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Kitchen Aid accessories

Sandra_'s picture

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Does anyone out there own the pasta and/or sausage attachment for their Kitchen Aid? If so, how much do you actually use it, and is it worth the extra money?

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #53778, reply #1 of 18)

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Yes, I have them all. Haven't used them more than 5 times in 20 years.

Catering_Chef's picture

(post #53778, reply #2 of 18)

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Never Used them. Don't bother unless you are really keen and can't live without them. I also have a manual pasta machine which has had no use. I love dry pasta and so do the Italians. I spent a lot of time in Italy.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #3 of 18)

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I got mine as gifts so it doesn't really matter to me that I don't use them all the time. Also, when we want to make potstickers, it seems almost impossible to get ground pork that has not been flavored in some manner, so we grind our own.

Sandra_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #4 of 18)

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Thanks for the opinions. I finally got a Kitchen Aid this week (just in time for Crash -- the Sequel. Damn, I missed having you guys to ask for advice!
Anyway, the new toy is wonderful, and I'm in the mood to experiment, so fire away with any suggestions, recipes, opinions, etc. BTW, it did come complete with pasta maker/food grinder (one of the many benefits of buying second-hand is that you often get features you would never dream of paying for new.) Having made two batches of pasta I am underwhelmed, but am looking forward to making my own peanut butter, sausages, ground pork, etc.

Cissy_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #5 of 18)

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Have the grinder and use it regularly since I learned how to make wonton soup (it's great for grinding pork and other meat). Don't bother with the pasta plates; I bought them & used them once and was less than enchanted with the result -- the pasta stuck to itself and was nowhere near the quality of the pasta that I can make with my trusty Atlas hand-crank pasta machine.

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #6 of 18)

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As one who comes from the town Kitchenaid is made in, I am a big
fan. I use my grinder often--ground turkey breast @ $0.99 instead of$4.59/lb.
for example. Also like the sausage stuffer for ground chicken or turkey
sausages, etc. Have the pasta maker but it is unused.

Ol'_Pro's picture

(post #53778, reply #7 of 18)

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I have the grinder/ sausage stuffer that gets used occaisionally; the fruit/vegetable strainer, I have used once, a pain in the butt; the shredder is used often for cheeses. I didn't want or get the pasta maker because I had heard they had poor results. Prefer my good ol' Atlas.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #8 of 18)

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Wow Gretchen...ground turkey...sounds good! How much fat do you add? Do you use both light and dark meat? If you add fat, what kind (chicken, turkey, etc.)?

Thanks - I'd love to get more mileage out of my grinder, not to mention save a few bucks.

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #9 of 18)

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I do like apple-chicken or turkey sausage flavored with basil.
I don't add fat--use white meat and use it for chili, or just
patties (with egg as binder).

Sandra_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #10 of 18)

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Gretchen, I ground some turkey yesterday, using bread crumbs for binder. I was a little disappointed -- in my opinion the turkey itself was too dry,and in need of some fat, while the bread crumbs seemed to just make it a gooey mess. (I know, that's a contradiction -- a dry, gooey mess, nevertheless, it's my observation.)I'll try an egg next time, thanks. Anyone else have any suggestions? Would adding a strip or two of bacon to a pound of turkey breast meat be a good idea?

Sandy's picture

(post #53778, reply #11 of 18)

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Sandra --

Congratulations on your purchase. I am green with envy.

I'm going to jump in with some advice from one of my cooking teachers. (I took a sausage-making course from wonderful Italian chef this year -- still enjoying the products, too).

Traditional Italian Sausage should contain about 30% fat (by weight, not volume). The only preservatives my teacher used were salt and pepper (more than you think, too. I'll look up the numbers tonight). Also, if you're moistening your sausage meat, try wine -- vary and experiment for flavour. Commercial sausages often contain a higher percentage of fat, as well as fillers and WATER.

The pork cut used is usually shoulder. Also, he usually recommends using half pork and half turkey for "turkey" sausage, as the turkey doesn't hold together well on its own.

It's not as fatty as it sounds, by the time you're done cooking. But in small batches of fresh sausages, I think you could cut down on the fat until you're happy. But remember -- where's there's fat, there's flavour.

I've had very good results with the methods I learned in class. While I was working on recipes, I would simply mix ground pork with booze and spices, and saute the mix as meatballs, until the balance of flavours seemed right. When it came to sausage-stuffing time, I could simply dump everything in, mix, and stuff. MMMMM...

Tomorrow I can post my recipe for Drunken Sassenach Sausages (Whiskey-Soaked Sausages with Toasted Fennel and Pignoli).

Happy grinding,

Sandy

StevenHB_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #12 of 18)

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My keyboard is covered with the drool your note just inspired...

Sandra_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #13 of 18)

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Sandy -- yes, please, post sausage recipes. The more the merrier. I'm still trying to justify the expense to myself, and, well, there's only so many chocolate cakes and loaves of bread one family can eat (especially two weeks before moving day!)

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #14 of 18)

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When I had to add fat to my turkey burgers, I added olive oil. However, we are talking about the original ground meat product and I'd be interested to know what fat can be added to turkey to moisten it. I am guessing poultry fat of some kind can be added to the meat in the grinding process. Possibly the trimmings of chicken breasts, etc.??

Walt's picture

(post #53778, reply #15 of 18)

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What else do you do with ground chicken... I just tried that and I am not sure what to do with it now.

Walt's picture

(post #53778, reply #16 of 18)

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Not sure where my other post went to. I ground some
chicken... or reduced it to pulp in the food processor... mixed it with egg and then coated with
panko bread crumbs and made a chicken patty. The
texture was not terrific. But if was pretty firm.

sanderson_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #17 of 18)

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Just a note to you sausage makers...when inventing and you're wondering about seasoning...whether you got enough onion of if the sage will get lost etc...try nuking a dab for a bug-free taste. Its faster than a pan-fried taste and more accurate since the browning in a pan fry can give too much of a carmelized flavor that won't be true to the batch.

Sandra_'s picture

(post #53778, reply #18 of 18)

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Mark, I often use ground chicken or turkey in meat loaf -- the recipe I use calls for ground beef, pork and veal, but ground veal is seldom available from our local supermarket, so I substitute the ground poultrt for results that are good -- not quite as good, but still very acceptable. My son also prefers ground chicken (or turkey) to beef for burgers.