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Wooden Spoons

kitchenqueen907's picture

Does anyone have a good trick for clean wooden spoons?  I don't want to put them in the DW and I'm uncomfortable using soap, especially for the ones I use with chocolate.  Anyway suggestions will be appreciated.  Thanks. 

Gretchen's picture

(post #56033, reply #1 of 28)

Scrub with a plastic scrubby and rinse. Personally, I put mine in the top rack of the dishwasher. Mine cost about 50 cents each so whatever happens happens.


I'll have to let the choclatiers answer about the chocolate spoons.


Gretchen


Edited 2/23/2008 8:17 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Regality's picture

(post #56033, reply #2 of 28)

Been tossing mine into the DW for over 40 years with no problems. 


 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/



FL.Cook's picture

(post #56033, reply #17 of 28)

Me too!!

Carole
kitchenqueen907's picture

(post #56033, reply #18 of 28)

How interesting.  Tonight I made the Mac & Cheese from FC #91 and throughout the recipe they recommend using wooden spoons - I used my good 'ol Vollrath plastic because I knew it would be heat resistant and easy to clean-up. 


FYI - I did use my electric sander and smoothed all of my spoons and have rubbed them with mineral oil.  They look super-duper and like new. 


 

FL.Cook's picture

(post #56033, reply #20 of 28)

I honestly do not use wooden spoons too often, as I usually use my spatulas that are heat resistant, but when I do use them I always end up with them in the DW.

Carole
Gary's picture

(post #56033, reply #3 of 28)

Use a nylon scrub brush and hot water. Do not soak them. Dishwasher will work too.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

mer's picture

(post #56033, reply #4 of 28)

hot hot water, salt and a plastic scrubbie, like scotch brite.  Use rubber gloves so you can stand really hot water.  Then air dry.

Lazio1954's picture

(post #56033, reply #5 of 28)

Like everyone else, very hot water and a scrubby. I have some really nice ones (hand turned) olive wood and I would not through them in the dishwasher. My wooden spoons like my spatulars are marked savory and sweet and do not cross over.


Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
Wolvie's picture

(post #56033, reply #6 of 28)

I have a lot of olive wood spoons. I treat them every so often (around once a month) with food grade mineral oil, just as I do my cutting board.


I wash them with warm soapy water, rinse, then air dry. I don't keep them segregated per se - use is based on shape / what I am doing.


I've never had a problem with soap transfer or savory vs sweet transfer.


 


The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."


- Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

 

chiffonade's picture

(post #56033, reply #7 of 28)

DW for me and if I don't do that, I use a dobie pad.  If the food stains like beets, I wash the spoon to the best of my ability and remind myself that beet juice is a natural dye. 

"Sandra Lee is the Culinary Anti-Christ and I am the Anti-Sandra Lee.  The precious moments you may take to measure a level cup of flour are NOT wasted time!"


Chiffonade

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

kitchenqueen907's picture

(post #56033, reply #8 of 28)

Thank you everyone for your input.  I have hand-tooled and inexpensive spoons and have never had a problem with transfers of soap or spices.  I just noticed that the chocolate was a little more difficult to cut through and wondered what others have done.  I'll continue to put inexpensive in the DW and hand-wash my good ones - which I do not use for chocolate. 


Thanks again.  Laurie

Wolvie's picture

(post #56033, reply #9 of 28)

there was a tip at CT not long ago - folks sprayed their spoons with pam or something similar before using for honey, choc, etc. That works - makes  clean up breezy. :-)

The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."


- Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

 

thedessertlady's picture

(post #56033, reply #10 of 28)

Dishwasher. Never had anything happen to any of mine and some were my grandmothers.

Adele's picture

(post #56033, reply #11 of 28)

It never entered my mind NOT to use soap.  Why wouldn't you?  I even use bleach if they are really stained.


So I bought myself an orbital sander for my cutting boards.  Looking around, I spied my wooden spoons, things with wooden handles.  Had a fun hour or so sanding and smoothing, then bleaching & drying in the sun.  Then I put mineral stuff on them like I do my cutting boards.  Result?  Brand new looking spoons! (and handles without Sharpie marks on them)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

kitchenqueen907's picture

(post #56033, reply #12 of 28)

You are so inspiring...I have a sander and will start my cleaning/smoothing process tomorrow.  Chocolate has been my biggest concern - tempering chocolate for truffles especially.  I have found that after time the wood does get rough edges and will even splinter, especially when using scrubbers on them.


CT is phenomenal - I always know I will get an answer.  Thank you, ALL, for you help.  L

Adele's picture

(post #56033, reply #13 of 28)

You will be amazed what a little sanding will do for all your wooden kitchen stuff, esp. cutting boards. (Don't forget to oil after)  This is my first ever powertool.  The guys at work teased me to no end over my little Ryobi 2.5 orbital sander.  Next up is a table saw.  hahahahaha!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #56033, reply #14 of 28)

Makita cordless drill. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Geoffchef's picture

(post #56033, reply #26 of 28)

DeWalt 18 V. More power! (Insert Tim Allen grunty noises here)

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #56033, reply #27 of 28)

I don't know about the power but the Tim Allen reference is so funny. That was a great little 'window'.

Gretchen

Gretchen
msm-s's picture

(post #56033, reply #21 of 28)

if you sand them, be sure to finish sanding with a very fine grit. otherwise, you will leave a surface that collects more germs than you realize. i would not use lower than 220, and recommend 600.

Adele's picture

(post #56033, reply #22 of 28)

Exactly.  Use the lower grit if it's really rough, the higher grit to smooth.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Gretchen's picture

(post #56033, reply #23 of 28)

If you use a really high grit you can actually burnish the wood so it is almost impermeable--the reason stain sometimes does not "take" on a piece of wood.

Gretchen

Gretchen
chefd's picture

(post #56033, reply #15 of 28)

Like wolvie I use olive wood.  Cost is a little more but they last longer.  We always just put them in the DW even a commercial Hobart (195 degrees) and air dry.  They are a tool in my mind and tools wear out. 


Chefd


Edited 2/25/2008 3:38 pm ET by chefd


Edited 2/25/2008 3:38 pm ET by chefd

Florida2's picture

(post #56033, reply #16 of 28)

My trick is to pitch them out and only buy plastic. I see wood as a place to harbor bacteria--just me.

Regality's picture

(post #56033, reply #19 of 28)

FYI--http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/



MEANCHEF's picture

(post #56033, reply #24 of 28)

I had a very bad experience with wooden spoons in the dishwasher.  A spoon must have fallen from the upper rack and landed across the heating element on the bottom of the dishwasher.  It started a fire.  No more wood in the dhshwasher for me.

Gretchen's picture

(post #56033, reply #25 of 28)

yep, done that one too. No real problem, thankfully.

Gretchen

Gretchen
awn's picture

(post #56033, reply #28 of 28)

I always toss mine in the dw.  They seem to last forever- well allmost.