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Kitchen design questions

Beebs's picture

I think I've found a house to buy, and am planning the kitchen already, even though we haven't made an offer (and it probably won't be accepted). Anyway, I was wondering about 2 things.

First, does anybody have experience with a cork floor in the kitchen? It seems like such a wonderful idea, but I'm wondering if it would get wrecked from dropping things, which I do all the time (things like my marble rolling pin, for instance)

Second, I've always had my cooktop against a wall, but I'm thinking about removing the walls in this new kitchen to have a real open floor plan, but that would mean the cooktop would have to be free-standing. Does anyone have experience with a free standing cooktop? Do downdrafts really work, and doesn't the grease fly all over the floor behind the cooktop? Somehow it seems like a really bad idea, but I'm interested in hearing what people have to say.

Sandy

jrobin's picture

(post #54723, reply #1 of 25)

I personally like cork,  we have it in our master bath(set on the diagonal) it looks so awsome!  At the time we were remodeling I didn't have the confidence to use it in our kitchen, and went with large tiles on the diagonal. When I worked with a design team a few years ago we were working with a family that had a 50 year old cork floor in the kitchen and insisted on keeping it because they loved it so.  I also remember reading about a church somewhere that had a 100 year old cork floor.


Also, I think the position of the sink/prep/cleanup area is more important, because even though we are all serious cooks who come to these foodie chat rooms, you really don't spend much time at the stove. My cooktop is at my wall and my sink/dishwasher/trash are on my huge island and I now face everyone almost all the time.


BTW my area on the wall around the cooktop is a real focal point in the kitchen to look at from the whole living/dining area.


 


 


 


 


 


 

Beebs's picture

(post #54723, reply #3 of 25)

I'd love to see a picture of the cork floor in your bathroom, and also of your huge island. I was actually thinking about having the sink in the island, but it seemed a little weird, so it's nice to know it works for you. Exactly how big is your island?

Sandy

jrobin's picture

(post #54723, reply #11 of 25)

Have been away a few days and just saw your post.


I don't have a digital camera at the moment, and if I can figure out how to post pics, I will do it.  Sorry, I am not good at the computer stuff. I will try to get my neighbor to help me later.


Jennifer

Geoffchef's picture

(post #54723, reply #2 of 25)

I would want at least a foot of countertop behind the cooktop just to keep kids a safe distance away. Grease isn't going to spatter any farther than it does  now - is it on the floor much in front of the cooktop?
Mixed reports on downdraft vents, but most are negative. You can get some really nice hoods that will hang over an island, but you need a route to outside to vent them. Is the house a bungalow or a 2 storey? If it's a bungalow it's easy - straight up!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Beebs's picture

(post #54723, reply #4 of 25)

You know, after I wrote that about the grease splattering in back of the cooktop, I realized how stupid it was because of course the grease probably splatters on the floor in front of the cooktop, and I basically don't notice it.

Anyway, I really don't like the idea of a hood hanging over the island - I'm afraid it will look more like a restaurant than a cozy home. (And it is a 2 story house) I think I've pretty much decided to keep the cooktop on a wall.

Sandy

PeterDurand's picture

(post #54723, reply #5 of 25)

"I'm afraid it will look more like a restaurant than a cozy home. (And it is a 2 story house) "

It does not have to look like a restaurant. This was vented between the joists.

Cheers,

Peter

 

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MadMom's picture

(post #54723, reply #6 of 25)

Have I mentioned lately how much I love your kitchen?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

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Geoffchef's picture

(post #54723, reply #7 of 25)

Charming!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Beebs's picture

(post #54723, reply #8 of 25)

Wow, I never dreamed an overhead hood could be so classy. Shows what a little imagination will do. Your kitchen looks lovely! (and cozy).

Sandy

Fledge's picture

(post #54723, reply #9 of 25)

I don't believe I have seen this view of your kitchen.  Looks great.


That sqiggly grill is neat.


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Jo Dee Messina

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PeterDurand's picture

(post #54723, reply #10 of 25)

Hi,

The S grate looks good but I would not go for it again. Light small pans tend to tip if you you don't place them just right.

 

jocelyng's picture

(post #54723, reply #12 of 25)

I just saw your post and thought I would add my $.02 to the mix (I'm a kitchen and bath designer).


- cork in the kitchen:  it is becoming more popular in the kitchen.  While I have not personally been involved in a job that involves it, I have heard from a number of people that they love it.  One person who has had it for a long time is Dana Cowin, the editor-in-chief of Food & Wine magazine.  She's had it for at least 5 years, and I asked her recently how she liked it.  She says she loves it, but she was not happy with the installation.  I think it was pulling up on the sides.  Anyway, it needs to be well sealed several times with polyurethane and it should repel stains (they sit on top).  One good brand is called Expanko.  It will dent if you drop something pointy on it, but most likely your glasses and plates won't break if you drop those.  It is also much more forgiving on the feet.


- Stove on island versus wall:  beware of the ineffectiveness of downdrafts.  If you get a commercial-style range, you pretty much nix the possiblity of a downdraft.  First of all, commercial-style ranges don't come with downdrafts.  If you look at a mid-range, uh, range, they may come with downdrafts, and they can be effective enough.  You might also want to figure in how many burners you have going at once.  That might be a little much for a downdraft.  If you do put it in, you might consider having some countertop on the far side (12-18") to protect anyone standing at the island while you are cooking.  One other thing - when we redid our kitchen, I moved the cooktop from the island to the wall (and added a hood).  Personally, I am not a fan of hoods over islands unless the ceiling is very high and/or the island is very big.  Otherwise, it can overpower the space and be somewhat intrusive  when looking across the room (even when very nicely designed).


Hope that helps.


Jocelyn

Beebs's picture

(post #54723, reply #13 of 25)

Yes, thanks so much for the info. I think I'm pretty much convinced that my cooktop needs to be on a wall, and the cork is extremely tempting, although once I find out the price I may change my mind.

The other thing I was wondering about cork is how it would look next to hardwood, because it might be an open floor plan and I think I would use cork only in the kitchen prep area but not in the dining area or living area. We have lots of oriental carpets, so hardwood is the floor of choice, but I worry that the cork right next to hardwood might look a little strange because there's not enough contrast in color. Any thoughts?

Sandy

jocelyng's picture

(post #54723, reply #14 of 25)

Cork is actually pretty reasonably priced.  As for the contrast (or lack thereof), you can get a darker toned cork that will contrast with the hardwood.  As I recall, the Expanko website has samples of installations that have two colors, which would allow you to have a lighter color similar to the floor (assuming your floors are a lighter color?) and a darker color for contrast.  So many choices!


Let me know if you need anything else.


Jocelyn

uncommontree's picture

(post #54723, reply #15 of 25)

SB.


 


We are on the final throws in our Kitchen, varnish,misc. hardware, those hard to trim areas , etc.We talked about cork way back when but thought it would be hard to clean and may stain from grease and other kitchen related spills. We have a 5' Garland That Inga (my partner) loves and I had to design one whole wall around it,needless to say this was big fun. We opted for duel vent fans that filter the air and return it back into the house. We have a 2 storie Brick home and running a vent would have been a beast. The charcoal filters work very well. I have attempted to attach a couple of pic,s taken around Xmas, I think they are large and may take a bit to down load. Let me know if this is true and I can have Inga compress the file . It is after all 2:55 am. Sittin here enjoying the cold/bug/spor/goo? that my darling brought home from Illinois. On a cooking note. Colds Hate Garlic it really works. I hope this finds all of you well. Rick.

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MadMom's picture

(post #54723, reply #16 of 25)

Love that range!  Looks like a great kitchen.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

KarenP's picture

(post #54723, reply #17 of 25)

 Stunning.  What a joy it must be to spend time there.

uncommontree's picture

(post #54723, reply #20 of 25)

K.P.,


 


Thank you. Now if I could only find the time to finish all those little things . Being the builder/designer has its draw backs. But on a good note I get to do almost anything I want with Inga's OK that is. Rick

ChefRobert's picture

(post #54723, reply #18 of 25)

Rick, is the Garland made for home installation (AGA approved)?  We thought of a commercial Garland for our kitchen when we built it, but because of local code it would require 6-8" clearance on each side and a fireproof wall behind it.  Bob

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

uncommontree's picture

(post #54723, reply #19 of 25)

Hi Bob,


 


What we have is a commercial Garland. The back has 6" clearance+5/8 drywall covered with glazed tile. The sides have around 1 1/2" clearance and also have 5/8 drywall with tile. We do not use this unit to its full potential maybe 10 to 25% on any given day and 50% when we entertain. The two fans move a very large amount of air around and seem to work very well at keeping the surroundings cool. We could not find a range that would fit with our style of cooking short of spending 10K and up and we needed that money for the rest of the project. We bought the unit from a friend who buys and sells used restaurant equipment. If we were going to run this stove 24-7 I never would have considered it. For what we use it for it is big fun and a great conversation piece,not to mention a dream to cook on. Rick

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ChefRobert's picture

(post #54723, reply #21 of 25)

We had access to several used commercial ranges when we were planning our kitchen, several Garland and a huge Vulcan, that I absolutely loved, etc....  However, our local codes and a very strict building inspector would not allow such an installation unless it complied with the requirements for a commercial establishment.  Which probably would have required a fire supression system in the hood.  Too much to even consider!  Bob

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

uncommontree's picture

(post #54723, reply #22 of 25)

Bob.


 


It really is to bad that you were not able to but one of those units in your new kitchen. They are so well made and will last a lifetime of home use,maybe even several lifetimes. The person we bought our Garland from was telling us that it is a big trend now for the big dollar homes and big dollar kitchen redo's to use commercial equipment. Seems to not be a problem here in Wisconsin. One must however follow some common since rules . My wife Inga and I are both self taught chefs . I have done guest cooking at some of the nicer restaurant's in our area and Inga and her business partner run a catering business. We(they) do not use our kitchen for this due to the fact it is not nor do we want it to be certified. I by day am a builder/remodeling contractor and we build high end homes and do big dollar kitchen redo's. By night an ice cold Martine a hot griddle and a fridge full of fresh ingredients top if off with some nice Jazz and I am in heaven. I wish you the best. Rick

pamilyn's picture

(post #54723, reply #23 of 25)

Where are you in Wisconsin?. I am in Madison and in need of a kitchen redo (Maybe) Do tell....Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

MaryMiller's picture

Flooring and Wall is also (post #54723, reply #24 of 25)

Flooring and Wall is also important to make your kitchen looks better, mostly household use hardwood floor in their flooring and a white color on their wall.

SabinoS's picture

Kitchen cabinet, Wall and Floor (post #54723, reply #25 of 25)

I think the Kitchen cabinet, Wall and Floor are the most important sections to be focused when renovating your kitchen. There colors must be relevant to each other, my personal favorite combination is light colored wall with dark kitchen cabinets and floor. I have installed dark cherry kitchen cabinets in my kitchen which gives an extra-ordinary look to my kitchen.