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Food mills

whatscooking's picture

Tell me about your food mill.  I've been looking for one.  Today I saw the All-Clad version (119$)  It was heavy and seemed like it would do the job.  But I'm thinking I don't really a need top-of-line food mill.  It will mostly be used for pureeing tomatoes and sauces made with dried chiles.  Looking on the internet, I can find them as cheap as 39.99 (metal and plastic)  I'm pretty sure I want all stainless.  Does anyone have a one they like? 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Heather's picture

(post #54958, reply #1 of 26)

I got a really nice one with three inserts from WS for about $70. I can't see paying more for the All-Clad version.

whatscooking's picture

(post #54958, reply #5 of 26)

I was at WS yesterday and all they had was the All-Clad.  Grrrrr....


I'm thinking I'm going to try the restaurant supply shop near my house.  If they don't have what I'm looking for, then the internet will come through for me, I'm sure.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Heather's picture

(post #54958, reply #8 of 26)

There are lots on the internet. I just looked and saw the All Clad for $99 with free shipping and another one that looked similar but a little smaller that got raves for $39.95. How much do you plan to use it? If it isn't getting really heavy use maybe you could try one of the cheaper ones. i notice that there is a real variation in the sizes of the holes--unless that cheap one is really small, the largest holed insert is much coarser than any of mine. Some of the sites give all the information and some don't.
I'm not sure what the previous poster meant by "feet" unless she meant hooks that go over the sides of the bowl. I use mine in my extra KA bowl if I'm milling a large quantity and that works really well because it is tall.

Good luck.

knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #9 of 26)

WS was selling the Cuisipro not too long ago, maybe that's what you got.

Heather's picture

(post #54958, reply #10 of 26)

I think you're right.

knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #11 of 26)

Do you use it for mashed potatoes too? I'm looking at buying one.
I'm tired of buying those ricers. I must have bought half a dozen different brands. They are not worth a hoot.

Jean's picture

(post #54958, reply #12 of 26)

ARe you talking about a ricer like this?


OXO Potato Ricer Mine has 2 discs with different sized holes.  I wouldn't be without it.


They do have similar ricers with holes in the sides too, I think those make a terrible mess, the potatoes squirt all over the place.



 Luke 2 10And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.  11For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.  

 

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knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #14 of 26)

Yes. I've tried Zyliss, Oxo, you name it. Although I like the texture of spuds from the ricer, I won't be buying them anymore. Maybe the spuds we get are too tough for a ricer, I don't know. I even cut them in little cubes.

Jean's picture

(post #54958, reply #15 of 26)

Try cooking them a little longer.


 Luke 2 10And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.  11For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.  

 

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Glenys's picture

(post #54958, reply #19 of 26)

The Cuispro ricer is outstanding and I regularily do 20lb. at a time for class. I use the larger hole disc, even better.

knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #22 of 26)

For a Canadian outfit they are well hidden. Do you know if they have a website? I know it's available on amazon.com but I'd rather buy in CDN $ than USD, specially when it's Canadian made.

Glenys's picture

(post #54958, reply #23 of 26)

Cuispro is the brand, owned and distributed by Browne and Co., but they are wholesale distributors. Cuispro is available at every good cookware store but I bet for mail order Ashton-Green out of Ottawa would be a good choice. I'm going to check something else. Back in a minute.
If you'd like to order one from my friend, you wouldn't have to pay sales tax, only GST.
Her site is:
www.thestoreforcooks.com

Tell her I sent you when you email. She also carries the All-Clad one and could order Rösle.
Edited 12/5/2005 5:47 pm by Glenys


Edited 12/5/2005 5:49 pm by Glenys

knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #26 of 26)

Thanks, Glenys. Will do.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #54958, reply #24 of 26)

the potatoes squirt all over the place


Yes, and if you're accidentally given one of those as a gift, I can assure you that young boys like them a LOT for mud projects.


 


 


 

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Heather's picture

(post #54958, reply #13 of 26)

You can use it for potatoes but I never have. I hate having all that mess to clean up at the last minute and besides, my son likes to mash and does a great job.
They have the Cuisipro mill at Amazon for about $75 right now--that's the one I have. I've noticed that some of the cheaper ones are kind of small. There was one that looked just the same as mine but was only 8".

knitpik's picture

(post #54958, reply #16 of 26)

Decisions, decisions. :-)

assibams's picture

(post #54958, reply #2 of 26)

Mine is a WMF or Rösle, came with 4 inserts, and lives in the drawer (ever since my baby started chewing the mill hasn't left the drawer much for the last 3 years). The one thing I truly hate about it, is that it doesn't have those little 'feet' that let you place it above a container. Mine has handles or hooks on the upper rim of the mill, so that it hangs down into the pot or container. So, unless you have really high pots and containers that you'll use for straining into, choose one with feet.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.


Edited 12/4/2005 7:44 am by Assibams

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

whatscooking's picture

(post #54958, reply #6 of 26)

Thanks for the tip about the feet.  That's the kind of thing you don't think about until you are about to use it. 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Risottogirl's picture

(post #54958, reply #3 of 26)

I have an all stainless Italian one that I bought in a dusty shop in the North End (Boston's old Italian section) for $20. This was probably 10 years ago. I bought an identical one in Italy.


I don't remember the brand, it just says "machina" on the handle - it has 3 grids, different sizes - and fold out "feet".


I my mills all the time. 



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 12/4/2005 8:47 am ET by Risottogirl


Edited 12/4/2005 10:23 am ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

wisekaren's picture

(post #54958, reply #4 of 26)

I've used my old dependable Foley for years. I use it only for making applesauce; as the red skins get scraped clean, the applesauce turns pink!
Karen

Cissy's picture

(post #54958, reply #7 of 26)

I've used my old dependable Foley for years. I use it only for making applesauce; as the red skins get scraped clean, the applesauce turns pink!


My Foley belonged to my grandmother.  With the last batch of applesauce (made just the way you described), the threads on the thingie that goes underneath got stripped.  Snif.  It has processed a lot of applesauce, pea soup and pototo leek soup.

Ricks503's picture

(post #54958, reply #17 of 26)

Here is what Cooks Illustrated has to say on them:


 


Rating Food Mills   
Written: 9/2002

The most expensive (and most attractive) is also the best.

Food mills were popular with our grandmothers but were pushed aside as electric food processors and blenders appeared on the scene. Yet neither of those highfalutin contraptions can perform quite like a food mill. A food mill is a cross between a food processor and a sieve. You turn the handle and an angled blade presses the contents of the mill through a perforated disk, keeping any pesky remnants like seeds or skin safely out of your puree. Unlike a food processor or blender, however, a food mill does not incorporate air into the puree, thereby altering its texture. The result is a denser puree that is ideal for foods like applesauce or tomato sauce. Many of today's food mills are cleverly designed to fit snugly over a vessel that catches the puree, doing away with the need to awkwardly hold the mill in place with one hand while simultaneously cranking with the other.

We gathered five models, ranging in price from $15 to $90, and tested them by making applesauce in each. Surprisingly, all of the models produced a similar puree: fine, smooth, and free of unwanted material. Our tests thus focused on the food mill itself: how easy it was to crank, how efficiently it processed the apples, and how snugly it fit over a bowl or pot set beneath. One feature we found to be very important was interchangeable disks (fine, medium, and coarse) to adjust the fineness of the puree. The models with a fixed disk not only performed less favorably than their multidisk counterparts but were significantly more difficult to clean.

Our top performer was also the most expensive, the $90 Cuisipro, favored for its "perfect puree in relatively few turns" and the fact that it was "way easy to crank." That it was the best looking of the bunch, with its sleek stainless-steel design, was a bonus. The cheapest model, the $15 white plastic Moulinex, was a strong third-place finisher. It yielded "gorgeous puree" and was thought "very easy to turn." Though the plastic is not as durable as the stainless steel, for occasional use the Moulinex is certainly the best value. Ranking at the bottom of our tests were the Foley and the Norpro. The Foley lost points for bouncing around on the bowl and for having a fixed disk that made it difficult to clean. The Norpro was deemed "very inefficient," mostly pushing the food around on top of the sieve rather than through it.

In order of preference:

CUISIPRO STAINLESS STEEL FOOD MILL
Price: $90
Capacity: 4 quarts
Disks: Fine, medium, and coarse
Comments: "Easy to turn," "efficient."

VEV VIGANO MOULIN A LEGUMES (MOULI)
Price: $35
Capacity: 4 quarts
Disks: Fine, medium, and coarse
Comments: "Super easy," "reasonably efficient."

MOULINEX MOULIN A LEGUMES NO. 2 (WHITE PLASTIC)
Price: $15
Capacity: 2 quarts
Disks: Fine, medium, and coarse
Comments: "Pretty efficient."

FOLEY FOOD MILL
Price: $23
Capacity: 2 quarts
Disks: Single disk, fixed in place
Comments: "Bounces around," "difficult to clean."

NORPRO STAINLESS STEEL MULTIPURPOSE FOOD MILL
Price: $25
Capacity: 2 quarts
Disks: Single disk, fixed in place
Comments: "Hard to turn," "pops off bowl easily."


Cuisipro

Moulinex Of the five models tested, the top performer ws the Cuisipro (left), but it costs $90. The $15 Moulinex (above) did nearly as well, so it became the pick of the pack for its combination of price and performance. The plastic is surely not as strong as the Cuisipro's stainless steel, but for occasional use it works just fine.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

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MEANCHEF's picture

(post #54958, reply #18 of 26)

Cuisipro products are great - top of the line

Glenys's picture

(post #54958, reply #20 of 26)

Cuispro is great isn't it? I keep touting our Canadian design ingenuity.

I don't have the Cuispro, I have the old white Moulinex. Whatever it is, I want stainless or stainles combo so it will hit the dishwasher.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #54958, reply #21 of 26)

Everything Cuisipro that I have ever bought, I have loved.  The only exception is the box grater and In don't really have a complaint yet, but maybe.  The grater works fine, but I have developed major cracks in the plastic casing.  So far though it is holding together. LOL

Geoffchef's picture

(post #54958, reply #25 of 26)

Have you seen their Microplane box grater? Looks great but I balked at the price.


Edited to add: Whoops! I should have finished reading the thread before posting.


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 


Edited 12/5/2005 8:53 pm by Geoffchef

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary