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coffee grinders

KitchenWitch's picture

The recent coffee machine thread made me start this one.


about a month ago our latest coffee grinder began showing signs of impending doom - slowing down, bits breaking off...since we've been replacing them on the average of every 18 months, B suggested getting a burr grinder, rather than spending $20 on yet another blade grinder.


I purchased a refurbished KA A-9 grinder. I am in love with this thing! I love the retro styling, the fact it holds a pound of beans, and honestly, the coffee is SO much better. Even by the time I get to it, when it's 4 hours old, it is still really good. And the price for a refurb was reasonable.


it does scatter grinds a little, but less than DH did when using the blade grinder. One caveat - don't allow a curious DH to lift the little door where the ground coffee comes out, while the grinder is actually going - it shot ground coffee 3 feet across the kitchen counter!



~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

Jean's picture

(post #54397, reply #1 of 60)

Kewl!!

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Will Rogers


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Gretchen's picture

(post #54397, reply #2 of 60)

We used to have the KA grinder. Burr is definitely better.

Gretchen

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #3 of 60)

Question re burr grinders:  SO drinks Turkish coffee, the grind of which is even finer than espresso.  Is it possible to get a superfine grind from a burr grinder?


deej

ashleyd's picture

(post #54397, reply #6 of 60)

To get a consistent superfine grind you definitely need a burr grinder. But they're not cheap!


“In victory, you deserve <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Champagne, in defeat, you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #12 of 60)

Yes, I know they're not cheap :) ...in a moment of insanity, we actually talked about buying a commercial grinder, since there are fewer and fewer coffee suppliers who have a grinder that will do a true Turkish grind.  However, the least expensive commercial grinder we could find to do the job was well over $500 - we'd have to drink a h*ll of a lot of coffee to justify that.


deej

gjander's picture

(post #54397, reply #18 of 60)

Check out wholelattelove.com and coffeegeek.com for reviews of the best quality burr grinders.  They are expensive but do make a huge difference.  Wholelattelove.com has excellent buying guides and resources that explain the types and price classes of grinders.  For a good quality grinder capable of doing turkish coffee you will need to spend $300-$350 but it will last forever.  I agonized when purchasing my Rancillio Rocky a couple of years ago but I haven't thought about the price since and now wonder what took me so long to make the leap.


http://www.wholelattelove.com/buyingguide.cfm?BuyingGuideID=4


Gary


P.S. They have the Mazzer Mini--an excellent grinder--on sale for $50 off the usual $399 price right now...


Edited 8/27/2004 2:15 pm ET by GJANDER


Edited 8/27/2004 2:16 pm ET by GJANDER

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #19 of 60)

For a good quality grinder capable of doing turkish coffee you will need to spend $300-$350 but it will last forever.


Thanks for the info and link - I'll check it out.  Of course, by the time you add the exchange, $300 - $350 is more like $400 - $475 Canadian.  It looks like a burr grinder is going to join the ever-growing "want this, but can't afford it now" list.  For the moment, I guess we'll continue visiting our local coffee supplier every couple of days for a quarter pound of turkish grind.


deej

Aberwacky's picture

(post #54397, reply #20 of 60)

Of course, by the time you add the exchange, $300 - $350 is more like $400 - $475 Canadian.


I just got back to the States from Montreal, and had to keep reminding myself that the prices were in Canadian dollars (what bargains if you earn in US $!).  It got to be a joke with a Canadian colleague, especially when we passed a Dollarama store, now referred to as "The .765248 Cent Store."


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Gretchen's picture

(post #54397, reply #21 of 60)

 It got to be a joke with a Canadian colleague, especially when we passed a Dollarama store, now referred to as "The .765248 Cent Store."


In Hong Kong we went to the $10 store--HK$=about $1.50USD.


Gretchen
Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #22 of 60)

We who live in Canada, and surf American websites (ref. Amazon friday sales) suffer enormous currency envy :).  There was a time (early 80s?) when the dollar was at par, but that was long ago...


deej


<edited for grammar>


Edited 8/27/2004 3:12 pm ET by deejeh

Glenys's picture

(post #54397, reply #23 of 60)

Actually many products, including great Italian shoes, are cheaper in Canada because the sticker price is the same as the U.S. If you shop around in smaller Italian coffee stores etc, they often have the grinders at better buys than the U.S. prices, once you look at the conversion. It depends on the product and origin. If it's imported for nation-wide distribution by a Canadian company, then it's often a buy worth comparing, like Creuset. Right now the prices on Creuset at HomeSense definitely may win out. Not sure.

A couple of nights ago I sent a friend to HomeOutfitters on a mission to purchase a Creuset 7qt.(G-28) for a birthday. He got it for $117.00 including our 14.5% tax. Go figure.

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #30 of 60)

...many products...are cheaper in Canada because the sticker price is the same as the U.S.


Yes, that's absolutely true.  However, the currency envy I suffer comes from shopping on US websites for stuff that isn't easily available here.  If I really think about it, I guess my currency envy is inextricably mixed up with mail order envy.  I just don't get why it's generally so much easier/more efficient in the US than here.


deej

Glenys's picture

(post #54397, reply #34 of 60)

Now that's for sure.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #24 of 60)

too bad they don't include the KA burr grinder.

~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

ashleyd's picture

(post #54397, reply #25 of 60)

Yes, but I figure that you've got to drink an awful lot of coffee to keep that huge hopper fresh.


“In victory, you deserve <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Champagne, in defeat, you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #26 of 60)

not really - it only holds 1 pound of beans - we go through a pound in about a week and a half, two weeks... tops.

~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

assibams's picture

(post #54397, reply #29 of 60)

Wow, that's a lot of coffee! One pound lasts me about 6 months or so, longer during the summer. Of course we are tea drinkers in the morning...

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #31 of 60)

we only make one pot a day - Bill drinks most of it, then I have about 1 1/2 mugs of coffee when I get up.  We probably use more coffee per pot than most people - we like it strong.
When my brother was visiting, I warned him we like it pretty strong. He poured a cup, took a sip, made a choking noise and said "Man, that's like the Devil's coffee" and added some water to it. I laughed.

~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

ashleyd's picture

(post #54397, reply #32 of 60)

Well you guys are obviously used to it but I think I would have a caffeine high for a week after a coffee at your place! I have a similar problem with my MIL and tea, she makes it so strong it makes your lips pucker (turtle bum tea I call it) and she accuses me of making it so weak it's like cat's p**s. But we reach an amicable arrangement with the judicious addition of water.


“In victory, you deserve <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Champagne, in defeat, you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

UncleDunc's picture

(post #54397, reply #33 of 60)

>> But we reach an amicable arrangement with the judicious addition of water.

That's the argument for making it strong, you can always dilute it at need. Make it weak and there's no remedy.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #35 of 60)

>>(turtle bum tea I call it) <<


LOL!!! love the visual this gives me, having kept turtles as pets for years.

My term for weak tea (or coffee) is "water bewitched"


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

dixie1's picture

(post #54397, reply #36 of 60)

We probably use more coffee per pot than most people - we like it strong.
 I like strong coffee, DH does not. He won't even let me make the coffee for company. It is easier for him to dilute his with water, but I can't add more coffee to mine. I do keep a jar of instant just to add to my coffee when he makes it.

MadMom's picture

(post #54397, reply #37 of 60)

I think one of the problems with American coffee is bitterness.  I loved the coffee when we lived in Central America or traveled there.  It was strong and full-bodied without being bitter.  Sometimes when you use too much coffee here, it just ends up tasting bad.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Gretchen's picture

(post #54397, reply #38 of 60)

The Costa Rican coffee we got was SO smooth.  I love dark roasts but particularly Starbucks I feel is basically burnt.  Wolvie and I had this conversation Friday.  She said she found it so in places but not in Seattle.

Gretchen

Gretchen
KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #10 of 60)

>>SO drinks Turkish coffee, the grind of which is even finer than espresso.  Is it possible to get a superfine grind from a burr grinder?<<


this one has 16 selections for grinding. I have it set halfway between fine and medium.  The coffee is a bit finer than I got with a 20 second buzz with a blade grinder.


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #13 of 60)

Thanks for the response, RuthAnn.  When we bite the bullet, and buy an expensive burr grinder, I think we're going to have to do our research by taking coffee beans with us, and testing the grind before we buy.  That should be fun - not!


deej

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #54397, reply #14 of 60)

Want me to grind some beans on the finest setting and send them to you to check the grind?

~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #15 of 60)

What a nice offer.  I would love it if you had the time and inclination to do that.  What's the approved method on this forum of exchanging contact info?


deej

TracyK's picture

(post #54397, reply #16 of 60)

You can click on someone's nickname in the message windows and then choose to send them email via Taunton. When they respond it goes directly to you. :-)



"Ignorance is born of not knowing and can be cured with education.
Stupidity is born of not caring and the only known cure is death."


--Unknown

deejeh's picture

(post #54397, reply #17 of 60)

thanks, Tracy


deej