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looking for chinnese claypot cooker

sudo's picture

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I have searched the web and stores for a chinnese claypot. It has a lid with a small vent hole in it. If anyone can help me I would really appreciate it. tyia sudo

Choo_d'Phet's picture

(post #53610, reply #1 of 9)

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Is this what you're looking for?

It's available here

sudo's picture

(post #53610, reply #2 of 9)

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Thanks for trying Choo but that is a steam pot. which keeps the steam in side. Im looking for a clay pot with a lid that has a small vent hole in the lid itself. Its called a chinnese claypot cooker. But thankyou anyway thats a nice pot. sudo

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53610, reply #3 of 9)

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Sudo, try and ask one of the New Yorkers to go to Mott Street (in Chinatown, Manhattan) and get you one; or alternatively, on 8th Avenue in Brooklyn (Chinatown East) there are many supermarkets that sell these. If I still lived there, I'd do it for you.

You're talking about the stoneware/clay pot that sometimes has wires wrapped around it? It has a lid?

sudo's picture

(post #53610, reply #4 of 9)

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Thankyou chiff. Thats so nice of you. I dont know about any wires but yes stoneware/clay pot,with lid. the important thing is the lid have the small vent hole. I have a girlfreind looking in the san diago area now for me. Used to have familey in new york city, but dont anymore.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53610, reply #5 of 9)

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I still have a ton of family in NY. E-mail me if you have no luck finding the pot with your friend in SD.

nihon_no_cook's picture

(post #53610, reply #6 of 9)

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Sudo - I know exactly what you're looking for, and I have one sitting on a shelf in my basement. The Japanese term for it is a "nabe" pot, named for the type of stew that is made in it. I bought one with the insane idea that I could use it as a casserole dish, but have had second thoughts about that when I read something about having to soak the thing for three days in a salt water mixture before using it . . . not sure if that's true or not, but I don't want the sucker to shatter and leave me with an oven full of pottery shards and goop to clean up.

Mine's grey with cream designs over it, about 10" across and 4" deep (that's roughly, you understand), and is never going to be used. Email me if you want it - I'll even spring for postage. Don't use the email address that comes up if you click on my handle here - try avonhokie@yahoo.com instead.

Hope this helps.

sudo's picture

(post #53610, reply #7 of 9)

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Nihon- Thankyou for your sweet offer that was very generous of you. I did find what I was looking for at a antique store the other day. We have a million of them in this area, and they carry used and sometimes new items.But thankyou so much for your offer. There are a lot of really nice people on this board, Im happy to have found it.I only hope that I to can help someone out when the time comes. sudo

kai_'s picture

(post #53610, reply #8 of 9)

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And you are one of those nice people, Sudo :) looking through 20 cookbooks for mention of korma powder, e.g. :)

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #53610, reply #9 of 9)

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Sudo, I am curious about your use for the claypot with a hole. I have only put off buying a claypot (they are so cheap), because I am tight on cubbord space, but my interest was heightened by a couple of good recipes I found in the paper. I tried one, using my wok, and it was great. I stopped by the Wok Shop to check them out and found these clay sand pots:

http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/PRODUCTS/product_folder/crockery_chinaware/c...

They do not have holes in the tops, though. I found some with holes in the top, with a hand-lettered sign sying "Dun Chong" steaming Jars for herbs, meats etc. They were $20.

I know you already have what you need (though I can't figure what one was doing in an antique shop!). Good thing--they are heavy and you would have to pay a lot for shipping, but here is a handsome steaming pot, FYI:

http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/PRODUCTS/product_folder/crockery_chinaware/c...