NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Alinea, anyone?

SallyBR1's picture

Alinea, anyone? (post #62966)

Not sure this book has been discussed - it seems to me some CTers might go for it (Ashley comes to mind)

the woman who did the blog on French Laundry cookbook will face ALinea as her second "full cookbook" project. Should be awesome!

"Her green thumb was so black, she couldn't even grow zucchini"



(Glenys, August 2008).
Lee's picture

(post #62966, reply #1 of 11)

I haven't spotted it yet, but I'm very interested in looking through it.  I can't see how there could be many recipes that are actually doable for the vast majority of home cooks, but it will no doubt be a very interesting read.  The blurb on Jessica's says it contains 100 dishes, 600 recipes and 600 photos and buyers will have access to a website with demonstration videos.  Access to the website alone may be worth the price of the book.     

ashleyd's picture

(post #62966, reply #2 of 11)

I've had mine on order for months and I had an e-mail just before I left saying that my signed copy will be with me shortly, so with a bit of luck it will be waiting for me on my return (along with #95 which still had not arrived).


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #62966, reply #3 of 11)

I am not at all surprised you already ordered it... :-)

you ARE sharing with us all your adventures cooking from it, right? I can hardly wait....

"Her green thumb was so black, she couldn't even grow zucchini"



(Glenys, August 2008).
ashleyd's picture

(post #62966, reply #4 of 11)

It depends if I use it to cook from (like the El Bulli cookbook) or just for inspiration (Gordon Ramsay 3* Chef). I'll keep you posted.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lee's picture

(post #62966, reply #5 of 11)

I looked through the book today and wish you much luck in attempting to cook from it.  I used to think Trotter's recipes were labor intensive!   ;^)


Seriously, all of the recipes are for dishes served at the restaurant and yield teeny weeny quantities.  There are components to various dishes that you might want to try, but many of the recipes require foodstuffs that I've never even heard of as well as ingredients that most of us ordinary humans will not be able to find, much less employ, such as calcium lactate, xanthum gum, glucose and various types of stabilizers.  Many of the recipes I read through require some special equipment, such as a dehydrator and a sous vide set-up, along with things that most of us already have, i.e. food processor, blender, etc.  The photography is terrific and presentations of the completed dishes are, of course, unique and gorgeous. 


I'm sure you'll enjoy reading and studying the book.  Keep us posted if you attempt to make anything.  It will be challenging, to say the least.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #62966, reply #6 of 11)

I am fortunate enough to be taking a wee course at BarbaraJo's with David Hawksworth (one of Vancouver's best):

"Catching up with Alinea
Thursday, November 27th, 6:30 pm
It will be an evening of details with Chef David Hawksworth who will dabble in some molecular gastronomy. This Vancouver Chef will demonstrate a menu from the Chicago restaurant Alinea's debut book. Catch up with Alinea's groundbreaking techniques and technology. David will take guests far from the comfort zone of their mothers' kitchens at this enlightening and exciting event"

Life is good.

Cheers,

Peter

 


Better life through Zoodles and poutine...
Debby's picture

(post #62966, reply #7 of 11)

most of us ordinary humans will not be able to find, much less employ, such as calcium lactate, xanthum gum, glucose and various types of stabilizers


I would check out a health food store for these..............I was amazed at what one of our local health stores carried when I was looking to find items for some vegan dishes I wanted to try for a niece.


Debby

thecooktoo's picture

(post #62966, reply #9 of 11)

>calcium lactate, xanthum gum, glucose and various types of stabilizers<


Boy, does that sound like an oxymoron or what when you can find them at the health food store...wonder if they are all organic!  ;-O


Jim

ashleyd's picture

(post #62966, reply #10 of 11)

Oh dear, I really did expect better from you, there is nothing unusual or unnatural about those ingredients, a raising agent (like baking powder), a common thickening agent and good old sugar. Calcium lactate occurs very naturally as crystals in some cheeses. Everything we eat has a chemical composition, but just because we don't know what it is we think because it's called "meat" or "vegetable" or "fruit" the underlying structure must be OK. Or would you suddenly take fright if I stopped calling it salt and called it sodium chloride?


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #62966, reply #11 of 11)

Didn't you see my smiley face, Ashley...tried to make it as facitious as possible.  I thought it was pretty funny taking those names for common ingredients and...oh well, I tried.


Jim


Edited 11/1/2008 3:31 pm ET by thecooktoo

ashleyd's picture

(post #62966, reply #8 of 11)

It finally arrived and it is at the very least a beautiful book, incredibly high production values and at the price a bargain for a book of this quality. Oh, you wanted to know about the contents? At first glance there do not appear to be too many strange ingredients (although there are enough), and only a few specialised pieces of equipment, although he seems to make great use of the dehydrator and vacuum sealer. Most of the dishes are multi-element and although most elements in themselves don't seem too bad, in some cases the number of elements you have to put together runs (well) into double figures (can you say "Thomas Keller"?). But we are not running restaurants or accepting paying guests so we don't have to use everything he suggests so for home use only putting together a few of the elements would yield an interesting dish, and some of the ideas are well worth considering in other contexts, for instance he makes a "salmon dust" by grating a piece of frozen smoked salmon and I can think of at least half a dozen uses for a garnish/flavouring like that. I shall have fun exploring!



Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.