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Anyone have the bread bible?

helena's picture

By Rose Levy Beranbaum? I have the author's other baking books, and like them a lot (although recipes can be extremely time-consumning). Just wondering if anyone had a peek at it already!

RuthWells's picture

(post #62602, reply #1 of 87)

Hi Helena,


No, I don't have it yet, but as a huge Rose Levey B fan, it is going on my Christmas list!!  Do you have her holiday cookie book?  It's wonderful.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

helena's picture

(post #62602, reply #2 of 87)

Oh yes I do :0). I have the Cake bible and the Pie & Pastry bible as well.


Please tell me about your favorite recipes in the cookies book, I haven't tried a lot of those yet and would love to start.

RuthWells's picture

(post #62602, reply #3 of 87)

The mini-cheesecakes are my favorite so far, hands down.  Absolutely addictive.  Make both the cranberry and the lemon toppings -- divine!  The ginger pennies are also wonderfully addictive.  I didn't care for her lemon bars, but that's because they're not the same as my grandma's!  I like her recipe for gingerbread people, and managed (with a rolling pin cover and pastry cloth) to roll the dough so thin one year that we cut over 100 shapes...


Those are the off-the-top-of-my-head faves!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

helena's picture

(post #62602, reply #11 of 87)

Aah, no-one has to convince me to make cheesecake ;0). thanks for the suggestions, I appreciate it. (Wish I wasn't at work right now and could go home to turn up the oven!)

transona5's picture

(post #62602, reply #4 of 87)

Anyone care to wager whose bread recipes take longer? RLB's or Nancy Silverton's?


The cookie book is great. Personal favorites are:
Three-Nut Fingers
Lemon Poppyseeds
Filbertines(take note Assibams: great cardamom flavor)
Ginger Pennies

 


"If God had meant for cornbread to have sugar in it, he'd have called it cake." --Ronni Lundy


 

 

assibams's picture

(post #62602, reply #5 of 87)

Filbertines(take note Assibams: great cardamom flavor


And where is the recipe, huh!? ;-) Could you possibly post it, now that I have finally found a source (the organic food store in town) for shelled, unground, high quality cardamom.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

transona5's picture

(post #62602, reply #6 of 87)

Which would you prefer:volume or weight measurements? Ounces or grams? FP or Mixer method? Trying to lessen the typing here...

"If God had meant for cornbread to have sugar in it, he'd have called it cake." --Ronni Lundy


 

 

assibams's picture

(post #62602, reply #7 of 87)

Mixer method (don't own a FP), volume or weight is up to you, whichever is less to type. TIA


Edited to add a missing 'e'


Edited 10/28/2003 1:51:22 PM ET by Assibams

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

transona5's picture

(post #62602, reply #9 of 87)

(don't own a FP) 


D'oh! Well, somehow you'll have to finely grate/chop 1 cup unblanched whole hazelnuts.


Filbertines


unblanched whole hazelnuts  1C/5oz./142gms.
bleached all-purpose flour  1 1/3C(dip and sweep)/6.75oz./193gms.
baking soda  1/2t.
ground cardamom  1/2t.
salt  1/8t. or pinch
sugar  1/2C/3.5oz./100gms.
unsalted butter  8T/4oz./113gms.
one large egg
pure vanilla extract 1/2t /2gms.


Place oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Preheat oven to 350°F.


Place the hazelnuts on a cookie sheet and bake them, stirring occasionally, for 10 min. Cool completely.


Soften the butter. Grate the hazelnuts very finely. In a medium bowl, sift together half the grated nuts, the flour, baking soda, cardamom, and salt, then whisk to mix evenly. In a mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract until well blended. On low speed, beat in the flour mixture just until incorporated.


Scrape the dough into a bowl and refrigerate at least one hour but preferably no longer than 3 hours. Butter or grease 2 cookie sheets.


Measure the dough into a 1 1/4 inch scoop, two level teaspoons, or 1 scant tablespoon and knead each piece by flattening it between your palms and then rolling it into a 1 inch ball. Roll each ball, as soon as it is formed, in the reserves chopped hazelnuts until it is well coated. Place the dough balls 2 inches apart on the prepared cookie sheets. Bake for 15 minutes until lightly browned and firm to the touch. For even baking, rotate the cookie sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through the baking period. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack to cool, using an offset spatula or a pancake turner. Allow to cool completely. Store in an airtight container at room temperature or in the freezer. Keeps 1 month at room temperature, several months frozen. Makes about 3 1/2 dozen 


Notes: Allow the cookie sheets to cool completely before using for the next batch. Distribute the cookies evenly around the cookie sheet. Avoid crowding the cookies into one section of the cookie sheet, leaving a large area bare. 


 


"If God had meant for cornbread to have sugar in it, he'd have called it cake." --Ronni Lundy


 

 

assibams's picture

(post #62602, reply #12 of 87)

Thank you so much!

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

RuthWells's picture

(post #62602, reply #8 of 87)

Glad to find another Ginger Penny lover -- I made a batch for my brother's at-home post-wedding reception open house a few years back, and they got gobbled.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

helena's picture

(post #62602, reply #10 of 87)

Yay, thanks! These are on my list to try next ! The filbertines have always looked great to me (I love hazelnuts) but I don't know about the cardamom. Will have to try them. I see a cookie baking fest coming up ;0)

RheaS's picture

(post #62602, reply #13 of 87)

I ended up with The Bread Bible because I forgot to decline my feature selection for the Good Cook book club. I think I subconsciously decided to forget. I'm a RLB fan and wanted this book, but I had put a moratorium on cookbook buying for a couple of months. Anyway, I like the book so far. It will definitely be put to more use than Pie and Pastry Bible and possibly even Cake Bible. I made the Ricotta loaf and it was a very nice soft bread with a creamy flavour. Next on the list to try are: thin, flaky-looking foccacia, bialys, crumpets and english muffins. I like how the recipes for the last three yield 6 each. I don't mind scaling recipes up, but I find scaling down to be more cumbersome.


Silverton recipes take the longest compared to all other bread recipes I have ever seen and I've read plenty of bread-baking books.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62602, reply #14 of 87)

DH and I have been really enjoying The Bread Bible.  We've been having such great success with her recipes that DH suggested that we could get rid of all our other bread books (we have them all) and use RLB's exclusively! 


Many of her recipes make only one loaf, which we tend to like.  Otherwise, we end up with a freezer full of bread, since it's only the two of us.  There are a few editing problems that we've come across, and she's posted a few corrections on her web site.


Here are a few photos of our succeses.


Edited to try to add a photo of my favorite . . . Pugliese . . . so good!


 


Edited 2/3/2004 8:28:50 PM ET by favorablyimpressed

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MadMom's picture

(post #62602, reply #15 of 87)

Beautiful bread!  Perhaps I should use that as my incentive to stick to my diet until I lose half a sally...then I can start baking bread again!  I like the idea that the recipes are small; DH and I tend to eat whatever bread is here, particularly if it's nice and warm from the oven.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Jean's picture

(post #62602, reply #16 of 87)

The rye especially looks perfect! Oh dear, I feel another book buying binge coming on. Someone stop me!


 


Oh, dear, too late. I ordered it from half.com for $19.24 including shipping.  sigh-I am sooo weak!


Housework can't kill you, but why take the chance? - Phyllis Diller


Edited 2/3/2004 9:55:55 PM ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
RuthWells's picture

(post #62602, reply #17 of 87)

FI, those are gorgeous!  Nicely done!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

RheaS's picture

(post #62602, reply #18 of 87)

The ciabatta looks perfect -- lovely huge holes. I noticed the editing problems as well and was a little surprised. I've never noticed errors in my other RLB books. Thanks for telling us about the corrections on her website. I hope one of my local PBS stations will carry "Baking Magic with RLB." I'll probably try her brioche recipe this weekend. I've been comparing and baking different brioche recipes the last couple of weeks and have become addicted to brioche.

Jean's picture

(post #62602, reply #19 of 87)

Wow, I just checked out her site. That's a bunch of mistakes.


Seeing that I have the book coming, I'm grateful for the heads-up!


Housework can't kill you, but why take the chance? - Phyllis Diller

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62602, reply #20 of 87)

I hope one of my local PBS stations will carry "Baking Magic with RLB."


I wasn't aware that she had a PBS show.  That's wonderful news, although our local station has been showing reruns of the old regulars for years.  "Simply Ming" has just been added, for which I'm grateful.


RLB's Pain de Mie is nice, but her recipe calls for a 16" x 4" Pullman loaf pan.  I've never seen a Pullman pan that long.  Mine only measures 13 inches.  I loped off a few inches of dough, but I think it would have provided a tighter crumb if I had used the full amount in my 13" pan.  I'm wondering if that might have been a mistake.


The pumpernickle is such a good recipe.  I had frozen half and we made sandwiches out of it tonight.  A very nice flavor . . . lots of ingredients.


But, by far my favorite was the Pugliese.  Just the moistness I strive for in my breads.


We do use La Cloche Bread Baker on a few of her breads, such as the rye.  It provides a wonderful crust.


 


 

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Wolvie's picture

(post #62602, reply #21 of 87)

then try the one from the French Laundry. Very very good. Also try CM's mousseline brioche. By hand the first time - simply decadent.

"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

BondFBond's picture

(post #62602, reply #22 of 87)

Does the book give a recipe for whole grain/wheat bread?  My husband's trying to stop eating bread except whole grain (sigh).


I love Julia Child's book (and I love that she gives directions for using a mixer) but her wheat bread calls for white flour...

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62602, reply #23 of 87)

Without some white flour, your whole wheat bread will be very heavy.  RLB does have several breads that use whole grains, and all her recipes give instructions for both mixer and hand mixing.

BondFBond's picture

(post #62602, reply #24 of 87)

Without some white flour, your whole wheat bread will be very heavy.  RLB does have several breads that use whole grains, and all her recipes give instructions for both mixer and hand mixing.


I assumed (without really knowing) that the addition of the white flour may have been as you stated, but DH bought organic whole wheat bread at The Expensive Food Store (health food places) and even though it was heavier, it didn't seem "too much."  The labels don't say there's white flour...

Marcia's picture

(post #62602, reply #25 of 87)

Now, I may be mistaken about this, but completely whole grain breads which are nice and high, generally have gluten or something else added to aid in the rise. I used to make entirely whole grain breads in the dark ages, and none of them looked like the commercial loaves one sees. They were delicious, however, though the rest of my family would not agree.

RheaS's picture

(post #62602, reply #26 of 87)

How about trying the white whole wheat flour from King Arthur? It subs just fine for white flour in most recipes and it's supposed to be just as healthy as regular whole wheat. Another poster had posted about the white whole wheat before. Maybe Biscuit?

BondFBond's picture

(post #62602, reply #27 of 87)

Really; I do have the white whole wheat flour from King Arthur.  Will it rise just as well as white, etc.?  If it's just as healthy, I'll use that.  Thanks for the info.

cookie1's picture

(post #62602, reply #28 of 87)

What an impressive loaf of bread!  I live in Georgia and it is impossible to fine a decent loaf of bread. They don't have the slightest idea as to what a good crusty loaf of bread is like.  Everything has a hamburger bun consistency.  I wish I had the confidence to even try making a loaf of bread, but I am afraid of yeast.

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #62602, reply #29 of 87)

I wish I had the confidence to even try making a loaf of bread, but I am afraid of yeast.


Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Bread Bible would boost your confidence in no time.  She gives excellent instructions.  Baking bread is fun.  Give it a try.

cookie1's picture

(post #62602, reply #33 of 87)

I am taking a class next month to make dough for a pizza.  I am hoping that will give me some confidence.  I make dough for a pie but it is always touch and go when rolling and placing it in the dish.  My expectation for trouble is never wrong. I do intend to take a look at the bread bible because that ciabatta is just excellent.

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!