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Knife Sharpening...

Chiffonade_'s picture

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I have a Chantry knife sharpener which I love and believe it works well. We finish an edge with the steel after using the Chantry. S.O. has a water stone which we use occasionally.

My question boils down to: Has anyone ever seen the "diamond" knife sharpeners out there? They look like a regular steel with a handle and a long spike that can be round or oval shaped. Does anyone believe these "diamond" steels are any better than a regular steel?

S.O. says that the only real drawback of a diamond steel is that it wears away the blade faster than conventional methods. (He's a sharpening fool, wields a steel like a butcher.)

What are your favorite methods for keeping those knives in tip top shape?

Jean_'s picture

(post #53584, reply #31 of 43)

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Your article talks about the
b grind
and
b bevel
of the blade. Figure 1 illustrates a grind that is not beveled. Figures 2 and 3 illustrate grinds that are beveled. If you can't understand that--I give up.

Carolina's picture

(post #53584, reply #32 of 43)

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Not sure there's any reason to be so snide, dearest. Thanks for the site. It gives verification to everything we have said all along. Figure #1 is a knife balde
i without
bevel. Figure #3 is a knife blade
i with
a bevel.

Nancy_G.'s picture

(post #53584, reply #33 of 43)

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Gosh MC what a site!

Seeing the title KnifeArt reminded me of the best sharpening my knives ever had. Our newspaper had done an article on knife sharpening and listed a few places to have them done. I selected one and as I drove there I realized I was is in a fairy seedy part of town. I pulled up to a shack with scrubby, half dead bushes around it and almost drove away but I really wanted my knives sharpened without having to leave them for a few days. This place turned out to be a martial arts store and the teeny front room was full of enormous knives, chains and other assorted items that I couldn't begin to identify. An equally suspect person came bursting through a door in the back pushing away a screen of those beads people hung in their doorways in the 60s. I gave him my knives and he did a fantastic job but I feared for my life the entire time and was happy to drive away. Now I'm sad that that store isn't in business because I would go back in a second to have my knives done that way again.

But I digress...the real reason I signed in was to say that the latest issue of Cuisine has a four page article on knife sharpening. It includes photographs on how to sharpen knives and close up drawings showing what the knife edge looks like in various stages of use. Also, it gives a tip on knowing the correct angle to hold the knife to the steel - the width of a packet of matches.

Wolverine's picture

(post #53584, reply #34 of 43)

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Then give up, the article you posted pertains to the cutting edge applied to the bevel, not the bevel.( see illustrations of your post ). Carolina - if the globals did not have a bevel, I am not sure how the sharpener put one on them. Mine grinds the bottom edge of the knife, beveled or not. Not sure which / waht you have. My electric sharpener has a series of three diamond grinding wheels - they vary in coarseness / fineness for finishing off the blade, they also let you determine the amount of sharpening you need. Since you have already applied the sharpener to the knives, try running them thru again, very slowly. If that doesn't work, take them to a shop and have them done. Did the mfg say to sharpener only with a stone or steel?

Wolverine's picture

(post #53584, reply #35 of 43)

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Carolina -

I forgot to say that I didn't know which Chef's Choice sharpener you had when I posted my earlier reply to Mean Chef's knife art page. Mine is a chef's choice with three different grinds available, I know there are others - which type do you have? ( blame all this confusion on lack of coffee!!)

Carolina's picture

(post #53584, reply #36 of 43)

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I have the Chef's Choice 110 with three slots. The blurb in the PCD catalog reads: "100% diamond abrasives create a Tri-beveled edge..."

The ad below that one shows the Chef's Choice 120 which also has three slots, but is said to be "for truly commerical power.....with 100% fine diamond-coated conical disks". It also creates 3 bevels. Wonder what the difference is in the two models, besides the fact that the 120 cost $40 more.

Oh, well, I going to give all my knives a run through using the technique you discribed and hope for the best. BTW, Global recommends using a Japanese whetstone "in order to maintain the edge", but as for actual sharpening, the ad doesn't say. (I learned about the whetstone recommendation long after I had been using the CC electric.)

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #53584, reply #37 of 43)

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The literature that comes with the Global knives says DO NOT use an electric sharpener. It also shows how to sharpen the knives with a whetstone and how to use the ceramic or diamond steel.

Carolina's picture

(post #53584, reply #38 of 43)

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HELLO!! Tune in world! I've already said that at least 3 times!

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #53584, reply #39 of 43)

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Why keep repeating yourself. I only said it once.

Wolverine's picture

(post #53584, reply #40 of 43)

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Let me know how it goes. Sounds like the best thing since you had already used the sharpener. BTW that is the same model that I have - I find it works very well, sometimes if I have been particularly lazy, I have to run it through the full sequence twice.

noChefAtAll's picture

(post #53584, reply #41 of 43)

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i've been told that the global knives are actually a sandwich of 5 or so steel layers. a lot of the modern less expensive japanese knives are made that way. the implication is that the grinding of wheels and the attempt to 'bevel' actually tends to seperate the layers of that sandwich. perhaps different layers heat at different rates. pseudo science, i know.

but then, knife sharpening seems to be in the realm of pseudo science too. i have never, not even from the much lauded MC, read of a good approach to sharpening knives at home on a regular basis. looking through that cutlery catalog (if forget which one, major) and they talk about all the different hardnesses of the steels, some hold an edge longer but don't sharpen well, others you have to sharpen (or hone?) every day because the steel is soft but they are incredibly sharp (some french knives - we all seem to use the 'german' style/tradition knives)...

i do use a japanese waterstone, it's a bit of work but the knives become a pleasure to use and you don't have that high pitched scratching of diamond on steel. but then do i hone with a steel or porcelain steel, it's endless....

oh, BTW, i have an animation (flash 4.0) at 206.20.100.99/demo22.swf - it's a little large (530k), and possibly wacko, but if you have nothing else to do..

sorry about this very long post.

Lana_Potter's picture

(post #53584, reply #42 of 43)

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If it is permissible to use an electric knife sharpener, which one do you suggest? Also, as a "beginner", do you have any suggestion on which name-brand cutlery to purchase? I enjoy listening and learning. Thank you.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53584, reply #43 of 43)

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If you haven't guessed from our gushing about it, we love Global knives. The Wusthof or Henkels still have their places, but the Global is extremely sharp and excellent for slicing.

Check out http://www.cutlery.com which is Professional Cutlery Direct's website. And feel free to ask any other questions :) We aim to please.