NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Washing dishes by hand

jyang949's picture

I've seen two old movies that showed dish being washed by hand. That wasn't the point of the scene, of course.

In both cases I had a hard time focusing on the dialogue because the dishes were put away without rinsing! One person took a dirty dish from a pile by the sink, washed each dish in the sink of soapy water, then put it on the drying rack. The second person wiped them dry with a dishtowel and put the dishes away.

Was this the way dishes used to be washed?

Janet

ACG's picture

(post #53035, reply #1 of 19)

Adele's picture

(post #53035, reply #2 of 19)

No.  Not an old way, nor the way those us without dishwashers do it today.


If you watch really old movies, even westerns, there is always a rinsing stage.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

soupereasy's picture

(post #53035, reply #3 of 19)

Were they English movies?

jyang949's picture

(post #53035, reply #4 of 19)

Not English. One was Our Man Godfrey, and the other was not well known at all.

soupereasy's picture

(post #53035, reply #6 of 19)

Only reason I asked, our housekeeper never rinsed but wiped dry right away. Hot water heater was only 4-5 gal.
My mother always said she could taste the soap, we kids didn't notice any.
Oh yes, we lived in England.

Gretchen's picture

(post #53035, reply #5 of 19)

It could be either way. We rinse. It won't kill you if you don't.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #53035, reply #7 of 19)

But it could give you a good case of the runs if you don't.


Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
      I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
evelyn's picture

(post #53035, reply #8 of 19)

my next door neighbours (Dutch) in Montreal, when I was growing up, just wiped dry the soapy dishes (they were washed in a full sink of sudsy, warm water.

I thought, 'neat, such a time-saver,' cause at our home EVERYTHING had to be rinsed.LOL

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
jyang949's picture

(post #53035, reply #9 of 19)

My mother went the opposite extreme. The dishes went into a tub of water and detergent (Lux Liquid). If it was just one dish, she squirt some detergent directly onto a scrubbie. Instead of filling a second tub with clean water and rinsing the dishes in that, she rinsed them under the faucet. Used up a lot more water, of course, but she thought that otherwise there would be residual soap. That's certainly possible, given that she used 'way too much detergent, IMHO.

Have you ever noticed that when the shampoo is almost gone and you swirl some water in the bottle to get the last of it, how easily the watered-down shampoo foams, cleans, and rinses out? Very little is shampoo is actually needed. It's water that does most of the cleaning. I tried storing a larger supply but found that pre-diluted shampoo is unpleasantly cold and harder to dispense accurately.

Those foam dispensers for hand soap and dishwashing liquid don't have these problems. Foam is easier to apply than liquid and doesn't have that cold feel. Less detergent is used, so less rinsing needed. Great invention. :)

Janet

roz's picture

(post #53035, reply #10 of 19)

You are right about the use of dish detergent (and shampoo) being over used. I have a clear bottle that I fill with detergent and stick one of those olive oil plugs in the top. The detergent comes out s-l-o-w-l-y and I use less detergent.

I have a double sink, use one side as a hot water detergent wash, the other side I have a basin in the sink and fill with hot water for rinsing. I only dry my knives and wine glasses by hand. The rest of the dishes air dry. I don't use that much water by washing this way.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KitchenWitch's picture

(post #53035, reply #11 of 19)

>> I tried storing a larger supply but found that pre-diluted shampoo is unpleasantly cold and harder to dispense accurately. <<


and unless you are using sterile water and an utterly sterile container, you are leavign yourself open for bacterial growth, as you are watering down the preservative in the shampoo.


 


~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

TracyK's picture

(post #53035, reply #13 of 19)

I just use a dime-sized dollop of shampoo (and I have a LOT of hair!!) and stick my head back under the shower briefly.


"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #53035, reply #14 of 19)

same here. although I don't have as much hair as I used to!

~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #53035, reply #12 of 19)

The Dutch still don't rinse their dishes.  Dishes go from the soapy water to the drying rack, sometimes dried with a dish towel, sometimes left to air-dry.  It amazed me to see this -- I always always rinse with hot water.  Imagine wine glasses with some soapy residue and how the wine would taste!!  But I think the Dutch do this to conserve water, being the very very conservative folks that they are.  Cheers, Bonnie

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #53035, reply #15 of 19)

Yes, I noticed this when I lived in Enschede for 3 months in the late 90s! I thought it was really weird, and when it was my turn to do the dishes I *always* rinsed, but I must say I never had any GI problems due to soap... the only time I had some weird GI issues was when I went to an Indonesian restaurant... I had food that was a little too hot for my insides!

Valley's picture

(post #53035, reply #16 of 19)

My husband's step-father lives in Lincolnshire, England and he is so fussy about washing and rinsing dishes he will not let anyone else do it.

jyang949's picture

(post #53035, reply #17 of 19)

That sounds just like my husband's uncle Holdy. I first met him at his home in rural PA. He gave us a lunch with some unusual things like venison burgers and stewed pig feet. (For the record, I tried some of everything.)

When it came time to clear the table , I jumped up and said "I'll wash the dishes!" My husband and his sister immediately shook their heads at me and mimed "sit down." Uncle Holdy was so particular about housekeeping, he had never let anybody help with the dishes or even put them away.

Janet

Marts's picture

(post #53035, reply #18 of 19)

Wish I had someone like that in my family...

Valley's picture

(post #53035, reply #19 of 19)

If I make dinner it is my to have someone else do the dishes.