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Someone got her passport......

SallyBR1's picture

YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My AMerican passport arrived yesterday!!!!!!!

Now I can relax, if something happens back home I am free to go....

by the way, does anyone know if I need a visa to go home? I should have asked about it but forgot. When you become an American, that citizenship has to come first and you should not portray yourself as a citizen of any other country. I am now wondering if I can enter Brazil using my Brazilian passport or if that would be against the law.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

assibams's picture

(post #52760, reply #1 of 18)

Yay!


My mom has dual citizenship (Sweden and Austria) and uses them interchangeably. Not really of importance now that both countries belong to the Schengen regulation (no custom controls when travelling), but back when neither of the countries was part of the EEC she showed the Austrian passport when entering Sweden and vice versa, because tourists weren't checked when entering.


Even though the US can tell you that they'd like to see you be primarily American, they cannot take away your Brazilian rights. They can demand that when within the US, but I am sure Brazil claims the same thing for you when you're there. If travelling to Brazil you are still a citizen of Brazil and therefore shouldn't need a visa. I doubt the consulates or embassies would even be able to issue you a visa.


Emma is a dual citizen. Here in Germany she is seen as German first, but that doesn't mean she cannot have her Austrian passport, too.



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #2 of 18)

But, how would I deal with the stamps in the passport? For instance, when coming back from Brazil, I enter the US with my American passport, but they will see that there was no visa, and that I did not use that passport to enter Brazil since there will be no stamp on it?

I am a little confused......

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Heather's picture

(post #52760, reply #4 of 18)

To avoid confusion, I always travel with my US passport only. I knew there would be too many questions otherwise. But I have French/American friends who use both so it can be done.

assibams's picture

(post #52760, reply #6 of 18)

That's a good point. Travelling in Europe by car we obviously never had that problem. Still I doubt that Brazil would issue you a visa, because you still are a citizen. Best to inquire with the embassy.


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #7 of 18)

It is pretty much impossible to get someone in the Brazilian consulate to pick up the phone. I am going to try the email route and see what happens.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

assibams's picture

(post #52760, reply #8 of 18)

Ugh, can you phone the embassy in DC instead? Those seem to be more competent normally (at least true for Austria LOL)


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

courgette's picture

(post #52760, reply #15 of 18)

DH was born in Germany at a Canadian base. When he was 21 he had to choose as Germany did not allow dual citizenship at that time. Too bad as DD who is studying in Paris would dearly love to have European citizenship.


Mo

courgette's picture

(post #52760, reply #16 of 18)

Congratulations Sally! Pretty exciting to have dual citizenship. Which reminds me, we need to renew our one and only, as it expires end of Sept, which means its already expired.


Mo

leonap's picture

(post #52760, reply #3 of 18)

Great! I know that is a relief for you.

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #52760, reply #5 of 18)

Sally, when flying, I stick to one passport, specifically because of the entry and exit thing.  They need to correspond.  cheers, Bonnie

DianeGaye's picture

(post #52760, reply #9 of 18)

I use my American passport when travelling to the US and my French one when coming back home. But I have been told not to let the customs guys see that you have two passports - it may be illegal. For the Americans, I am American. Period. For the French I am French.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #10 of 18)

The only complicating factor is the visa. Americans are required to have a visa to travel to Brazil, but they don't need one to enter France

so I don't quite see how I could do this without being obvious that I did it :-)

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

MadMom's picture

(post #52760, reply #11 of 18)

I googled and got this information from the Department of State web site:


U.S. citizens also possessing Brazilian nationality cannot be issued Brazilian visas and must obtain a Brazilian passport (from the Brazilian Embassy or Consulate nearest to their place of residence) to enter and depart Brazil.  Airport officials will check for Brazilian visas upon arrival and departure.  In addition to being subject to all Brazilian laws affecting U.S. citizens, dual nationals may also be subject to other laws that impose special obligations on Brazilian citizens. 




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #12 of 18)

I don't quite "get" it. First it says they cannot be issued a visa, and then it says airport officials will check the visa....

am I misunderstanding something here?????

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

MadMom's picture

(post #52760, reply #13 of 18)

My guess is that the airport officials will check for visas on all non-Brazilian passports.  Why don't you just call the State Department or Brazilian consulate, explain your situation, and see what they have to say?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #14 of 18)

I will do that first thing tomorrow morning!

thanks, Sharon!

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

DianeGaye's picture

(post #52760, reply #17 of 18)

OK didn't know that you would need a visa. I usually use just my French passport since I live here and that avoids any complications. Do Brazilians need a visa to enter the US ?

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52760, reply #18 of 18)

Yes, those things are always reciprocal - if a country demands visa from a particular kind of citizen, their country will do the same.

Brazilians don't need a visa to go to France or many other European countries, but they do need for the US and Canada.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com