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Yikes!! al-Qaida in the kitchen!!

bayouelton's picture

In doing cookware research for my new hybrid induction cooktop I read reports of homeowners saying they've had pots and pans literally blow up in their face and melt aluminum all over the place. Is this a hoax? Somebody's idea of a joke? Has anybody heard of this? The brand that was mentioned was Emeril.

Ozark's picture

(post #56295, reply #1 of 44)

I had indunction for 12 years and never had any problems. I find it hard to believe there is a problem with Emeril. Its made by All-Clad which IMHO is the best.


You may have been to this site, wonderful resource if not.


http://theinductionsite.com/induction-cookware.shtml


Love this quote.


"You don't always get what you pay for, but you never get what you don't pay for."


 


 I have made a lot of money in my life. Most of it I spent on women and boats. The rest I simply wasted!!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

bayouelton's picture

(post #56295, reply #2 of 44)

Sorry if I confused the issue by mentioning the fact I had a hybrid induction (that means both types of burners). The issue I was talking about had nothing to do with induction. Those consumers were using regular, old fashioned gas and electric type cooktops. Since I have a hybrid I'm going to need cookware that works on both types of burners, induction and electric resistance type burners. The site I was reading the complaints on may or may not have been a reputable site. But for what it's worth it was:


www.consumeraffairs.com


I do subscribe to Consumer Reports so I guess I probably should have checked them first. Thanks for the input, though. Much appreciated.

Heather's picture

(post #56295, reply #4 of 44)

This report from the Consumer Product Safety Commission says that empty or near-empty aluminum pots, if overheated, can melt.

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5015.html

Jean's picture

(post #56295, reply #5 of 44)

After 50 plus years of cooking in aluminum pans, I don't think I'll waste much sleep worrying about this. :/


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Marie Louise's picture

(post #56295, reply #6 of 44)

But induction works by "agitating the molecules" or some such thing. You could see how it could just melt the whole pan in a really scary way!

Heather's picture

(post #56295, reply #7 of 44)

I don't think induction works with aluminum at all--don't the pans have to be magnetic?

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #11 of 44)

Yes, but it can be a layered core, like All-Clad.

Heather's picture

(post #56295, reply #14 of 44)

I get that, but would those layered pans melt like this? I thought the problem was with fully aluminum pans but maybe I'm wrong. Wouldn't be the first time! ;-)

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #15 of 44)

Where I've seen this happen there's been a cladding of aluminum to stainless, providing a layer of metal that heats evenly, which of course stainless doesn't. Paderno made in Canada has an aluminum plate attached to the base of their cookware and it's not uncommon when a series of mistakes align, to have the slab detach and possibly melt. I've never seen this happen with normal, even rigorous use, but chances are, some accidents are the results of bad habits. My guess is the stainless gets so hot, it causes the aluminum to melt or detach. As Jean said, lots of aluminum pots exist out there in the world and they're not melting.

bayouelton's picture

(post #56295, reply #16 of 44)

OK everybody (except Glenys), listen up here. Sorry I said induction. This is a safety issue now. P-u-l-e-e-z-e FORGET  induction. The pots blowing up and causing injuries, if I understood that web site correctly, has absolutely NOTHING to do with induction. So maybe solid aluminum pots can last for 50 years in a Bessemer Blast Furnace with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Who knows. What I do I know, or at least think I know, is that maybe what causes the unsafe condition is when aluminum is sandwiched in between other metals. And some companies do this worse than others. I'll look into it further and if I find out something different I'll get back with you. Promise.

Edited 12/7/2008 7:56 pm ET by bayouelton


Edited 12/7/2008 7:58 pm ET by bayouelton

bayouelton's picture

(post #56295, reply #17 of 44)

thecooktoo's picture

(post #56295, reply #19 of 44)

It is my opinion that any cookware can be abused.  And when it is strange things happen.  Heat a cast iron pan to searing hot and drop in an ice cold steak and there is a good chance the pan will crack.  Is that the fault of the pan, no, it's the fault of less than intelligent useres.


My DSIL admitted when he melted the bottom out of the Emerilware pan that it was his fault...he put it on the stove with nothing in it, on high, then went to the freezer in the garage to get something else, got distracted and was gone for 4 or 5 minutes.  That is abuse, cookware is not designed to be abused at very hgih temps for a long periof of time.


BTW, on the link that you provided, I question why the  built in link from that very bad review of Emerilware goes to a local lawfirm in the town directly adjacent to where I live.


Just curious.


Jim

bayouelton's picture

(post #56295, reply #25 of 44)

BTW, on the link that you provided, I question why the  built in link from that very bad review of Emerilware goes to a local lawfirm in the town directly adjacent to where I live.


Just curious.


Jim


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Very observant. I dunno'.


 

thecooktoo's picture

(post #56295, reply #8 of 44)

All the induction cook tops I've seen work the same way.  First they won't work with aluminum at all, unless it is sandwiched between two pieces of SS that will work with a magnet.  Second, they all (again that I am aware of) sense whether anything is in the pan and shut down if the pan is empty.  So if you want to heat oil to fry, the oil has to go in first.


I was at my DD's house a few weeks ago and DSIL was cooking something in a large Emeril ware pot.  Left it on the stove on high...empty...and it melted the aluminum pad in the sandwiched bottom and molten aluminum ran down onto the burners.  The store immedately replaced the pan.


Needless to say, any pan treated that way is going to melt.


Jim

Gretchen's picture

(post #56295, reply #9 of 44)

DH can attest to the melting properties of aluminum. He had a roommate when he was a resident who was learning to play classical guitar. Harry would sit and practice by the hour.  DH came home one day to an odd acrid odor, Harry pickin' in the living room, tea kettle at half mast on the full blast burner!


"Agitation of molecules" is  the mechanism for microwave heating properties. Maybe that is what ML is thinking about.


Gretchen


Edited 12/7/2008 2:46 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #10 of 44)

Can't melt the pan, the pan is only as hot as the food.

wonka's picture

(post #56295, reply #20 of 44)

As a teenager, I melted an aluminum kettle to the stove. I had put the kettle on for a cup of tea and then, forgetting that I had ever wanted tea, I went out. Remembered about an hour later and called the neighbours. They turned off the burner but the kettle was a melted blob on the stovetop. The house sure stunk and, luckily, I hadn't burnt it down.

Heather's picture

(post #56295, reply #21 of 44)

We hosted the dinner for our neighborhood block party one year. While everyone was outside eating someone came in, turned the gas on High under my copper kettle, then went out and joined the party.

Same result as yours.

wonka's picture

(post #56295, reply #22 of 44)

It happened to the guy next door, from the basement suite, I saw the smoke and recognized the smell and sent him running back into his suite. Too late to save the pot though.

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #13 of 44)

You have lots of choice if you go with a wrapped layered core, like All-Clad stainless or a similar manufacture. I'm fond of the Cuisinox Elite, very well made. You want magnetic for the induction, very flat on the bottom for best contact with either heat source and the rest is up to you. Of course cast iron works just fine.


Edited 12/7/2008 5:00 pm by Glenys

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #12 of 44)

All the Emeril lines of cookware are manufactured overseas, not in the American plant, unless that's changed recently.

Ozark's picture

(post #56295, reply #18 of 44)


BAM™! Now You're Cookin' Like a Pro!EMERILWARE™ is the brand of gourmet cookware created by celebrity Chef Emeril Lagasse with All-Clad Metalcrafters, America's premier cookware brand. Whether cooking at his internationally acclaimed restaurants or on his phenomenally successful TV show, Emeril Lagasse is known for his unrivaled standard of culinary excellence. Now everyone can own cookware that is the Essence of Emeril

 


 I have made a lot of money in my life. Most of it I spent on women and boats. The rest I simply wasted!!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #23 of 44)

If you're inferring that they're made in America, it's not stating that either. I received a complimentary set of Emerilware when it was first launched, as a tester, and it's made overseas. All-Clad has other pieces, like the pasta/drainer pot that's made offshore.

Glenys's picture

(post #56295, reply #24 of 44)

15. What is the difference between All-Clad and Emerilwareª ?

All-Clad cookware is mainly made in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. All-Clad offers the best in professional cookware and utensils, for an ultimate cooking experience.

Emerilwareª is the result of the successful collaboration between All-Clad and Chef Emeril Lagasse, and offers high-quality authentic cookware.

All Emerilwareª products are made to the high All-Clad quality standards and withstand Emeril's test kitchen trials.

Emerilwareª is made in China.


Edited 12/8/2008 1:27 pm by Glenys

Marie Louise's picture

(post #56295, reply #3 of 44)

Having a vague understanding of how induction works, it does seem plausible. I've never heard of it happening, though, so I guess the moral of the story is only use the types of pots and pans recommended by the manufacturer of your stove!

I think induction sounds like a really cool thing to have. I considered it when I remodeled my kitchen, but it took me so long to get used to how to cook on a high BTU stove that I did not want to relearn a new method. (I burned just about everything for 6 months when I first got my Wolf stove. High on that was not the same as high on any previous stove, LOL.)

pemnel's picture

(post #56295, reply #26 of 44)

I read through the posts on the link you provided and the question that comes to my mind is this;  If their pan's bottom is at the required 1200 plus degrees that it takes to create "molten aluminum" then how can they have water just boiling in the pan? Wouldn't it be producing high pressure steam at that point. 


I just can't believe that the pans weren't being cooked dry if they are melting.  I'm not familiar with the construction of Emerilware, so maybe the bottoms are suffering from some sort of de-lamination and just falling off.  I also can't believe that Emerilware (and by association All-clad) wouldn't be falling all over themselves to correct such a problem, and if they weren't, that lawyers wouldn't be setting up kiosks next to the Emerilware displays at every department store in town!


 


 

thecooktoo's picture

(post #56295, reply #27 of 44)

ITA, but most people are not going to want to appear stupid enough to boil a pot completely dry and have it melt the aluminum core, so they will maintain that the pot had plenty of water in it, and it "just happened."  Just like my 5 year old grandson, " I don't know, Grandpa, it just happened!" With a giant shrug of the shoulders!


Jim

Gretchen's picture

(post #56295, reply #28 of 44)

I have an Emeril 3qt pan--nice pan. There is NO way it could melt or explode unless it was left empty and HOT!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
bayouelton's picture

(post #56295, reply #29 of 44)

From: 
pemnel  
Dec-9 3:59 am 

To: 
bayouelton
 (27 of 29) 

 
42986.27 in reply to 42986.1 

I read through the posts on the link you provided and the question that comes to my mind is this;  If their pan's bottom is at the required 1200 plus degrees that it takes to create "molten aluminum" then how can they have water just boiling in the pan? Wouldn't it be producing high pressure steam at that point. 


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I agree.  I can't prove anything, of course, because I wasn't there.  Personally, I don't think there's a stove in the world that can melt aluminum.  I think it must have been something else in the pan's "laminated" layers.  The only thing that matters to me is that something bad happened.  Just a thought, that's all.
Gary's picture

(post #56295, reply #30 of 44)

Flame temperature for propane is 3,614, for natural gas 3254 degrees Fahrenheit.
http://www.propanecarbs.com/propane.html

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