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marble pastry board

dlish's picture

Does anyone here have a marble board? Is it worth it? Any difference in types of marble? I'd mostly be rolling out pastry dough, occasionally doing chocolate work.

Thanks in advance for any advice/suggestions!

Bix's picture

(post #54931, reply #1 of 23)

I got a great deal on some marble at a monument (grave stone) makers store.

knitpik's picture

(post #54931, reply #13 of 23)

Thanks for the tip. I can just picture my DH's face when I tell him I want to contact a grave stone maker. LOL


Edited 12/1/2005 3:29 pm ET by knitpik

tcurda's picture

(post #54931, reply #14 of 23)

I need to look into that also. I'd love a piece 2" thick and about 24x36", maybe a little larger. I just need to find a place to store it... ;-)

Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.


Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.
knitpik's picture

(post #54931, reply #16 of 23)

You need to dedicate a place for that on your countertop, otherwise it would be a real PITA to move this baby around. We're having extra countertop made and I hope I can make room for some marble. We'll see.

BoofyQ's picture

(post #54931, reply #2 of 23)

I got a smallish one with a marble rolling pin as a gift years ago - useless. It's only 14" x 18" or so - too small to be useful for anything IMHO.

I think if you had a larger one - especially if you could leave it out on the counter all the time, it might be good. You can always cool it down with ice packs before use.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #54931, reply #3 of 23)

I don't think it matters much for pastry work, but it does make working with chocolate a lot easier, even the little ones.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #54931, reply #4 of 23)

I love my marble board. I can't swear it makes for better pastry, but I like the feel of it, and the cooler surface is definitely a plus. I also love it for kneading bread doughs by hand. Probably not necessary, but it's a lovely luxury to have. (Though as someone else has already pointed out, the smaller boards are less than useless.)

dlish's picture

(post #54931, reply #5 of 23)

What would you consider small? The one I'm looking at is 18x18

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #54931, reply #6 of 23)

I don't know the dimensions of mine off-hand, but I'll measure it tonight.

dlish's picture

(post #54931, reply #7 of 23)

Thanks, 'Shy'! My kitchen is kind of small, therefore it gets hot when the oven is on. I think a marble board would be nice for keeping the pastry somewhat cool.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #54931, reply #8 of 23)

As a pastry chef I have tried all of that crap.  A regular wooden pin and board works just as well.  Forget the gimmicks

ashleyd's picture

(post #54931, reply #9 of 23)

And for the non-pastry chefs, if you believe a marble pastry board helps ignore the man behind the curtain.


We don't all have the technique.



Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #54931, reply #10 of 23)

I guess if it works for you, fine.

ashleyd's picture

(post #54931, reply #11 of 23)

Yeah but I'm only making British rubbish.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Hobartgirl's picture

(post #54931, reply #12 of 23)

I agree with you.  I would not give mine up for anything.


I have a marble table top that is approximately 36 inches by 52 inches that I bought at a thrift shop years ago.  Of course it stays right on the counter!


 


Home of the best new or vintage kitchen equipment.
Home of the best new or vintage kitchen equipment.
favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #54931, reply #15 of 23)

It's certainly not essential, but I do like mine.  I bought mine more than 20 years ago.  As Julia Child suggested, I had it cut to fit the shelf in my refrigerator, 17" x 23".  What was I thinking?  That sucker is heavy, and I certainly never moved it in and out of the refrigerator.  If I want to chill it, I put ice cubes in a Ziploc bag and let it sit on top of the slab.  I keep it at one end of my wooden work table.  It's resting on a small terrycloth towel, so it's easy to slide over to the center of the table. 

PeterDurand's picture

(post #54931, reply #17 of 23)

I have this Rube Goldburg design in my mind: Make a slab of concrete with refrig tubes imbedded, connected to your fridge compressor and place your marble on it. Voila, a very cold marble to be used anytime without fuss or muss. Of course you would have to route the line to the fridge overhead to avoid tripping over it, but so what? Problem solved with a few tacks in the ceiling attached to some springs, attached to the line. A fashion statement.

I think I need a glass of wine..

 

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #54931, reply #19 of 23)

Problem solved with a few tacks in the ceiling attached to some springs, attached to the line. A fashion statement.


Keep working on it.  Seriously, there must be a way, and I'm sure it would sell.  Actually, the marble slab is a few degrees cooler than my wood surface, and I seem to have more control of my pastry as I'm rolling it out.  Even though I've had this marble for about 20 years, it's been used elsewhere in the house.  It found its way back to the kitchen just a few months ago and it's there to stay.

Megh's picture

(post #54931, reply #18 of 23)

I've got a 16"x22" Verde Antique (deep green) marble board which lives to the left of the stove.  It's plenty big enough to do pastry (I don't do chocolate, since I wouldn't need the marble as a spoon would be sufficient).  Have never tried lifting it into the fridge; as others have said a bag of frozen stuff on top works.  Frozen chicken, frozen pork roast, etc. 


I don't think a specific marble is better than another, as what is prized is the solid, polished stone surface - I think.  I have the green marble simply because it's quarried directly behind our property and we have 4"x 12" tiles of it rimming the countertops.  If you have a choice, select what compliments your decor; it's not going to be moved about too much, I'd guess.

nbailey's picture

Marble Pastry Board (post #54931, reply #20 of 23)

I have a 38cm x 38 cm marble pastry board which I recently board at a craft fair from Made From Marble.  They do have a website http://www.madefrommarble.com/products.php?product=6

Cost £35 but well worth the money - its beautifully hand crafted and I am convinced my pastry is better since using this board - it just keeps it so beautifully cool.  I can't recommend enough!

Gretchen9's picture

This thread is 6 years old. (post #54931, reply #21 of 23)

This thread is 6 years old. You can buy a piece of granite at Lowe's for very little.

sscookwaresets's picture

Yes, it is. RSVP marble board (post #54931, reply #22 of 23)

Yes, it is. RSVP marble board is the best one. I'm using this marble board for the past one year and I'm very happy with it.

Ricks503's picture

marble vs other stone (post #54931, reply #23 of 23)

Is there any differance between marble and other stones (granite, quartz...)

I was thinking of buying a piece from a counter top installer who has some pieces from sink cutouts.  Just like with the countertops, one side is polished smooth and I think would make an excellent pastry rolling stone.

 

 

Any thoughts on this and if there is any difference between the various surfaces?

 

 

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