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Frankie's picture

Mandolines (post #55379)

We all have knives. Many/ Most of us have one or more food processors of various sizes, but who/ how many of us has a mandoline?

When do you use it? When cooking for more than 4? When doing production? Special effects?

Which model do you have or have you used and liked?

Frankie


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MadMom's picture

(post #55379, reply #1 of 32)

I have a mandoline and hardly ever use it.  I might use it more now that Jean sent me the holder thingy to keep from getting my fingers bloody.  Mine is a stainless French one I've had for years.  I used to use it a lot, but don't think of it that often.



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CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #55379, reply #2 of 32)

I still like my fingers, so I haven't braved buying a new one, had a cheapo from infomercial in the '80's used it for french fries a few times then one day saw that the blade had rusted and threw it away.

I suppose if I got serious I would want to get a professional to teach me how to safely use it.

I'd probably go for the OXO based on price and safety, until I perfected the techniques then maybe get a more expensive model. My BIL spent $180 on one and used it twice in 10 years!!

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TracyK's picture

(post #55379, reply #3 of 32)

I have a $10 plastic version that I picked up at an Asian market about 5-6 years ago. I use it almost exclusively for slicing apples for salads, and potatoes for home fries or gratins.

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Adele's picture

(post #55379, reply #6 of 32)

Ditto, I have a cheapo Asian store one.  Used it maybe 3 times.  I had another more complicated (parts) one that was given to me, but cut the hell out of myself the first time using it.  I think 4 people had that same mandoline before it got yard saled.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Glenys's picture

(post #55379, reply #21 of 32)

Ditto, I pick up one every six months and give away the last second last one, and for the recipient, they're usually glad to have it. Last time I actually found it at TJMaxx in a case for $15 CDN. It's all I use for potatoes, apples, cucumbers for Thai salads or the finest chiffonade of cabbage for certain slaws. Unless I'm doing gaufrettes, the French mandoline never sees the light of day.

pamilyn's picture

(post #55379, reply #22 of 32)

ditto here.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Cissytoo's picture

(post #55379, reply #24 of 32)

I have a $10 plastic version


I have the same kind -- got it at a CorningWare outlet in Lee, MA.  It works great for cukes, zucchini, onions and potatoes.  It has a couple of julienne blades but I never use them.  I've given about six of them as gifts.

Biscuit's picture

(post #55379, reply #4 of 32)

Have one, use it a lot, especially for potatoes and any other vegetable gratin or tempura vegetables.  I also use it to make julienne because it is more consistant than my knife skills at julienne.


Also love it for very thin slices of fruits, especially citrus, and I even use it for thin slices of very firm bread like bagels for bagel chips.


Of course, I got hooked on it's versatility in culinary school, and then used it all the time when I worked in a pro kitchen, so maybe I'm just used to it.


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ArtPollard's picture

(post #55379, reply #5 of 32)

I have the one that Williams Sonoma sells. They used to sell the Bosh one but recently started selling one that is made in France.  (Sorry, I don't remember the name off hand).  As far as I am aware, they are the exclusive dealer in the US.  The quality is impecible and it even comes with a training DVD.  Ok, the DVD didn't cover tons but really, they aren't that hard to use either.


This was best one that I've been able to find.  Many people seem to like but only so far.  The Bosh one for example, apparently had problems holding an edge. At least that was the most common complaint that I found on various reviews.  Anyway, if anyone is looking for a good mandoline, I would recommend checking out the one that Williams Sonoma carries. It is a nice piece of workmanship and even comes in its own plastic briefcase like holder so that the pieces don't get lost.


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SallyBR1's picture

(post #55379, reply #7 of 32)

I normally don t like to confess my sins - but yes, I do have a mandoline. ANd yes, I use it for potatoes only. YOu know, the gratin with half a ton of cream.

Basically, considering the use I get from it, it is by far the most expensive gadget I own.

(le sigh)

Well, there is another one - the stove top smoker. Not as expensive as the mandoline, but I use it even less

(Sally needs help)

 


 


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AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #55379, reply #8 of 32)

I have the Oxo mandoline (purchased for me as a gift), and I use it when I have to slice up more than 2 of something large - cukes, zukes, potatoes. For carrots, it's easier to use a knife, as I usually don't care about even pieces for carrots.

I also use it when I want a fancy cut for french fries or waffle chips, but that is not often.

I'd say I use it about once a month.

I use the food processor less than that.

Most often, I use my chef's knife or a box grater. I use the knife daily and the box grater weekly.

 


Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

dorcast's picture

(post #55379, reply #9 of 32)

I have an Oxo as well, it seems safer than many of the models that terrify me.
I also seem to only use it for Gratin - Contessa's fennel and potato.
So fattening, you can't make it often, so my mandoline does not get much use.
So delicious, it justifies the price of the mandoline.

Ricks503's picture

(post #55379, reply #10 of 32)

I will be getting one for xmas, just cause!


From my readings, the Bron is the best with the OXO being a good second.


 


 


" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

dixie's picture

(post #55379, reply #29 of 32)

the Bron is the best with the OXO being a good second


I have both and always reach for the OXO just because the Bron is so scary. Really thin citrus needs the Bron though.

mangiaFagioli's picture

(post #55379, reply #11 of 32)

I have a mandoline, but use my Benriner all the time instead, though I guess that's a mandoline too. So much easier in every way. Blades do need replacing though.

Most frequently use it for green papaya type salads, also for potatoes.

Lee's picture

(post #55379, reply #12 of 32)

I've used the Bron for years.  It can't be beat for potato or other veggie gratins, for the occasional gaufrette potatoes, and for julienne.  The little julienne gizmo that Pam recommended is also fabulous for small amounts, especially carrots.   

samchang's picture

(post #55379, reply #13 of 32)

I use one occasionally when there's a lot of shredding to do, but not enough tat would justify hauling out the FP. I've had the Bron but gave it away--too clunky and space hoggish, and now I use a Benriner.

beebuzzled's picture

(post #55379, reply #14 of 32)

I have had my Borner V-slicer for years and am very happy with it. It gets used whenever I have a lot of slicing to do.

Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow

Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Jean's picture

(post #55379, reply #15 of 32)

 This is the one I have. I sent the guide thingie to Sharon because it gets in my way. I have a plastic thing from another slice that I use to protect my fingers and it works great. I use it mostly for even potato and zucchini slices. It's a little unwieldy to set and a clunker to store, but I'm glad I bought it.



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Ballottine's picture

(post #55379, reply #16 of 32)

I used my Asian slicer so much it cracked, so I bought one made in France for $$$, it was so clunky I used it rarely and without  "joy."  Finally, I got OXO and I use it all the time.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

courgette's picture

(post #55379, reply #18 of 32)

I had an OXO and I didn't like it. It seemed dull. I took it back and got a Benriner-the wide one. I like it. I also like the peeler-I use it a lot for salads.


Mo

Ballottine's picture

(post #55379, reply #19 of 32)

Oh, Courgette, Courgette, COURGETTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Did you have to do it to me?  I bought my Benriner years ago for $12.99 in a China Town dumpy little place in DC.  We used it a lot and eventually the plastic frame cracked. I went to look for a replacement and it was $35, so I bought a metal one made in France and hated it, I've had my OXO  since this summer and it works well for me.  I was all set for life.


After reading  your post I went to Benriner site to see how much my old friend costs now and I saw  the cook's helper and then I saw the other helper and the other helper and I remembered how much I love the zucchini pasta and the daikon threads and  carrot andgel hair and ... now I have to get one, but which one???????


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

courgette's picture

(post #55379, reply #20 of 32)

Sorry......I just got the basic model in the wide width. It has a couple of blades you can change.


Mo

dlish's picture

(post #55379, reply #17 of 32)

I, too, have the Williams Sonoma one that comes with a video. I use mine regularly for making nice, even slices and for julienning. I like it because it makes all the slices nice and uniform. I'm not that proficient with my knife. Also, since I have it, I might as well use it, right?! It makes a very quick job of slicing things up. But, be careful, it's easy to cut yourself -- and it HUUURTS!!

thedessertlady's picture

(post #55379, reply #23 of 32)

I love my cheap one that I'm going to finally replace for a another cheap one. I use it for thinly slicing onions (quickly) less crying and for slicing potatoes for things like scallop potatoes and or course cold slaw, it the season. I love it when I need it.

RuthWells's picture

(post #55379, reply #25 of 32)

We have the Oxo mandoline and it's a great tool for waffle chips or large amounts of slicing or juliening.

Ruth Wells


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Ruth Wells

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cookie1's picture

(post #55379, reply #26 of 32)

I also have the Oxo and use it often for onions, cukes, eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash, and potatoes.

Cheryl


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Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Heather's picture

(post #55379, reply #27 of 32)

I'm thinking about getting a Benriner. Amazon has a Super Benriner @ $45 and a Benriner Large @ $59.95 that look the same. Both say they have 4 blades and are 5" wide. Does anyone know if they are the same or different? The cheaper one comes from Dean and Deluca which seems odd--I never think of them as having bargains.

hsnow73's picture

(post #55379, reply #28 of 32)

I've used my Benriner quite a lot for the past 5 years and thought it was great.  However, two weeks ago, I purchased the Swissmar Borner V-Slicer Plus on the Amazon Friday sale for $19.99.  Comparing the two, I feel that the V-slicer works better.  And if I had to purchased another Benriner, I would want to buy the one with the container underneath.

Glenys's picture

(post #55379, reply #30 of 32)

I'm not a fan of V-slicers so I'd opt for anything without the V. I recently tried the OXO and it's really a great unit without the complications of the traditional French.
The reason I don't like the V is I simply prefer a blade that cuts like a knife blade, and I find I can adjust the straight blade slicers to exactly where I want just by looking at them. I can never get the V as fine as the straight blade.