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grinding nuts/poppyseeds with Kitchenaid

DJHinAZ's picture

If I get the food grinder attachment for my Kitchenaid (5 qt tilt head), would that grind nuts and maybe even poppyseeds?

Thanks in advance!

Heather's picture

(post #56274, reply #1 of 21)

I don't think it is fine enough for poppyseeds. I'll have to get mine out and look at the finest disc. I only use mine for meat so I use the coarsest disc.

Gretchen's picture

(post #56274, reply #2 of 21)

Unless there is a different food grinder than mine (I'll google) the grinder is for meats. It is a "worm" style grinder. Use a food processor for nuts. Grinding poppy seeds? Just curious, why?

Gretchen

Gretchen
Heather's picture

(post #56274, reply #3 of 21)

Kitchen Aid says you can use the grinder for breadcrumbs, nuts, firm fruits and vegetables.

Gretchen's picture

(post #56274, reply #5 of 21)

They can say that, but I would just never think to do it. I might grind dried apricots, etc.--if they were a part of a recipe like sausage. There is not a chance for something like poppy seeds, unless you are going to rinse them out of the grinder!!


Firm fruits. What would those be?


Breadcrumbs?  Hmmmmm.  Mine is an old/original metal one, with 3 dies/discs.  I would come closer to making bread crumbs with the shredder attachement. There is video on the KA site showing different attachments uses.


Maybe I'm just not innovative enough.   ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
roz's picture

(post #56274, reply #6 of 21)

I think what the poster means by grinding poppy seeds is mohn. A filling for cakes, cookies, etc. I believe poppy seeds are soaked and ground for these desserts. Sometimes you can find mohn in cans, but poppy seeds go rancid very quickly, so you really need very fresh poppy seeds.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KarenP's picture

(post #56274, reply #7 of 21)

   I make a walnut cake that needs finedly ground walnuts.  Electric grinders seemed to leave the nuts too oily rather than fluffy. I don't know this makes a difference in what you want to do. I use a manual, circular cheese grater.

Gretchen's picture

(post #56274, reply #8 of 21)

It isn't me--it is the OP. I would never grind nuts in it either!! Too many other ways to get it done. I'd use the FP.


If it is as Roz says that the OP may want to make  mohn, then I think a mortar and pestle or FP would be the way.  I dont' think you could even make peanut butter using the grinder to the KA.


 


Gretchen


Edited 11/28/2008 2:34 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
KarenP's picture

(post #56274, reply #9 of 21)

Same problem with the fp, depending what you're doing, the heat and power release the oils in a sometimes unfavorable way. Some things, don't matter but sometimes it makes all the difference.

Glenys's picture

(post #56274, reply #16 of 21)

Do you ever grind them in the food processor with some sugar? I make flourless nut cakes weekly and it's always in the processor with some of the recipes' sugar.

KarenP's picture

(post #56274, reply #17 of 21)

I'll post the cake recipe and you can tell me what you think.  It could well be that I don't know how to control the processor enough to make them fluffy rather than the the more dense, oily texture that I come up with.  

shelly's picture

(post #56274, reply #18 of 21)

I regularly grind poppy seeds in an inexpensive electric coffee grinder which I use for grinding spices - no need to add sugar .... just try not to overgrind because they tend to clump together. (that being the case, just put them in a sifter)

Glenys's picture

(post #56274, reply #19 of 21)

I've not a poppy seed user but I've been grinding nuts in the processor for decades. Glad to know the coffee grinder works. I bet your supply is fresher than any we get in North America.

KarenP's picture

(post #56274, reply #20 of 21)

Torta di Noci


 


8 ounces walnuts, toasted lightly, finely ground


6 extra large eggs


¾ cup sugar


Zest of one lemon


Pinch of salt


Confectioners sugar for dusting


 



  1. Butter a 9 inch round spring form

  2. Preheat oven to 325

  3. Separate the eggs

  4. Beat the yolks with ½ of the sugar until pale yellow and fluffy

  5. Add the lemon zest to the eggs yolks

  6. In a separate bowl, beat the whites with the pinch of salt to soft peaks

  7. Add the remaining sugar and beat to stuff peaks

  8. Spoon the beaten egg yolks over the egg whites with ¼ of the walnuts

  9. fold gently

  10. Add the remaining walnuts 1/4 at a time folding gently to preserve the volume of the egg whites as much as possible and just until the nuts are throughout the batter.

  11. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, bake until the cake is firm and golden on top and toothpick comes out clean.  Start checking at 45 minutes.

  12. Let sit on a rack for 20 minutes then remove from the pan and continue cooling.

  13. Before serving, sift confectioner sugar over the top.

  14. serve with nocino sabayon cream
Heather's picture

(post #56274, reply #4 of 21)

I just checked--there are two discs, the openings are about 4mm and 6mm. The booklet says that the finer one is good for raw meat, cooked meat for spreads, bread for crumbs. I think you'd need something much finer for poppy seeds, wouldn't you?

The secondary seller sites say that you can grind nuts, I've never done it--would you like me to try and report back? Or maybe someone who has already tried it will post.

pamilyn's picture

(post #56274, reply #10 of 21)

I would think you need a grain mill for poppy seeds.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Gretchen's picture

(post #56274, reply #11 of 21)

I'll bet a blender will suffice for those of us who are not into doing this kind of thing often--with all the provisos Karen brought up about heat, etc.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DJHinAZ's picture

(post #56274, reply #12 of 21)

Thanks, everyone, for your comments. I was, actually, thinking of a "mohn" for a german dessert... I made a mohnstriezel this week for thanksgiving, but I think next year I want to try something else, and I was already looking in the cookbook and it said something about "ground poppyseeds". The mohnstreizel I made this year didn't require the poppyseeds to be ground--just soaked (in milk). But something I was looking at said something about "ground poppyseeds", so I was wondering. I don't usually grind nuts myself--when I make linzerbars I usually use trader joe's ground almonds, which saves a lot of headaches. They used to sell ground walnuts, but not anymore. :-( I still have some in my freezer... probably should use them sometime soon. I never thought about grinding poppyseeds in a blender... I don't really have a blender, just a hand-blender. I wonder if the cuisinart would work the same...

assibams's picture

(post #56274, reply #13 of 21)

Poppyseeds are Mohn. For most recipes the Mohn is actually cooked and soaked so it plumps up quite a bit. The seeds are definitely too small for the KA food grinder, but I wouldn't worry. If you soak the seeds are plump enough to be squashed in a mortar and pestle, or you could even leave them unsoaked and whole depending on what you were making.


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #56274, reply #14 of 21)

Well, I was looking at a Schlesische Mohntorte (a Silesian poppy tart), and the ingredient list calls for 200g "freshly ground poppy seeds". The instructions say "...bring the milk to the boil in a pan with the butter. Mix together the semolina and poppy seeds, sprinkle them into the milk and butter mixture, wile stirring, and simmer over low heat for about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to cool down for about 10 minutes." So do you think grinding the poppy seeds are important? If not, then I won't worry about buying a grinder... I don't have a grain mill, but I thought the KA attachment would come in handy for other stuff, which is why I was considering it...

assibams's picture

(post #56274, reply #15 of 21)

I wouldn't bother.


However, an old cookbook I checked calls for using ground seeds before cooking, so you could always just grind (or try to *g*) the seeds with a mortar and pestle. Or you wait another week or two and I can send you some ready-to-use poppyseed mix I found at the store today ;-)



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #56274, reply #21 of 21)

I ahve to disagree here. Ground poppyseeds have a markedly different texture and flavor, at least to me.