I love the pie crust recipe.  It has just the right combination of shortening/butter - very easy to work, flaky and tasty.


Also, great photography.  The pictures make me salivate!

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

AJ12754's picture

(post #62589, reply #23 of 48)

You are SO right about the blueberry nectarine pie -- wonderful.


My husband and I also loved the challah bread -- and everything else we have made form this fabulous cookbook.


 


 

Cave obdurationem cordis

whatscooking's picture

(post #62589, reply #24 of 48)

Funny, I just made one of these yesterday.  I really like to make cherry right now because it is "blink and you'll miss it" sour cherry season.  But my husband, having had the cherry last week, requested blueberry-nectarine.  The addition of nectarines really helps the blueberries which can be cloyingly sweet, IMHO.


I've always wanted to make the sticky buns, made with a brioche from this book, but have never gotten around to it.  Have you made those?

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

KarenP's picture

(post #62589, reply #25 of 48)

I've always wanted to make the sticky buns, made with a brioche from this book, but have never gotten around to it.  Have you made those?

    I've never been more excited about anything I've ever baked than the first time I made those sticky buns.  They looked as good as the picture in the book and tasted even better. 

whatscooking's picture

(post #62589, reply #26 of 48)

Oh they just look fantastic.  One of these weekends, I'm going to make those.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

AJ12754's picture

(post #62589, reply #27 of 48)

I haven't made the sticky buns yet -- but my daughter and I are making the pound cake from Baking with Julia today and serving it tonight with vanilla ice cream and the roasted strawberry sauce from the last issue of FC.


I'll let you know how that turns out...

Cave obdurationem cordis

whatscooking's picture

(post #62589, reply #28 of 48)

Please do.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

AJ12754's picture

(post #62589, reply #29 of 48)

Well -- my family loved the Flo Braker vanilla pound cake from Baking with Julia --


To me it was a trifle bland (but I REALLY like vanilla and I didn't have really good vanilla in the house so I just used some old stuff I had around so maybe that explains it) and the texture was very light.  More cakey than pound cakey I thought.  Still -- hard to argue with VERY satisfied faces around the table.


I made mini-bundts instead of a large single bundt or loaf -- they looked beautiful and would definitely make the grade for a nice dinner party dessert. 


The roasted strawberry sauce made with vanilla sugar was lovely with the cake.

Cave obdurationem cordis

Adele's picture

(post #62589, reply #30 of 48)

I dont' know if you have a Costco in your area, but they had vanilla the last time I went (last month) and it's quite good.  I used it this weekend.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

soccermom's picture

(post #62589, reply #31 of 48)

I've looked at their vanilla but was never sure. If you've bought it, can you tell me the name? I'm sure they had a different supplier at the beginning of the year.


TIA


 


 

 

 

Adele's picture

(post #62589, reply #33 of 48)

I have no idea of the name, but like Gretchen said, it is Madagascar and it has a good strong flavor.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

deejeh's picture

(post #62589, reply #34 of 48)

I'm pretty sure it's not the vanilla that Gretchen and Adele mention.  If it's the same one as in my local Costco, it's got sugar and water in it as well as alcohol and vanilla essence.  I can't quite remember the name, but I think it starts with "R".  I've only ever seen this brand and Club House at Costco.


deej

Gretchen's picture

(post #62589, reply #35 of 48)

This one does begin with "R" but I read the ingredients and it is pure vanilla.  I'll look when I go downstairs.

Gretchen

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #62589, reply #37 of 48)

I'll be interested to hear.  I thought the one I saw in Costco was going to be just the ticket, and the price was certainly right.  It was a big disappointment to read the ingredient list :(


deej

soccermom's picture

(post #62589, reply #36 of 48)

Yes, I looked at the other day; it starts with R and has a flowery picture. I don't remember any specific country mentioned on it. I'm planning to stock up at TJ's in California, so I'll probably be ok for a while.

 


 

 

 

deejeh's picture

(post #62589, reply #38 of 48)

The one I'm thinking of comes in a brown plastic bottle, and has a white label.  Which Costco did you see it in?


deej

soccermom's picture

(post #62589, reply #39 of 48)

Warden and Ellesmere. It's brown plastic with white label, but I swear there was a drawing. But I could just be losing it .... :)

 


 

 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #62589, reply #40 of 48)

It's Rodelle. It is pure vanilla extract but does contain sugar. Alcohol is a given, isn't it. It is 55%.  I am not a baker nor a vanilla purist.

Gretchen

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #62589, reply #41 of 48)

I think Rodelle is the name of the one here, too.  That's really odd, cuz I'm sure I saw water and sugar among the ingredients, or otoh the heat could be addling my brain.  Now I'm gonna have to go back to Costco to check.  Yes, alcohol is a given.


deej


<edited to say, one doesn't usually see sugar in vanilla extract>


Edited 7/13/2005 5:52 pm ET by deejeh

Adele's picture

(post #62589, reply #46 of 48)

I checked all my vanilla's at lunchtime and they all, (sounds like I have hundreds- LOL), have sugar in them.  They also have water.  If they didn't have water, the alcohol would be 98 or whatever %, right?  No, that can't be right, because alcohol also has water.  Confused.  It just sounds like people didn't think there should be water or sugar involved.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

case4's picture

(post #62589, reply #47 of 48)

Okay, you got my curiosity up... my (expensive in Canada) Neilsen-Massey vanilla also has water, alcohol, sugar, and vanilla bean extractives (in that order). Interesting.