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Y-shaped peelers--do you like them?

annieqst's picture

I was given a kyocera y-shaped peeler and have tried it a couple of times, rotating the head, not rotating. Maybe it's a learning process, but I find I'm still partial to my old $1.49 peeler. For those of you who have them, what do you think of them?

Harborcon's picture

(post #55041, reply #1 of 36)

don't like y-shaped peelers.  love my OXO that is held at a right angle to carrots, cukes, etc., and directed away from me' and parallel to a potato, apple, etc., and directed toward me.  don't know if that's right; it's what my mama did.

Adele's picture

(post #55041, reply #2 of 36)

I took off most of a fingernail the first time I used one.  It went right in the trash.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #55041, reply #3 of 36)

I have a kyocera ceramic Y peeler.  Total piece of crap

knitpik's picture

(post #55041, reply #4 of 36)

Maybe it's a question of what you are used to and how it fits in your hands. I must have a dozen peelers but use the Y ones only. Wish I could find the same one I bought in HK - actually it was made in Japan. It's my favorite one and it's getting old. It feels very comfortable in my hand.

RheaS's picture

(post #55041, reply #12 of 36)

I use a Henckels Y-peeler and it's the only one I use now. I find I can peel things much faster. I did like my old oxo straight one because it had a comfortable handle, but my Y-peeler is sharper and doesn't take off as much flesh.

knitpik's picture

(post #55041, reply #15 of 36)

Henckels...this one is missing in my collection. Will have to look.

RheaS's picture

(post #55041, reply #20 of 36)

I found mine at TJ Maxx.

RuthWells's picture

(post #55041, reply #5 of 36)

I love my Y-peeler and never use the standard one anymore.  It's just quicker and easier for me.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

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Cissytoo's picture

(post #55041, reply #7 of 36)

I love my Y-peeler and never use the standard one anymore.  It's just quicker and easier for me.


Ditto what RuthWells said.  Mine is by Hoffritz.  I hold it like a pencil to peel stuff.

MadMom's picture

(post #55041, reply #9 of 36)

I've never tried one, but suppose it is all in getting used to it.  I know when I first tried my Rosle can opener, I didn't like it at all, but now it's my "go to" can opener.



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Glenys's picture

(post #55041, reply #6 of 36)

Once you learn to hold the food you're peeling differently, it's more efficient and you can articlulate the pull. For example, start at the stem of the pear and pull down in nice firm pulls and the pear looks peeled and completely natural. By holding a potato firmly in one hand, the peeler takes off much more peel, safely, than all those flicking motions everyone uses.
It's Y shape all the way for me, usually Kuhn Rikon but now that they've gone stainless I look for whatever has a carbon blade.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #55041, reply #8 of 36)

usually Kuhn Rikon but now that they've gone stainless


oooh really? I'll have to be more careful with my KR peelers since I won't be able to replace them. I have 4, all with carbon blades. I think they were in my Christmas stocking MANY years ago.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Beebs's picture

(post #55041, reply #13 of 36)

I also have a Kuhn Rikon y-peeler and adore it. Always had trouble with the $1.49 cheapo peelers, and I've wondered if it had something to do with being left-handed.
I don't know if the ceramic ones are as good as the K-R ones. I would buy anything made by K-R. They know what they are doing.

Sandy

knitpik's picture

(post #55041, reply #16 of 36)

I have the KR garlic press and love it. It should last a lifetime.

Gracew's picture

(post #55041, reply #23 of 36)

Now, I can go on a tangent about garlic presses.  I've never understood it.  Why would anyone mess with cleaning all those tiny holes to do the job that one good whap with the side of a chef's knife will do?

knitpik's picture

(post #55041, reply #25 of 36)

I've tried that with a chef's knife and with a cleaver but I can never smash it good. I suppose I don't have enough stregth or something.
Anyway, whatever works for you. I like my garlic press and the KR one is a breeze to clean. So there.;-)

Gretchen's picture

(post #55041, reply #26 of 36)

We have had discussions along this line and I, for one, have zero trouble cleaning my garlic press. 
When I got a microplane I began using that for garlic--and ginger. 
And Glenys came along and educated us all about the differences that the method of cutting the garlic lend--stronger when pressed as I recall, milder when minced with a knife.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #55041, reply #27 of 36)

Yup, the smaller the chop, the stronger the flavor.  A friend's Italian mother taught me that many years ago.  She added it whole to some recipes and sliced, chopped, minced and pressed it for others.  That woman could really cook!

TracyK's picture

(post #55041, reply #33 of 36)

Two reasons I use a garlic press: 1) Whacking with a chef's knife produces smashed/crushed garlic, not minced or finely chopped... and it takes me way long to chop to as fine a dice as I sometimes want it, and 2) I cannot stand having garlic smell on my fingers, so the less I have to touch it the better. :-)


Also, I find it about as difficult to clean as a teaspoon, LOL.


I do mince it for garlic/oil sauce for pasta.


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Gracew's picture

(post #55041, reply #22 of 36)

She said what I was thinking better than me.  DH insists on using a paring knife & half the veggie goes in the trash.  Y peelers rule!  As for peeling tomatoes, I can do that just fine by using my Y-peeler in little horizontal back & forth moves as I pull the blade toward me.


Edited 1/26/2006 10:19 pm by Gracew

Lee's picture

(post #55041, reply #24 of 36)

As for peeling tomatoes, I can do that just fine by using my Y-peeler in little horizontal back & forth moves as I pull the blade toward me.


That's how I used to peel tomatoes, and it works fine, but you should try a serrated peeler on tomatoes.  It's much faster.  It doesn't matter much if you're only doing a small number of tomatoes, but when I make a quantity of raw sauce or salsa, and I don't want to apply heat in order to remove the skins, this peeler makes a tedious job much, much easier. 


Edited 1/27/2006 11:41 am ET by lee

Ricks503's picture

(post #55041, reply #28 of 36)

I have the OXO Y peeler and really like it - Mine has a nice sized removeable rubber handle that is very comfortable.  I will admit that it took maybe 10 minutes of use to get used to pulling the peeler instead of pushing it and that I did nick myself 1-2 times during the first dozen or so uses, but I will NOT go back to a regular peeler without protest.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

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annieqst's picture

(post #55041, reply #29 of 36)

Is THAT how you're supposed to use them? ...by pulling? I'll see if that improves my feelings about it.

Ricks503's picture

(post #55041, reply #30 of 36)

Especially with potatos, hold in one hand and then start at the top and pull twords you - I find it gives you better control and I get nice long peelings. I will even pause at the bottom and then turn it end for end to get the peel in one long circle from north to south to north again and then finish up the sides. but then I am easily amused.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Lee's picture

(post #55041, reply #31 of 36)

I get nice long peelings. I will even pause at the bottom and then turn it end for end to get the peel in one long circle from north to south to north again and then finish up the sides.


Tee hee -- I thought I was the only one who did that.

Adele's picture

(post #55041, reply #32 of 36)

Is THAT how you're supposed to use them?


LOL.  I had no idea.  (Still not buying another though, I can still feel the pain :)  )


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

MrsRussell's picture

(post #55041, reply #10 of 36)

Up until relatively recently, "Y" peelers were the only type of peeler available in these parts - so when I visited places outside the country, I would always pick up a few 'regular' peelers.


'Y' peelers are fine for peeling potatoes, pears or any 'roundish' form that sits comfortably in the hand however, it's much easier, and faster IMHO to peel a long shape eg a carrot with a straight peeler.


shelly in Jerusalem

NanaC's picture

(post #55041, reply #11 of 36)

We have one of each kind and use them for different things.  They are both Oxo, the ergonomic kind.  The narrow one is used for carrots, smaller potatoes, etc., while the 'Y' peeler is used for butternut squash and other large veggies.  We love them both!

Fran


"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

JillElise's picture

(post #55041, reply #14 of 36)

I find the Y peeler so much faster than the others.


Jill Elise Vancouver BC
Lee's picture

(post #55041, reply #17 of 36)

I love them for all the reasons Glenys stated, and I agree with Mean that the Kyocera ceramic  peeler is junk.  I find them indispensable for peeling thick or hard skinned foods, such as butternut squash.  That said, however, I adore the new serrated swivel peeler for tomatoes and thin skinned fruits.  I can peel an apple or pear in the blink of an eye and end up with one, long peel, but, if I want to leave some of the peel intact, such as leaving a "cap" on pears to be poached, I reach for the "y" peeler.  It gives me better control.