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While I'm at it . . . what about pot ...

nihon_no_cook's picture

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New kitchen has a small (3' square) island, which looks to me to be begging to have a pot rack installed over it, especially since I'm not going to be overwhelmed by the amound of cabinet space I have. Any suggestions on what to look for in a pot rack, and some good suppliers? I'm probably going to end up purchasing one via mail order, or from a home improvement center, if that makes any difference when you offer your suggestions.

TIA for your help!

CLS's picture

(post #53711, reply #1 of 20)

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I've seen potracks in all shapes, sizes and materials. You will have a lot to choose from. Mine is antique heart pine with wrought iron double hooks. It's one of (3) things I actually like in my kitchen. I really think most pot racks are the same, just have different looks. You need to get one that will look right in your kitchen. The one thing I can suggest is that you make sure you get one with lots of hooks. I looked at several that came with 8 hooks - not nearly enough. Then you had to pay for extra hooks seperately. Mine had 16 hooks, and that's plenty for now.

I'll keep a look out for you, if you like, Nihon. I am a huge mail-order catalog shopper. Then when you get to Cleveland and have a better idea of the exact look you want I'll turn over my reasearch to you.

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #2 of 20)

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What a generous offer! Thanks, I really appreciate it! Our new kitchen doesn't have a pantry, so despite the fact that we seem to have lots of cabinets, I'm sure things will be cramped if I don't get the pots and pans out of the way.

Carole's picture

(post #53711, reply #3 of 20)

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Nihon, don't have a pot rack, but a good friend of mine just installed one over her island. First of all, it is too big for their kitchen scale (my husband has been teaching me all about scale and design). Second of all, as she was hanging one of her pots up, it slipped and knocked a huge hole in her island top. I think they are functional, but IMO one has to be careful about the design.

How many weeks until you return?

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #4 of 20)

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I return on December 10th (although I think I get in around 11:30 pm, so by the time I get to the hotel we might as well say I arrive on the 11th), so I have 38 days to go, by last count. Only 23 days at work, though, not counting 3 vacation days and several days for packing and getting our bank account shut down, etc.

My big plan right now is to hang out at the Gateway store in North Olmsted and "try out" their computers for a few days when we arrive, so I still have internet access. Is that sad, or what??

kai_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #5 of 20)

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Nihon, for free internet access, also check your local library. Most branches (at least here) have a few computers hooked to the net.

CLS's picture

(post #53711, reply #6 of 20)

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Nihon, Porter Public Library in Westlake has internet access. Go there. Right across from Gales Nursery, I think. There might be one even closer to you in Avon Lake.

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #7 of 20)

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Hai, gotcha. I think the Avon Lake or Avon library is super-close to our new place, although I don't know for sure whether they have internet access. Of course we'll be signing up for library cards as soon as we have a piece of mail addressed to us at our new house (THERE's one of the stranger rules I've seen) . . . gotta love the "browse" section to find new interests!

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #8 of 20)

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That must have been one big pot! Maybe I'll keep my "pasta pot," which has a solid metal bottom about an inch thick and weighs about 5 pounds even when empty, stored under the counter!

EM_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #9 of 20)

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I'm planning to hang a pot rack too and have this idea I'd like to run by you. Today I went to the antique flea market here and looked at iron grills, like the grillwork seen in doors in France. I haven't found just the right one yet...well, actually, did see one that I loved, but it was too dear pricewise. Anyway, when I find the right one, do you foresee any problems with hanging a piece of iron grillwork from the ceiling on chains, assuming the rafters above are reinforced? I have a 9 foot ceiling with a large island, and want to use something about 3 feet long and 18 inches wide. The decorative grilled panel would hang parallel with the ceiling and could be used as a shelf for whatever and pots would hang from the edges. I've seen nice wrought iron hooks in hardware stores. I'm wondering how snugly the hooks would need to fit so the things don't flip on my head. ;-/ Is this a concern? I've never used a pot rack.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #53711, reply #10 of 20)

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As long as you connect it to the joists you shouldn't have a problem

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #11 of 20)

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> I'm wondering how snugly the hooks would need to fit so the things don't flip on my head

Most pot racks I have seen have S-shaped hooks from which you hang your pots, so they aren't technically "attached" at all. It's nice, since you can move them around when you add new pots to your collection, but it's also annoying because if you don't watch what you're doing, when you remove the pot you also pull the hook down. Since they're lightweight it isn't exactly a safety hazard, it's just annoying, especially if the rack is just barely out of reach for hanging the hooks back up!

Sounds like a beautiful idea to me - most of the commercially available racks I've seen have been pretty ho-hum.

kai_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #12 of 20)

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EM, I've seen that wrought iron grill work treatment used as you describe in, oh, maybe Architectural Digest or some fancy magazine like that. It is stunning. One note, because the texture isn't all that smooth (usually), it can really collect grease and be hard to clean. I'd suggest spraying w/something to decrease porosity. (I have some wrought iron shelf supports to which I didn't do that; they are the pits to keep clean.) What I really like about the hanging rack idea is that it gives you lots of space to hang things on/set things on, and still gives the illusion of not disrupting the space since you can still see the ceiling through it.

You must post a pic when you find what you want and get it installed!

EM_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #13 of 20)

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>One note, because the texture isn't all that smooth (usually), it can really collect grease and be hard to clean. I'd suggest spraying w/something to decrease porosity. (I have some wrought iron shelf supports to which I didn't do
that; they are the pits to keep clean.)

Oh man! Are we supposed to clean things like this? ;-/

Glad you like the idea, and when I get it installed, I'll post a picture if someone will tell me how to do it.

Wolverine's picture

(post #53711, reply #14 of 20)

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Have you looked for that rack at www.homeportfolio.com? If not, they might have it, or at least a link to where it is available.

EM_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #15 of 20)

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Great site! Thanks for posting it. I don't see what I'm looking for but don't expect to see it anywhere except a flea market or salvage yard, etc.

CLS's picture

(post #53711, reply #16 of 20)

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EM, I love your idea! But then, I am a huge wrought iron fan, anyway. I'm going to surprise DH with a custom piece of wrought iron for Christmas - a base for a desk-top we've been working on.

Anway, before I go off on that subject, I love your idea, it will totally work, and all you have to do is hang it from the joists like Mean said. This is simple. You pinpoint the studs with a stud-finder (about $4 in a hardware store if you don't already have one), get some very long eye-screws (round on one end) and some butterfly things (sorry, they have a name but I can't think right when these damned drugs are working! Maybe a phlange or something). Ask your hardware store guy, he'll help you. Now, you mark where the ceiling joists are on the ceiling and decide how you want your rack to hang. Then pre-drill your holes (they will have to be large holes to accomodate the butterfly thing), then twist them onto the end of your screws and insert them. The butterfly thing will spread out when it gets in there and hold your eye-screw very, very securely, enough that you will be able to hang anything you want on your potrack. Then just get some wrought iron chain or chain of your choice (you can alway spray paint it black to match!) an loop through your rack, then hang the chain.

For hooks, ask your hardware store for some large S hooks. IF they don't have them, I would consider finding a local welder or someone who works with wrought iron - they are usually not hard to find - and ask about having him make some wrought iron hooks for you. It should not be expensive at all. I have double hooks - two hooks which are connect at the top with a flat piece - gives me double the hook, literally.

As far as cleaning, buy a spray can of flat polyurethane. Give the thing a few coats, first making sure it has no rust. If it has rust, scrub it free with steel wool, then polyurethane. 2 coats should do it.

Please post a picture when you do this! I love the idea and it will be a very distinctive piece for your kitchen.

EM_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #17 of 20)

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i For hooks, ask your hardware store for some large S hooks.

The hooks are already picked out, but not purchased as of yet. Saw them at 'Restoration Hardware', hand forged wrought iron. They will probably cost more that the pot rack. ;-/

Thanks for the tips. I have a resident handyman who should be able to handle the installation.

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #18 of 20)

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CLS - Not that you were tramping all over town looking for potracks (what with your back and all), but I just looked at the photos we took of the house, and the big fluorescent light in the kitchen is right over the island . . . so unless I can find a potrack made out of neon lighting, I think I'll have to skip it!

FlavourGirl_'s picture

(post #53711, reply #19 of 20)

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If you really want a pot rack but do not have room for a full sized one, maybe a rack that hangs on a wall or on the top of a window frame will work in your new kitchen? Just a thought.

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53711, reply #20 of 20)

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Eve - that was my first thought, too, but I have sort of a weirdly shaped kitchen, and pretty much all of the wallspace is taken up with cabinets. Maybe I can squeeze a bakers' rack into a hallway, and dump some of the less frequently used stuff there. Oh, well - thanks for the suggestion!