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silpats

wisekaren's picture

silpats (post #54256)

So far I have used my silpats for cookies and for cookies, oh, and also for cookies. So, my first question is this: Does anyone use them for anything else? Would you ever use them for something savory, like sticky chicken pieces? (I usually use parchment or Reynolds nonstick foil for things like that.) Second question: Can you use silpats in any cookie recipe, regardless of whether it calls for an ungreased sheet, a greased sheet, a parchment-lined sheet, etc.?

Karen

MadMom's picture

(post #54256, reply #1 of 29)

I just used them last night for the chocolate straws for our dessert.  I think you can use them for just about anything.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

jocelyng's picture

(post #54256, reply #2 of 29)

I used them for baking chicken breasts.

Madeleine's picture

(post #54256, reply #3 of 29)

I just bought a couple of Silpats and was beginning to wonder if I wasted my money.  I baked some cookies with them yesterday, but didn't seem to think it was any better than using parchment.  Maybe I need to get used to them. 


I saw an ad in the Best of Fine Cooking, Fall 2003 that showed cooking eggplant on it and making an Eggplant Parmiggiano.  Perhaps I will try that someday.


Also, I bought my 2 Silpats at 2 different locations.  One has an orange border and the other is white.  One said to store it flat, the other said to roll loosely and store in the original box.  Any thoughts on this from you Silpat devotees out there?


Madeleine
Madeleine
MadMom's picture

(post #54256, reply #4 of 29)

I roll mine loosely.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Jean's picture

(post #54256, reply #5 of 29)

I roll mine loosely too, but you could store it in the sheet pan that it fits into. I find I'm using mine more for rolling out cookie and pie dough and kneading bread than baking. I love using parchment for cookies. I slide the whole parchment onto a rack for cooling. A quick rinse to cool the cookies sheet for the next batch, slap on another parchment and ready to go again. No frogging around with a spatula.

I used to eat a lot of natural foods until I learned that most people die from natural causes.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #6 of 29)

a silpat is extremely helpful if you want to do any hot sugar work. I don't do it for anybody but myself, (i'm not a pro) but is sure is a lot of fun and you can make some really pretty doodads for desserts. pulled sugar is also fun. it helps to be able to tolerate heat- but I used to do glass blowing, so i'm not afraid of it.

this is not a must have tool. ( i thought it was when i bought it, but i don't use it that often)

One thing in silicone that I do love is the silicone cake pans, and mini cake pans that are really flexible. They are very easy to get the cakes out of and are really cool.

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/tabletools/102006.html

don't knwo the brand, but that's a photo

BarbaraK's picture

(post #54256, reply #7 of 29)

I don't have a silpat, but have debated getting one over the years. The thing that may have just tipped the balance is the idea of rolling pastry on it. Does it work well for that? I always end up scraping miserably with a spatula at pie dough on my floured counter top, and ending up with most unusual patchwork shapes for my pies. It tastes good, but does not look at all impressive!

MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #8 of 29)

for pastry, why dont you use a pastry cloth?

I think that silpats are great for sticky doughs- You can sandwhich the dough between two of them and then peel off the top when you are ready to bake.

I haven't tried regular pie dough on the slipat, but I use pastry cloths- they hold in the flour so the dough doesn' t absorb it all.

BarbaraK's picture

(post #54256, reply #9 of 29)

I use a tea towel, with flour rubbed in, to put on top of the dough, but the bottom of the dough has always sat on the floured countertop. Do you use a pastry cloth for the bottom and top?

MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #10 of 29)

oh how funny! I have never heard of putting the cloth on top of the dough. We always put the dough on the cloth. The major benefit is that you can easily pick up the dough and turn it around or lift it off the cloth. To transfer it to the pie tin, you pick up one side of the cloth and fold the pastry on itself in half, top to bottom, pull back the cloth, and then repeat left to right. Then the pastry is much smaller and more sturdy to pick up with two hands to transfer to teh pie dish, where you can open up the dough. Very easy

As I am typing this, I am reminded that I also use a pastry sock for the rolling pin. This acts as a top cloth too, so I guess I was using a pastry cloth on the top!

edited to add:

My mother keeps her cloth in the freezer in a ziplock bag. She rarely washes it and just adds more flour as needed. Cool trick, pun intended. :)


Edited 2/23/2004 3:49:31 PM ET by Mer

BarbaraK's picture

(post #54256, reply #11 of 29)

Ah, the pastry sock! Yes, I have always put the tea towel on top, to keep the pastry from getting tough. So, moral of the story: from now on, out will come two tea towels!!

I like this forum -- you learn so much!

Thanks also for your mother's tip. I will try that. Cool, indeed!

Fledge's picture

(post #54256, reply #12 of 29)

I was curious, and baked buffalo wings using Silpat, it worked well.  The clean up was easy.


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #13 of 29)

now that's a good idea!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #54256, reply #14 of 29)

baked buffalo wings using Silpat


Well, there's a good idea!  The cleanup from those is always such a pain!  I"ll have to try that next time.


For some reason, I had it in my head to only use my Silpats for baking, and since I don't do too much of that, they've stayed in the cupboard. 


This thread has inspired me to get them out and try them for other uses, too.


Thanks!


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Fledge's picture

(post #54256, reply #15 of 29)

Yeah, and just when they took my favorite Shake and Bake Buffalo Wings off my grocery shelf.


You know you're addicted when you go out of town and look for that item.


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

TracyK's picture

(post #54256, reply #16 of 29)

I used mine for cooking bacon once and the poor thing is still so greasy and bacon-smelling I'd be afraid to use it for anything else... and I've washed it with liquid dish soap at least four times!


Ps: I always line my buffalo wing pan with heavy-duty foil and that seems to work just fine. :-)



"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #17 of 29)

ewww.... have you tried vinegar and baking soda? Or boiling water?

TracyK's picture

(post #54256, reply #18 of 29)

Might try the vinegar and baking soda... boiling water and scrubbing with a plastic dish scrubber and dish detergent didn't do a darn thing, though. Very annoying... I will never do that again!!


"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

assibams's picture

(post #54256, reply #19 of 29)

Do the baking soda first, then try a vinegar wash. If you mix baking soda with anything acidic you're neutralizing it.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Aberwacky's picture

(post #54256, reply #20 of 29)

Yes, but mixing baking soda and vinegar together is very dramatic!


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #21 of 29)

let us know how it works out- i use baking soda and vinegar on my zip lock containers when they feel greasy after washing. works everytime. Sometime i let the baking soda sit for a while after scrubbing before i pour on the vinegar.

UncleDunc's picture

(post #54256, reply #22 of 29)

I've found washing soda to be very effective in cutting grease, both in the kitchen and in the laundry.

MER02's picture

(post #54256, reply #23 of 29)

where do you buy washing soda?

UncleDunc's picture

(post #54256, reply #26 of 29)

In stores around here it's close to the laundry detergent. At my regular store they have little boxes like baking soda and bigger boxes - like one or two pounds.

Adele's picture

(post #54256, reply #24 of 29)

Is that what Borax is?

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

assibams's picture

(post #54256, reply #25 of 29)

Borax is Sodium Borate, Sodium Bicarbonate is Baking Soda, and Sodium Carbonate is Washing Soda.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Doris1149's picture

(post #54256, reply #27 of 29)

Rub it with cornstarch-read this here or someplace else recently. The person said it got rid of that greasy feeling.


DJ-

DJ-

Gretchen's picture

(post #54256, reply #28 of 29)

I used mine for cooking bacon once and the poor thing is still so greasy and bacon-smelling I'd be afraid to use it for anything else... and I've washed it with liquid dish soap at least four times


Over on Gail's someone talked about their silpat getting all sticky and greasy after a lot of use. Somewhat serendipitously she used it with some cornstarch (I THINK) and it all came clean. 


Just got to the end of the thread--so maybe it is cornstarch. I posted it a while back.


Gretchen


Edited 2/25/2004 8:15:56 AM ET by GRETCHEN50

Gretchen
dixie1's picture

(post #54256, reply #29 of 29)

Actually, my silpats came to me feeling 'a little greasy", sticky from day one. I don't think you can get all this off of them.