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Ok MC, here's one for you..

Adele_'s picture

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Reading 'Bone in the Throat' by Anthony Bourdain (the guy who is letting us know all the dirty rest. secrets) and he writes: "He filled a stainless steel crock with hot water and dropped a handful of male and female spoons..." What the heck are male/female spoons? Slotted/non-slotted? Wide/skinny? Big/small???

He also mentioned dried 'cepes' w/an accent mark over the first 'e', a type of mushroom. Not in Pattersons Vegetables, or any of my other books.

BTW, the book is a quick read, interesting rest. info. Murder, drugs, Mob. Not the best, but I enjoy food novels.

kai_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #1 of 10)

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Adele, a cèpe is an edible mushroom, as opposed to a champignon--a mushroom which may or may not be edible. Interestingly (or not), I see far more packages of chi-chi mushroom mixes labeled champignon something or other rather than cèpe something or other. The only time I've seen cèpe on something was on criminis (which, IIRC, are baby portobellos). BTW, there is a really good frozen "champignon" alternative-to-meat burger I think I found at Trader Joes.

Will someone please correct me where I'm wrong? TIA

Adele_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #2 of 10)

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Thanks Kai! Only I think the criminis are NOT baby porto's! Hit search & you will see the discussion on this! What does IIRC mean?

kai_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #3 of 10)

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LOL apparently I dont RC (IIRC=If I Recall Correctly). Thanks, I'll search :)

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #53777, reply #4 of 10)

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I consulted the Oxford Companion to Food. It doesn't have an entry for champignon, though I can tell you that it's the German name for button mushrooms (as well as being French for mushroom). It has an incredibly lengthy entry for cepe (or cep).

Briefly, cepes are a type of boletus mushroom. There are 4 of them:

Boletus edulis (aka cepe de Bordeaux in french, Steinpilz in German, or Porcini in Italian)

Boletus aestivalis (aka cepe d'ete)

Boletus aereus (aka cepe bronze)

Boletus pinicola (aka cepe acajou)

Adele_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #5 of 10)

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Wow! Thanks. See the things I learn here!

kai_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #6 of 10)

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Good work, CM, thanks! Sounds like a good book to have.

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #7 of 10)

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Au contraire I do think criminis are small portobellos--or as I read somewhere, portobellos are criminis on steroids.

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #53777, reply #8 of 10)

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Uh oh, here we go again :-)

(Gretchen, somewhere in the archives you'll find a lengthy and heated discussion of this very topic, I don't actually remember the final verdict though)

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #53777, reply #9 of 10)

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I think "champignon" is just French for mushroom--used on all the French menus. "Cepe" with the accent is used for a wild mushroom,a porcini, as CM said. And I still stand by the crimini thing--I read it all at that time too.

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #53777, reply #10 of 10)

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According to Epicurious you're right.

cremino

[kray-MEE-noh, kray-MEE-nee]
A dark-brown, slightly firmer variation of the everyday cultivated white mushroom. Cremini mushrooms have a slightly fuller flavor than their paler relatives. They have a smooth, rounded cap that ranges in size from 1/2 to 2 inches in diameter. The PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM is simply the fully matured form of this mushroom.