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How to season a wood salad bowl???

soupereasy's picture

How to season a wood salad bowl??? (post #55731)

Have one inherited from DH parents. Has not been used for 20 years that I know of. No idea what kind of wood it is, though it has a rather pretty grain. No idea what kind of finish, if any other than salad oil, it has ever had. Would like to be able to use it for salad. Help!


 


 

MadMom's picture

(post #55731, reply #1 of 41)

It's lovely.  I have no suggestions to give you, but I know Peter works with wood, as does Napie, and there are probably others.  Someone can surely help you.



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PeterDurand's picture

(post #55731, reply #6 of 41)

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #7 of 41)

I use that on my pieces that aren't used for food but need feeding.

Gretchen's picture

(post #55731, reply #8 of 41)

You can make the same thing by mixing mineral oil and paraffin. This is what butchers use on their cutting boards.  But beeswax is a nice touch. You could also do that yourself--beeswax at Michael's and mineral oil at the drug store.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #2 of 41)

I'm always looking at this sort of question from the food side, not the woodworkers. I'd just scrub the inside with a good abrasive rub of lemon halves with salt, wash in normal sudsy water, rinse with warm and let dry. If you're really concerned, use a mild, mild bleach rinse and keep on going. I don't rub my salad bowls with anything I'm not cooking with, but then I don't treat or rub any of my wooden culinary pieces.
Edited to say it looks like maple to me.


Edited 7/7/2007 8:54 pm by Glenys

soupereasy's picture

(post #55731, reply #4 of 41)

OK, but if I put a dressed salad in it won't it mottle/stain the wood? Sorry, have always used pottery salad bowls.

Gretchen's picture

(post #55731, reply #5 of 41)

Yes, it will "season" your bowl. Wash it with some water and wipe it dry.  Either use it or put fruit in it. It will darken a bit over time if you use if for salads. Decide what you want it to be--and it will be such.  'o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #55731, reply #3 of 41)

It is what Glenys says. Use it, rinse it, dry it. You don't "finish" it. But never leave watery things  in contact with it for long. It will split. Been there done that. Even after all the right things were done.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MNMike's picture

(post #55731, reply #9 of 41)

Rub mineral oil into it every couple of months or so.  Otherwise, whatever you're making it it will taste like whatever you made in it last time.

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #19 of 41)

I have a number of wooden plates, bowls, platters etc and I never rub them with oil. I think oil begets oil and when it sits around, that's when it tastes. I wash them with hot soapy water and let them air dry and they don't smell at all, even the half century old versions.

samchang's picture

(post #55731, reply #10 of 41)

We inherited a wooden salad bowl a long time ago but now use it only as a hard skinned/peel fruit bowl. Whether it was the wrong type of wood or the 'seasoning' was incorrectly applied, I could always taste an off flavor to the food that touched the wood.

Glass or ceramic or even metal salad bowls for me!

Didn't wooden salad bowls go out of fashion in the 60s? Along with fondue sets?

TracyK's picture

(post #55731, reply #11 of 41)

Fondue sets came back, about 10 years ago. Still pretty popular. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

samchang's picture

(post #55731, reply #12 of 41)

Maybe it's an East coast thing?

I've seen them make a comeback at Crate and Barrel and the like, but I've never met a household that has actually bought one of these things.

Maybe I need to hang out with a higher class of people!


Edited 7/9/2007 7:28 pm by samchang

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #13 of 41)

You know, I think you've struck a chord because as much as it's been touted that fondue was making a comeback, I just think it's a generational thing and perhaps a regional thing. I don't know any kitchen retailer here who's really seen a comeback, except maybe in the chocolate fondue department. They have better options now for chocolate than they did decades ago.
I remember in the olden days.................

PeterDurand's picture

(post #55731, reply #14 of 41)

Out of date? Old fashioned? So what I say. If it tastes good, bring it on.

 

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #15 of 41)

That's not what I said. If anything, taking the spin doctor approach, it means you're young at heart. Heck, you're newlyweds, that explains it all!

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #55731, reply #23 of 41)

>>but I've never met a household that has actually bought one of these things.<<


Not that you've been in my household, but, I have one, jillsifer has one, and I think Pomona also picked one up when we all met TracyK in San Diego a couple years ago.

We did some serious damage at the Le Creuset outlet, I can tell you that much. In fact, I bought two of the fondue pots and shipped one to Biscuit.


~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

samchang's picture

(post #55731, reply #26 of 41)

Did you go to the Le Creuset outlet in Gilroy, or is there one closer by to the southland? We *almost* stopped by the Gilroy outlet last week when we were driving up, but caught ourselves when we wondered what we would do with another LC piece. Even a discounted LC piece.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #55731, reply #28 of 41)

no, this one was in the San Diego area, but there's also one right by me in Cabazon.


please. I can find plenty of uses for another piece of Le Creuset.
Of course, I only have four, counting the fondue pot


~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

TracyK's picture

(post #55731, reply #24 of 41)

Everyone I know that's gotten married in the last 15 years has one. :-)


I think I have three.


And I have actually used them... all three at a time, even (one for cheese, one for meat/oil, one for chocolate). I love doing fondue for New Year's Eve.


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Lee's picture

(post #55731, reply #27 of 41)

I love doing fondue for New Year's Eve.


We used to have fondue for New Year's Eve before the kids grew up and started going out.  This past year, we were invited to the home of friends and had bagna cauda.  Back to the future.

soupereasy's picture

(post #55731, reply #16 of 41)

I think that is the way we will go, and this bowl is probably late '50's early '60's.


 Been trying to get rid of things for a move and all I hear is "how old is it"? Seems anything older than a year is anathma! What ever happened to a little age being a good thing? OK, rant over, whew I feel much better thank you.:)

Lee's picture

(post #55731, reply #17 of 41)

Been trying to get rid of things for a move and all I hear is "how old is it"? Seems anything older than a year is anathma! What ever happened to a little age being a good thing?


LOL!  I get a little manic from time to time and start pitching things that haven't been used, or have seen better days, and DH and I always end up going through the same scenario.  DH, who's a saver, goes through the stack or pile and is always astonished at what is being discarded (he hasn't used it, missed it, or even seen it for who knows how long).  One by one, he holds things up and asks "Why are you getting rid of this, what's wrong with it?"  "It's old" comes the answer, to which he invariably replies "Will I get thrown out when I'm old?"        

soupereasy's picture

(post #55731, reply #22 of 41)

Have to go with your DH. I get somewhat better with age.


When she asked how old my piano was, almost flipped. Not that my poor old piano was on the slate.


I really was talking about washer/dryer/freezer type things. I know you don't replace those type of things on a yearly basis.

bktlush's picture

(post #55731, reply #40 of 41)

Your husband sounds exactly like mine! He will NOT get rid of anything that is the least bit useful! When we moved he balked over his tuxedo that had not seen the light of day for over 30 years. I told him if it still fit we would take it, needless to say it did not couldn't even get both arms in the jacket. Etc, etc, etc, etc over all these years.....

soupereasy's picture

(post #55731, reply #41 of 41)

I thank you all for your suggestions. Leaning toward the beeswax/mineral oil finish for the bowl.  I think it was Peter who suggested one which sounded just right.


I have refinished furniture, dining room set, piano, desk etc. and for those I did use a tung (sp) oil finish. Most of them were done in the mid '80's to early '90's and are ready for a spruce up. Apart from the fact that I was flying by the seat of my pants and had no one to give me advice, they look pretty fair.


Rosemarie.

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #20 of 41)

One thing about wooden bowls, especially maple and carved from one piece of wood as yours is, there's value in the wood. It's difficult to buy larger pieces now that aren't pieced because of tree size.

Lee's picture

(post #55731, reply #18 of 41)

Didn't wooden salad bowls go out of fashion in the 60s? Along with fondue sets?

 


I use my wooden salad bowl all the time, and occasionally pull out the fondue pot, mostly when the DGK are here.  They also love it when I set up the Chinese hot pot, just like their Moms did.


I think wooden bowls tend to get a bit gummy or develop an off scent if they aren't used often enough.  I wash mine in soapy water, rinse and dry it immediately, and it's been fine for many years.  I gave my mom's wooden bowl to my younger DD, a/k/a the salad queen, about 10 years ago.  She uses it almost every day and it's still fine after more than 50 years of use.  Who knows, DGD may end up with it.

Glenys's picture

(post #55731, reply #21 of 41)

Years ago, you know when we were younger but no less wonderful, Dansk used to sell those extraordinary extra large teak bowls. All the subsequent knock-offs were just too small so it's no wonder they're history. I used to tell my students to put the side bowls in their spa bathrooms filled with soap. Good recycling.
I love my large wood bowls but they're hard to get these days.

Meg's picture

(post #55731, reply #29 of 41)

If wooden bowls went out of fashion, then Granville Manufacturing (http://www.bowlmill.com/) sure hasn't received the memo. They manufacture wooden bowls (as well as wooden clapboards) of local maple, cherry, birch, and other woods. I understand that business is good, and they employ many of our students' parents.