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Bake vs Convection vs Pure Convetction

Frankie's picture

I am staying at this house with a wonderful kitchen and it has 4 settings for the oven:

Bake
Convection Bake
Pure Contection
Broil

I understand what Broil is and have a good idea of what Bake is, but what's the dif between Convection Bake and Pure Convection? When would I use either one?

Is it an issue of how crowded the oven is (ie: 3-4 teirs of sheet pans for cookies) or is it to acheive a different cooking effect/ result?

Frankie


There he goes—one of God's own prototypes—a high powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live and too rare to die.

—Hunter S. Thompson
from Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas


Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi.

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh


macy's picture

(post #55204, reply #1 of 8)

This may be apples and oranges, but since my oven also has 4 settings, and three of them are bake, convection bake and broil, maybe the fourth one, Convection Roast, is the equivalent of your pure convection. It is used for roasting meats. On mine, convection bake uses the heating element in the fan as well as the heating element in the bottom of the oven. Convection roast uses both those elements, plus the upper (broiler) one.


Bake is the same as a conventional oven---no convection fan, and the heat comes from the bottom element only.


Edited 6/2/2006 6:55 pm by macy

DJ's picture

(post #55204, reply #2 of 8)

My Dacor oven:


bake: bottom element heats;


 convection bake: bottom element heats, fan blows that heated air around


 Pure convection: air is heated behind the oven and fan circulates it.


 

If you eat pasta and antipasta, are you still hungry?

Frankie's picture

(post #55204, reply #3 of 8)

But when is it best to use each option?

Thisa oven is a Dacor also.

Frankie


There he goes—one of God's own prototypes—a high powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live and too rare to die.

—Hunter S. Thompson
from Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas


Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi.

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh


helena's picture

(post #55204, reply #4 of 8)

It depends on what you're baking in my experience. I use convection for baking cookies, two sheets at the same time in the oven and they all turn out great and evenly baked. When I bake pies, I use convection also, but I'll only bake one at a time for best results. For pound cakes, I was tought to always use the 'bake' setting as the fan should disturb the dough. I use 'bake' for everything else (cheesecakes, other cakes).


If you want to make roast potatoes or meat, I'd use convection, it makes for quicker cooking and even browning.

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #55204, reply #5 of 8)

I have a client with this oven and Helena is right that's the way I'd use each choice.  Just watch your timing on convection bake it's usually a little faster than regular bake.

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

mer's picture

(post #55204, reply #6 of 8)

I have Dacor too. I love the oven.

Pure convection is the most even way of baking and this mode should be used 90% of the time. The 3rd element at the back of the oven and the fan turns on. You can bake as much food in the oven as you can fit in it and everything should bake evenly. The filter in the back of the oven prevents flavor transfer, so you can bake meats and desserts at the same time.

Convection Bake is for heavy items that you want baked from the bottom, so you can only bake one rack of food at a time. This is great for pizzas, breads on a pizza stone, thick lazagnas, and heavy turkeys ( 22lbs plus). The bottom bake element and the fan at the back of the oven turns on.

Bake mode turns on the element at the bottom of the oven. This does not turn on the convection fan but you will hear a cooling fan that cools down the electronic controller and the oven door. With this mode, only one rack of food at a time is recommended. Some people use this mode if they have heavy butter pound cakes or are braising something in a covered cassarole.

FYI, the broil element is a variable temperature element, so if you are broiling steaks, put it on high, but if you are broiling a lemon merangue pie or something more delicate, you can turn the temp down.

Frankie's picture

(post #55204, reply #7 of 8)

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

This is exactly the type of reply I am looking for. Great explaination - clear and concise.

Frankie


There he goes—one of God's own prototypes—a high powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live and too rare to die.

—Hunter S. Thompson
from Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas


Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi.

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh


mer's picture

(post #55204, reply #8 of 8)

No problem. I love my Dacor oven and I love talking about it. :)

Here is the use and care guide. You might enjoy reading it.
http://ww2.dacor.com/pdf/useandcare/65031revDs.pdf

I forgot to add earlier that when you are broiling, always close the door. You can open it to flip the meat, but don't leave the door open while broiling.


Edited 6/3/2006 2:40 pm ET by MER