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What are you reading?

shoechick's picture

We leave for vacation in two weeks and looking for suggestions for books to take with me.  I just finished "A Stopover in Venice" which I loved.  What have you read and enjoyed lately?

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Carole4's picture

(post #50797, reply #1 of 99)

The Monster of Florence a True story....by Douglas Preston with Mario Spezi. Fascinating.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #50797, reply #2 of 99)

Not holiday reading, but I'm engrossed in Naomi Klein's Shock Doctrine, and have just also started Imperial Life in the Emerald City, about life in Baghdad's Green Zone, post-shock and awe. In a more fun vein, I also just got my second copy of Short History of a Small Place, by TR Pearson, which just might be the funniest book I've read in decades. I either wore out my first copy, or lent it to someone - I honestly can't remember which - but decided I really have to reread it, just to keep my sanity in balance.





"lucky in love; unlucky in metabolism"
unknown

Gretchen's picture

(post #50797, reply #6 of 99)

Have you read Clyde Edgerton's books?  Great little stories of the south.  Walking Across Egypt was his first, if I recall. The Floatplane Notebooks is in a different and very poignant vein.

Gretchen

Gretchen
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #50797, reply #11 of 99)

No, I've never heard of him. I'll check him out at Amazon, though. Thanks.





"lucky in love; unlucky in metabolism"
unknown

Gretchen's picture

(post #50797, reply #13 of 99)

NOt heavy reading, but very very pleasant and respected Southern writer. Another OLD book but very good is Debby, by Max Steele.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Carole4's picture

(post #50797, reply #8 of 99)

Now I have 3 new books to read!! It's finally getting cool enough to go outside and read. Love that in the morning.

ouzo's picture

(post #50797, reply #92 of 99)

Naomi Klein will be interviewed on our local NPR affliate, KUOW, today at 9:00.  If you miss it, all shows are archived and can be heard later. 


http://kuow.org/


"The best tricks are the simplest and the simplest tricks are the oldest" -Simon the owl

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #50797, reply #93 of 99)

Thanks. I'd love to hear this. I find I can't read her book straight through - more like 20 pages, then move on to something lighter and frothier (like War and Peace, maybe?) then another 20 or so pages. So just last night I picked up Shock Doctrine again, and got myself worked up and angry, and now will go read something soothing and fanciful for a while -- maybe Crime and Punishment. But I will listen for her interview. Bright, bright woman!





"lucky in love; unlucky in metabolism"
unknown

Jean's picture

(post #50797, reply #94 of 99)

You are such a comedienne!



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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ouzo's picture

(post #50797, reply #95 of 99)

The Klein interview was good, I hope you get a chance to listen to it (I love streaming archives!).   I am still wait listed at the library for the book, so I haven't had a chance to experience her writing style.  Heavy you say?  I'll be sure to have some froth close at hand.

"The best tricks are the simplest and the simplest tricks are the oldest" -Simon the owl

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

Astrid's picture

(post #50797, reply #96 of 99)

I have just finished In My Father's Court, by Isaac Bashevis Singer, for the second time. This time, I really loved it.

Street Boys, by Lorenzo Carcaterra, a fictional account of the fall of Naples in 1943, mounted by a small group of homeless street children and one American Corporal gripped me for several days.

Presently I'm getting through Lunch at the Piccadilly, by Clyde Edgerton. Not my cup of tea at all.

Next on the agenda is Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton, which I should enjoy.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
AJ12754's picture

(post #50797, reply #97 of 99)

Was wondering -- you like Singer...do you also like Babel.  Just read my first stories by him and I am fairly blown away by them ... Ethan Frome is a really amazing little book -- for me, the most perfect thing Edith Wharton wrote although I also loved House of Mirth.  Just a thought...if you have not read Sarah Orne Jewett, you might really like her..

Cave obdurationem cordis

Cave obdurationem cordis

Astrid's picture

(post #50797, reply #99 of 99)

Am not acquainted with Babel or Jewett, thanks for the suggestions.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
madnoodle's picture

(post #50797, reply #3 of 99)

At the moment I'm reading Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson, Girls Like Us by Sheila Weller, and Weekenders, by Roy McGregor.  Of the three I like Girls the least, which is disappointing, b/c I was really looking forward to it.  She needed a more diligent editor, methinks.

I believe in compost.


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Maedl's picture

(post #50797, reply #31 of 99)

I thought Three Cups of Tea needed a better editor too. The story was so good, but the words clunked along with no grace. Mortenson deserved better!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Jillsifer's picture

(post #50797, reply #4 of 99)

I'm re-reading everything that I haven't had time for over the years--well, I haven't MADE time.


At the moment, I'm doing Huckleberry Finn, David Copperfield and MacBeth. Next on the list are Tom Sawyer and King Lear.


It's a JOY to revisit these old friends again.


 


 


I've never been a millionaire, but I just know I'd be darling at it.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

shoechick's picture

(post #50797, reply #9 of 99)

One of the things I love about my Sony Reader is that it came with 100 free classics, so I've been downloading them to my hearts content, you're right it's great to go back and read the great ones.

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Adele's picture

(post #50797, reply #35 of 99)

Jillsifer!  I got my Dad a beautiful set for Christmas of Huckelberry Finn, Tom Sawyer & something else.  I think there are 4 books in all.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Gretchen's picture

(post #50797, reply #5 of 99)

Have you read Ex Libris by Ann Fadiman?  I learned about it here a long time ago and am every grateful for an absolutely charming wonderful memoir.


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
LuciaK's picture

(post #50797, reply #16 of 99)

I love Anne Fadiman & "Ex Libris" is one of my favorites. "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down" is also excellent, although a bit more serious topic (Hmong refugees in the U.S. and an epileptic baby).


 


Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #50797, reply #18 of 99)

I'm reading Lee Smith's "On Agate Hill" , which I believe was your recommendation. So far, I'm enjoying it, but I find Smith to be uneven, so without a push, I wouldn't have started it. Thanks....

LuciaK's picture

(post #50797, reply #40 of 99)

I'm so glad you're reading "On Agate Hill." I think it's one of her best, right up there with "Fair and Tender Ladies." It reminded me of old-fashioned girl power books like Edna Ferber's "So Big," Betty Smith's "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," and Caroline Miller's "Lamb in His Bosom." The latter is one of the best books I've ever read & I don't think it's well-known outside of Georgia. The author was Ga's first Pulitzer winner, a few years before Margaret Mitchell published "Gone with the Wind." "Lamb in His Bosom" is about the poor, rural South during the Civil War. I think it's in paperback & it's well worth seeking out. It's written in dialect, but once you get past that quirk, it's a very enjoyable read.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Marcia's picture

(post #50797, reply #45 of 99)

I've never even heard of Caroline Miller and will look into "Lamb in His Bosom". Thank you, again.


"On Agate Hill" is excellent; I haven't read Smith in quite a while, but my impression is that I don't care for her contemporary fiction as much as the historical things she has written.

Gretchen's picture

(post #50797, reply #46 of 99)

She was really good "in the beginning" but I think fell off with her novel about her school cronies, if I recall correctly.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #50797, reply #47 of 99)

Yes, I remember the one you mention -- was it "The Last Girls" ? I didn't care for that at all.

Gretchen's picture

(post #50797, reply #48 of 99)

I think so.


One of the cutest things done, and a FUNNY book was Pete and Shirley.  A guy from the Raleigh paper lined up ALL the best southern writers and they each wrote a chapter in this book.  I think Clyde Edgerton started it, and then each had to build from that last chapter. It went FAR afield, hilariously, and then finally had to come to an end.  It was a hoot--about 20 authors, and you'd recognize them all.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #50797, reply #55 of 99)

I'll bet I'd recognize a lot, but I don't know about all. Will have to check it out.


Have you read any James Wilcox? I don't know why he popped into my head because it's been a long time since I've read him - "Modern Baptists" comes to mind.

AJ12754's picture

(post #50797, reply #58 of 99)

I was in the Strand last week and noticed they were selling Ed Ferber's Showboat in one of those "replicas of the first edition" editions -- what they heck are they called? Facsimile editions?


Anyway -- good price too.


The trouble today is that almost everyone is famous and almost no-one is interesting. (paraphrased Tina Brown)

Cave obdurationem cordis

LuciaK's picture

(post #50797, reply #62 of 99)

I'd call it a facsimile. All the joy of a first edition as the author first saw the book, without the price and the worry.


I've only read Ferber's "So Big," but I love the movies made of her books -- "Giant," and of course, "Showboat."


Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.


www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

AJ12754's picture

(post #50797, reply #64 of 99)

In high school I read pretty much all of Ferber but she just hasn't stuck with me like Willa Cather has...still, enjoyable and turned into even more enjoyable movies I think.

The trouble today is that almost everyone is famous and almost no-one is interesting. (paraphrased Tina Brown)

Cave obdurationem cordis