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msm-s's picture

So, I bought a house :-)
Great old hardwood floors, original UNPAINTED wood trim throughout, 10' cielings, and enough space for my son to grow and me to have a real painting studio again AND a separate sewing and craft room.
Built 1922, but the last kitchen reno must have been in the early 1960's at the very latest.
But that's great-- it helped keep the price down, and now i finally get to design whatever I want!

No pictures to post, but here's some current stats:
-narrow layout: 15' x 9' (can you believe this is a huge improvement over my old smaller kitchen? lol)
-hideous medium dark wood panelling obviously applied over the old walls, with touches of typical wallpaper of the era- green/brown/yeller kettles and coffee pots.
-kitchen cieling has been lowered to maybe 8 or less
-top and bottom ovens built into wall (actually, wall bumps out to accomodate them) with separate cooktop jutting out in the "L" counter that bisects kitchen leaving narrow passage into second half.

I've tried searching the posts here at CT as i know some of you have reno'ed your kitchens in recent years, but i'm not seeing many pictures. As a very visual person, I need pictures to get me started. Please post pix of your favorite kitchen features, or links to helpful websites. A friend is bringing me an Ikea catalog when she comes back from Boston, and in the meantime I've been drooling over their stuff online.

I also welcome ALL advice!
Who knows, once I have a decent kitchen, i may actually start reading more of the cooking threads and forget the political ones! :-)

plantlust's picture

(post #50914, reply #36 of 179)

I'm with you. To me painted white trim screams plastic and if it's FANCY painted white trim, I want to hunt down the IDIOT who painted it white & make them strip & refinish it.

Can you tell I'm in the midst of stripping painted SEARS trim (baseboards, window & door trim)? UGH.

Drying out. 3 fat dead mouzies in traps, proof that winter is coming early.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #39 of 179)

Well, I guess I won't be posting any pics of my kitchen.   


No, I don't have fancy trim, just the plain pine trim that was here when I moved in.  It was stained, but I painted it white because I prefer crisp white trim.  To each his own.


Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #40 of 179)

FYI, I'll show you why i don't think i can stand to live with my kitchen for 6 months- although i may have to; i don't know how long it will take to A) choose a good contractor (or Loew's-- that's a good tip. I didn't know whether clients were actually happy with their work) and B) get everything in and done.

Just for fun, these are 2 pix of the kitchen from the info sheet on the house. I drew the bright aqua line to point out how LOW the existing vent-a-hood hangs, LOL

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msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #41 of 179)

okay, to justify my pruchase, here's a pic of the living room. house was built in 1922 and it is loaded with charm (except for the hideous 1960's kitchen).

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msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #42 of 179)

okay, now here's 2 looks i really like from IKEA, and i think parts are somewhat do-able in the space i have. The ceiling has been lowered, and if I can take it back up to 10', i can possibly get an effect with tall cabinets like in the first picture. I like the sage color of the walls in the second picture, and while i've been wanting blonde wood and possibly blonde wood countertops, the black sure looks purty here...

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TracyK's picture

(post #50914, reply #57 of 179)

Contgratulations on the new house!


I know other folks rave about Ikea kitchens and cabinets, and I think they look great in the catalog and in pictures, but in person they look and feel cheap, IMO.


I've looked at more than 50 homes over the course of the last 6 months, and I can spot an Ikea kitchen from the dining room.



CT poster in bad standing since 2000.


Edited 9/22/2008 10:35 am ET by TracyK

msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #58 of 179)

That's what i thought because i didn't know how they'd expanded their styles I tend to think of that color laminate when i hear "Ikea". when my friend got all excited about my redoing a kitchen and offered to bring me back an Ikea catalogue from Boston, I accepted while thinking in my head i'd just toss it quietly. But i've seen one IRL that surprised me, quality-wise and i do like the styles i see in wood and glass, as posted above. Inspired by that, I just went to Lowe's and Home Depot and saw some similar stuff in their showroom and may go with that line, depending on pricing.
The whole house is pretty authentic to 1922 except for the kitchen, and I surprise myself, but I'm ready for some nice contemporary amenities.

Edit to add: What Pete said about not liking sub-standard door and window trim actually applies to me too, because i have had the pleasure of living in houses circa 1930 and easrlier, where the woodwork is wide and lovely and well-made, so newer trims that skimp are annoying to me, though i understand not to everyone. For my purposes, Lowe's or Ikea custom cabinets will do just fine. I'm not looking to create a big-budget masterpiece kitchen, but attractive, functional and appropriate for the average person.


Edited 9/22/2008 11:01 am ET by msm-s

msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #59 of 179)

Wow- I see what all the buzz is about! Gorgeous, practical, big, and a beautiful view out the window on top of all that!
Too splendid for words, really. I can't let it get me down and think "why bother if i can't have that?" LOL-- I'm not as serious a cook as most of you aropund here, but i used to enjoy cooking and am looking to create a kitchen pleasant enough to get me back into enjoying it again and trying more daring stuff.
Some wonderful wonderful ideas-- thank you for sharing! You should consult on kitchen remodels, you really should!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #50914, reply #67 of 179)

DH kids me that we have a house attached to our kitchen--seriously, though, we built from scratch so I was able to design mostly what I wanted, and probably spent 70% of my house design time on the kitchen.  Hopefully, this will be our last house, so I did it the way I wanted.


Thanks for the compliments!  I spent untold hours poring through books and magazine and websites to get ideas.  The Taunton Idea books are a great place to start--they are filled with problem-solving pictures.  I think I got my shelf-wall from one of them.

http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/the-kitchen-idea-book-joanne-kellar-bouknight-070523.html

Of course, the Not-So-Big-House books are excellent resources, as well.


They even have a kitchens for bungalows book: http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/the-new-bungalow-kitchen-peter-labau-070905.html, but I haven't read it to see.  If it's a Taunton book, though, it's bound to be good.


Congratulations on the new house!  Different neighborhood, I take it?


Leigh


Strengthen your immune system; eat more dirt!


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #70 of 179)

Ok, finally took some pics this morning and managed to compress them on a conference call, so here goes...


First up is the raised dishwasher, the sink is regular 36" height on the right of it.  As I said, if I'm using the food processor or something like that, I put it up there, so it's not in my work area. 


Next is another view of the raised dishwasher, showing how that 42" height goes right into the eating bar.  Then, there's 4" drop to my work peninsula.  Since I'm height enabled, I wanted that raised 2" higher than standard height.


Spend alot of time thinking about how you cook, how you prep, what do you find annoying about your current layout/workspace, what do you enjoy about it, etc.?  I spent well over a year thinking about this and the end result is a space that functions well for me.  For example, these drawers under my work peninsula.  The designer first wanted to have 3 same size drawers in there.  I decided i wanted one shallower drawer on top, so that I could have most of my utensils handing for prepping, then the two deeper drawers for mixing bowls, liquid measuring cups, sifters, etc.  Pretty much everything I use in my every day cooking and baking is gotten from those drawers.  I used to hate having to walk back and forth and around my kitchen to gather all the supplies I need.  Now, everything is just a few steps away.  I've included a few pics of my mise en place from the scones I baked this morning--except for the baking sheet, everything was stored under the work peninsula.  The sink is just a step back and a turn, so it's real easy to put things in the sink as I'm done with them.  I tend to be a neat cooker, I don't like my work area to get too messy.  ;-)  The flour, sugar, scale, etc. are all stored in the drawers next to the cooktop which is just one step from the work space.  The ready-to-go pic, shows how close the oven is, again just a couple of steps from the work space. 


Then there's the pullout rack next to the cooktop.  The original plans, I noticed the cabinet designer had a 3" filler there, and 24" wide drawers to the right of the cooktop (where I keep the flour, sugar, etc.)  I decided didn't want to waste those 3" and I didn't really need 24" wide drawers, so I put in that slide out rack.  I was a bit disappointed that the shelves are not adjustable, as I was hoping to put some of the oils that I frequently use there.  But, the bottles don't fit, so I have my tea bags, salts and peppers there.  It's still very convenient storage for those things.


Then there's my backsplash over the cooktop which I LOVE!  The decorative tiles are handmade by a couple in Vancouver.  Beautiful.  The field tiles are from a local tile shop.  I spent months agonizing over the backsplash.  I wanted something dark enough that it would set off the lighter cabinets and look good against the green granite.  I think it came together pretty good.


Probably the biggest disappointment is the pantry.  I didn't get a pic of that, but it's one of those fold out storage things with shelves for canned goods on the front and back of the fold out.  It's handy, it can store alot of stuff, but again, the shelves are not adjustable.  So, I can't store alot of large sized cans, different flours, pastas, rices, other things that I would prefer to be able to store.  The whole back side of the shelving for canned goods is empty because I don't use that many canned goods.  And, the areas that I can put the larger, odd sized things are crammed full.   Also, because it's at the end of line of cabinets, next to the wall and behind my kitchen table, it's somewhat awkward to access it.  I wish I had gotten slide out drawers, instead of this.  But, it is what it is and it's definately better than what I had before.


So, spend a lot of time thinking, browsing pics of other kitchens, sketching different ideas.  Be careful of using the big box stores for the actual installation services.  Around here, people have had alot of problems with the contractors they use, poor quality, etc.  It might be a regional thing, so check references carefully!


Edit to add:  Sorry about the duplicate pics.  I had problems uploading and thought that I had lost all the attachments, so I started over.  Then, realized the original pics were still in the list. 



Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux


Edited 9/22/2008 11:36 am ET by AnnL

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

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TracyK's picture

(post #50914, reply #71 of 179)

Beautiful, Ann. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #72 of 179)

Thanks.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #73 of 179)

I just realized that in the DishWasher2 pic, you can see the horse fencing out the window that's over the kitchen sink.  That's one of my favorite things--being able to look out the window at the horses while I'm washing dishes.  :-)

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

TracyK's picture

(post #50914, reply #74 of 179)

It's just so warm and friendly looking. All of these kitchens are just really, really lovely.


Le sigh. I feel like I will never get there.


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #76 of 179)

you will.

TracyK's picture

(post #50914, reply #77 of 179)

Thanks. :-)


I'm working on it, LOL.


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #78 of 179)

Oh, you will.  I wasn't sure I would ever be able to do this, and here it is! 

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

roz's picture

(post #50914, reply #80 of 179)

"...That's one of my favorite things--being able to look out the window at the horses while I'm washing dishes."

A life-affirming view, green grass and animals.
I see dairy cows, cattle, sheep, horses and donkeys.
What could be better.

Somehow I pictured your raised dishwasher about one foot higher! Silly me.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #82 of 179)

That's what I'm wondering about. Is there a limit to how high it will go, or is it just the most practical counter height? I was picturing big drawer under, and top as high as a low overheard shelf...

roz's picture

(post #50914, reply #83 of 179)

Yeah, no bending over at all!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #84 of 179)

and stretching is good for tummy muscle tone!

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #85 of 179)

It's only 6" higher but it's amazing the difference that 6" makes.  If it were any higher, then the counter above really would be unusable. 

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

msm-s's picture

(post #50914, reply #86 of 179)

The space could be usable as storage tho, possibly with a cabinet on or over it. So my question is, aside from the issue of counter space, are there limits to how high you can place a dishwasher? thanks-

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #90 of 179)

I don't know.  You'ld need to check with a plumber to see if there would be any issues with having the plumbing go up that much higher.  I don't see that there would be any issue from a cabinet/carpentry standpoint. 

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Englishmaid's picture

(post #50914, reply #87 of 179)

Thanks Ann - your kitchen looks fab and very well thought out . Because of you I realise that I've got  a misenplace and never knew it !! Crikey ! The things that you learn here ...


 

TracyK's picture

(post #50914, reply #89 of 179)

"Mise en place" refers to the act of putting things in place (ingredients, tools, etc.) before cooking. I don't think it's an actual object. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #91 of 179)

Thanks, but as Tracy said, mise en place is getting all the ingedients prepped and ready before actually starting to combine everything.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Englishmaid's picture

(post #50914, reply #92 of 179)

Yeah, sorry, I knew that - was just joshin' !!

AnnL's picture

(post #50914, reply #93 of 179)

Ah, that subtle English humour!  So, subtle it went right over my head.  :-(

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Englishmaid's picture

(post #50914, reply #103 of 179)

So subtle it weren't funny !!