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Regality's picture

Where? (post #45381)

I'm not usually a fan of online quizzes, but since one of the questions deals with a thread here, I thought it was interesting:  http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/yankeetest.html

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/profile


 



Jean's picture

(post #45381, reply #1 of 70)

Hey, that's a neat site,  Thanks.  I got 36%.  Definitely a Yankee.



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #45381, reply #3 of 70)

Well, stick a feather in my hat and call it macaroni.
26%

Wolvie's picture

(post #45381, reply #22 of 70)

very funny - 44% dixie, barely in Yankeedom, so they say - even tho most of my answers clearly marked me as a Michigander - seeing that the terms I use nailed me to either the great lakes or spot on in Mich. ;-) I guess it's that southern heritage thang. (not a typo)

 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

hcookie's picture

(post #45381, reply #30 of 70)

I got 39% Dixie and I have lived in Michigan all my life.  There is no southern in my ancestry at all.  The only southern answer was that I say "carmel". 

elizaram's picture

(post #45381, reply #2 of 70)

"3% Dixie. You are as Yankee as they get!!"


I thought the test was quite accurate. It was funny seeing the comments that popped up to the various answers, and they pegged me pretty well (grew up in eastern Massachusetts, have spent many years in the Western Great Lakes region).


One thing I've observed is that the definition of "Yankee" depends on your perspective. To the British, a Yankee is anyone from the US. To a US southerner, it's anyone north of the Mason-Dixon line. In the northern US, it means someone from New England. And in New England, a Yankee is someone who is New England to the core, whose parents and grandparents and great-grandparents all lived there, and who would rather die than put tomatoes in clam chowder. I come from a long line of Yankees... in the strictest definition. :-)




Congress [is] a massive organism that, amazingly, functions without a spine. --Patt Morrison, LA Times



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Lee's picture

(post #45381, reply #4 of 70)

Fun site, but this born and bred Midwesterner got 50% Southern, Barely in Yankeedom.  Go figure.

Regality's picture

(post #45381, reply #5 of 70)

What are some of the present influences in your life?


 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/profile


 



Adele's picture

(post #45381, reply #6 of 70)

Hey y'all, I got 48% dixie! 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Regality's picture

(post #45381, reply #7 of 70)

I'm a 36%-er.

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


http://regality3.livejournal.com/profile


 



Aberwacky's picture

(post #45381, reply #8 of 70)

Oh, my.  91% Dixie.


All but a short part of my 38 years have been spent in Arkansas.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
pamilyn's picture

(post #45381, reply #32 of 70)

So I bet you don't know what a bubbler is? LOL

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Aberwacky's picture

(post #45381, reply #49 of 70)

So I bet you don't know what a bubbler is? LOL


Well, I do, but only because I listen to "Whadya Know," based in Madison!


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Syrah's picture

(post #45381, reply #50 of 70)

I remember being confused by "fountain" on Sesame Street. To be a fountain was always on, and a bubbler was what you drank from.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Ricks503's picture

(post #45381, reply #51 of 70)

Anyone up for a Hero?

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

macy's picture

(post #45381, reply #52 of 70)

46% Dixie. Barely in Yankeedom.


I had a problem with "What's that road along an Interstate highway?"


We call it the outer road or outer drive, but that wasn't a choice. I don't use any of the listed terms, so I had to leave that one blank.


And we don't have drive-though liquor stores here, so I don't know what to call them, but I wouldn't say "I don't go to such" either.

Ricks503's picture

(post #45381, reply #53 of 70)

Don't have them here either, so "I Do not go to such". - because I do not have the choice.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Gretchen's picture

(post #45381, reply #54 of 70)

They are called frontage roads.


"I don't go to such" is pretty southern I think.  Just heard my SIL say it the other day.


Gretchen
Gretchen
macy's picture

(post #45381, reply #55 of 70)

They are called frontage roads.


That's what my grandfather called them (from Chicago area), but I would associate that more alongside a river than an interstate. I have heard a few farmers around here call them service roads, but that makes sense, since they use them to move their tractors, combines, and other slow-moving equipment. I guess we Midwest urbanites, stuck in the middle between Yankeedom and Dixieland don't really know what to call them :-) In town, they just have names like I-70 Drive SW.


"I don't go to such" is pretty southern I think.


You must be right about that, because if I answer the question, it puts me at 60% Dixie instead of 46%. That's a whole lotta dixie for one response :-)  Or, maybe that included the icing/frosting issue too---I didn't really have a strong tie to either term over the other. Use them both, but frosting more as a verb I suppose or the stuff in the bowl, and "icing ON the cake." Wow, I really am confused :-)

Heather's picture

(post #45381, reply #64 of 70)

They are known as frontage roads in California.

Adele's picture

(post #45381, reply #66 of 70)

Frontage roads in FLA, and I know that for a fact, because the one by the airport is called:  Frontage Road.  If I ever remembered to take it, it would actually shave off about 10 minutes time.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Jean's picture

(post #45381, reply #67 of 70)

I never saw one until we got to Texas. LOL.



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Aberwacky's picture

(post #45381, reply #69 of 70)

And what about FM roads in Texas?  Farm-to-Market, in case anyone is wondering.  For the longest time as a kid driving to Dallas with my folks I thought they were FM radio stations, LOL.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
MadMom's picture

(post #45381, reply #9 of 70)

74% Dixie...and it's funny, that several of my answers were common around the Great Lakes, where I have never lived.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

GShock's picture

(post #45381, reply #10 of 70)

I came up as 98% Dixie.


 


Has anybody heard of the word - "counterpane" ?   It is what my mom always called a bedspread.


 


gbs


 

Nihon's picture

(post #45381, reply #12 of 70)

Yep - I've heard of it, although more from books than from real people.


Anyone else know someone who calls a "sofa" a "Davenport?"  That's my grandmother's preferred term, which still cracks up my husband.

KarenP's picture

(post #45381, reply #20 of 70)

Anyone else know someone who calls a "sofa" a "Davenport?"  That's my grandmother's preferred term, which still cracks up my husband.

 


 I grew up with that one.

Jean's picture

(post #45381, reply #21 of 70)

'Davenport' is common here in mid Michigan. At least in the Dutch community.



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ouzo's picture

(post #45381, reply #48 of 70)

Davenport.  I haven't heard that in years.


Yeah, that was my grandfather - last name = Van Wyck (not 'wick'! but 'why-k')and born in Kansas.  Pretty dutch I suppose.

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

MadMom's picture

(post #45381, reply #23 of 70)

I grew up with "davenport."  There were some uniquely New Orleans terms I learned when we lived near there which I've never heard anywhere else, like the cabinet under the lavatory, the "lavinet."  Also, they love to say "can you ride me to work" rather than ask for a ride...I always picture people wearing saddles.  Also, they will comment that they "passed by my Mama's house yesterday" meaning that they didn't just drive by, they stopped in for a visit. 


I still can't figure out how I had so many Great Lakes terms, when I have never lived there, and none of my ancestors did, either.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #45381, reply #34 of 70)

53% Dixie--Father's side 100% Georgia Folk  Mother's side 100% Pennsylvanians with very Dutch influence.  Grew up in South Florida, graduated high school with only one other person that was born in Florida our of 350!  Every neighbor was from a different section of the country.  We didn't have much of an accent since we had so many different influences.


However, at my Father's mother's house it was a Davenport.  At our house it was a couch.  As a kid I figured it was because Nana's was hard, uncomfortable and you couldn't jump on it.  At home all three of us would sink into the softness and watch TV or jump like any other three monkeys would!


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com