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For the runners out there....

SallyBR's picture

Don t know how many we have here, but a word of caution: I was running on Sunday morning, started around 9AM, finished close to 10AM, very sunny and temperature not yet at full blast, maybe mid 80's?


on the last mile I felt funny 'cold shivers' down the back of my neck - I did not think much about it, kept running, it felt kind of interesting to have a cold shiver when it was so hot - well, little did I know that those are one of the signs that you are approaching a heat stroke - never ever continue running, stop, walk, try to get some water, get your temperature down and resume jogging if you feel back to normal.


We are having a hard time adjusting to run in this weather - normally we have the full Spring in oklahoma to get used to the humidity and temperature, but since we were running in Paris for so many months, we are totally out of conditioning for it.


Anyway.... make sure you take it easy when exercising in the Summer, even if it is indoors.


 


 

 

dixieleigh's picture

(post #41141, reply #1 of 57)

Sally, my husband had a heat stroke about 6-7 years ago. He had been loading hay bales onto a truck (dead hot, not enough water). He finished and got into his truck to drive home, started cramping ALL OVER. He got out, laid on the asphault under his truck trying to cool off. A friend who had been helping was following him and had a cooler of ice which they used to cool him down.


He really still has to watch it when working outside in summer. AND drink LOTS of water. He can start cramping up all over again. I think once you have had a heat stroke, your tolerance is much lower. He is very careful now.


Now his problem is falling off a ladder yesterday and injuring his hand. It is swollen, but he won't go to the doctor - he said a doc would put him in a cast and that would be worse than just 'babying' it for a while. He cannot play golf and I thought I could get him to go the doctor by telling him his hand may never heal properly and he might never play golf again. DH (and this is dummy husband) still won't go and get X-rays. I am through arguing with him.


 


 

 

 

StevenHB's picture

(post #41141, reply #11 of 57)

If you're exercising (or working) outdoors and sweating for a long time (more than an hour), then you should probably be drinking some sports drink instead of some of the water.  The sports drinks include sodium and potassium which you tend to lose when you sweat.  They also usually contain some carbohydrates (aka sugar) that will help you to perform better over long periods of time.


Note that this only really applies when you are exerting yourself for more than an hour - if you're not, then you're just adding calories that you may or may not need.



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
doyenne's picture

(post #41141, reply #2 of 57)

That's pretty scary. I hope it doesn't happen to you again but at least you'll recognize the warning signs.

I can't remember today what it was I  couldn't remember yesterday

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

3chang's picture

(post #41141, reply #3 of 57)

Good warning for all the bikers here, too. I don't bike as much in late summer as I do the rest of the year. Just too hot and dry. This is perhaps the best reason to swim instead of run or bike--no heat stroke! The worst reason to swim is that 1,023 other people are thinking along the same lines.


Sally, I'm sure the university has an olympic sized pool faculty can use, no? The one at UCLA is fantastic, and guaranteed, a 40 minute, 2km swim wipes me out as much as a 2 hour 40km hillclimb on a bike.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #41141, reply #4 of 57)

Today at work we saw a cop car stop a woman on a bicycle and give her a ticket.  We all went outside and cheered.

skat's picture

(post #41141, reply #5 of 57)

Thanks for the advice.  I've never had heatstroke, but have been continuing to run in the extremely hot and humid weather we've had here in Virginia lately.  Glad to hear you are okay...

TessaK's picture

(post #41141, reply #8 of 57)

 

Today at work we saw a cop car stop a woman on a bicycle and give her a ticket.  We all went outside and cheered


Why?

RuthWells's picture

(post #41141, reply #9 of 57)

Why did the cop give her the ticket?  And why did everyone cheer?


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

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MEANCHEF's picture

(post #41141, reply #13 of 57)

Going thru a stop sign.  These people are a menace in Seattle and generally obey no traffic laws.

MadMom's picture

(post #41141, reply #14 of 57)

I hear you!  Sort of the way I feel about some motorcycle riders...the ones who weave in and out of traffic, going about 90 mph, usually with no helmet.  It's a shame, because there are also a lot of responsible cyclists (motor or people-powered) who obey the traffic laws and just want to share the road.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

anneelsberry's picture

(post #41141, reply #15 of 57)

Well, one thing about scoff-law motorcyclists -- they soon become organ donors. Maybe there's some sort of karmic evening-out happening there.

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Jean's picture

(post #41141, reply #16 of 57)

evening-out


My idea of an evening out is more in the line of dinner and a movie.


Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves for they shall never cease to be amused. 

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
anneelsberry's picture

(post #41141, reply #18 of 57)

"evenint-out" -- check and balance then, though that makes me think of a Karma Bank with little buddha tellers.

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

MadMom's picture

(post #41141, reply #19 of 57)

I like to think that the gene pool is improved and the average IQ of the world raised just a smidgen every time one of these idiots does a "crash and burn."  My DH "rescued" a group of 5 or 6 very large redneck gentlemen whose boat (a small skiff which probably should have held one or two of them) sank in the Mississippi sound.  Shen he asked what on earth they were doing out there, it seems they were going out to try to raise the boat they had been riding in the day before (which had also sank.)  Geesh.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

StevenHB's picture

(post #41141, reply #20 of 57)

Can you say, "sh1t for brains"?


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
MadMom's picture

(post #41141, reply #21 of 57)

Yep!  My sentiments exactly.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Wolvie's picture

(post #41141, reply #27 of 57)

I REALLY hated it when they split the lanes in the tunnels in Boston. Yeesh.


Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time - Abe Lincoln.

 

StevenHB's picture

(post #41141, reply #17 of 57)

Lane-splitting, as I understand it's known, is a really, really bad idea for motorcyclists - generally deleterious to the physical health.



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
PeterDurand's picture

(post #41141, reply #26 of 57)

They are a menace everywhere. I hate holier than thou types.

The mind set: you are in a car = evil

me on bike = goodness

therefore : I can do anything I want, and if you hit me, I will sue (because you are evil)

Peter

gjander's picture

(post #41141, reply #28 of 57)

Oh come on now, that's an ugly stereotype.  Believe me, I've spent plenty of time on bikes and in cars both and can tell you that cars are the much greater menace.  It's true that some ill-behaved urban cyclists have given the rest of us a bad image but there are many good riders out there who don't deserve the way they are treated by drivers who seem to want to punish them for daring to be on the roads.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #41141, reply #29 of 57)

Hi,

An ugly stereotype? My comment is based on personal observation over the years. As a driver and pedestrian. For example when was the last time anyone saw a cyclist come to a complete stop at a stop sign (think going downhill)?

Cheers,

Peter

gjander's picture

(post #41141, reply #30 of 57)

First off, I meant to respond to Peter, not myself.  Peter, in your post you stated "They are a menace everywhere." which is a blanket statement that lumps everyone in a single category.  All cyclists everywhere are menaces.  If that isn't an ugly stereotype, I don't know what is.


 


9:47--Edited for clarity.


Edited 7/17/2003 9:49:09 AM ET by GJANDER


Edited 7/17/2003 9:49:37 AM ET by GJANDER

iguana667's picture

(post #41141, reply #32 of 57)

>Oh come on now, that's an ugly stereotype. Believe me, I've spent plenty of time on bikes and in cars both and can tell you that cars are the much greater menace. It's true that some ill-behaved urban cyclists have given the rest of us a bad image but there are many good riders out there who don't deserve the way they are treated by drivers who seem to want to punish them for daring to be on the roads.

It's an ugly stereotype with a grain of truth here in Chicago. That said, cars are definitely more of a menace, even from first principles-- even a small car weighs at least 10 times what a bike weighs, even including the rider. Think about it-- if that guy who had plowed into that farmers market had been riding a bike, we would have comedy instead of tragedy. When is the last time you heard of a bicyclist injuring someone other than himself?

Sure a lot of bicyclists are idiots and jerks-- that is also true of drivers. Sure a lot of bicyclists have a holier-than-thou attitude-- that is more than reciprocated by the cars attitudes: I MUST get to the next red light first; I am bigger than you, so get out of my way; the road is mine. Surely some of you who drive smaller cars see this too. Are all of you critics of bicyclists model drivers and pedestrians?

I ride my bike to work most days and try to be a model bicyclist, but I have been the recipient of some serious driver aggression. I have had people swerve to try to knock me over, have had things thrown at me (beer bottles, big gulp drinks-- full, of course)-- all this while riding completely within the rules of the road and in a designated bike lane. I have had people speed up behind me and honk at me to get out of their way when I was in the bike lane. I get yelled at more times than I care to remember-- often for actually following the rules of the road. Others of my bike buddies have even worse stories-- makes rolling through a stop sign seem benign.

I bet most of you who are so critical of bicyclists have not been on a bike in a long time. I invite you to pedal a mile in my shoes. I wish drivers were more understanding of bicyclists. I wish more bicyclists were more responsible. I wish the cops would enforce the rules of the road on all users-- cars, bicyclists and pedestrians. That would make life a lot better for all of us.

gjander's picture

(post #41141, reply #33 of 57)

Well said, iguana.  I've been the target of a lot of agression myself.  It's not only annoying, it is extremely dangerous to riders.  While I don't want to make any ugly stereotypes myself I can't remember a single time when I was yelled at, honked at, side swiped, cut off, or otherwise harrassed and looked up to see an obviously fit person driving by.

PeterDurand's picture

(post #41141, reply #37 of 57)

"...obviously fit person driving by."

???

gjander's picture

(post #41141, reply #41 of 57)

Sorry, I don't seem to be doing a good job of making myself very clear today.  What I meant to say is that it is usually obvious to me that the type of people iguana and I have encountered on the roads aren't spending a lot of time excercising outdoors, whether by cycling, running, or whatever.  In short, they are usually couch potatoes.  As iguana said, 'ride a mile in my shoes' and you'll see the issue from another perspective.


Cyclists who are running stop signs, weaving through old folks etc. aren't representative of the group as a whole.  You are applying your very narrow experience to a much larger sample and it isn't a fair thing to do.


It seems like to me if we can't all figure out a way to be more civil to each other on the roads we are in a heap of trouble.  That applies to cyclists and motorists. 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #41141, reply #42 of 57)

It seems like to me if we can't all figure out a way to be more civil to each other on the roads we are in a heap of trouble.  That applies to cyclists and motorists.


Exactly. Add a dose of common sense in with the civility, and you have the answer to world peace and and end to hunger and pollution.


I don't mind sharing the road with cyclists, but I too have seen far too much of the holier-than-thou (or more-fit/environmentally-sensitive-than-thou) attitude, combined with a complete lack of common sense on the part of the two-wheel brigade. Most egregious example was a young (of course!) bicycle courier, making a left-hand turn in a busy intersection, at rush hour, while talking on his cell phone. Stupid idiot?  Or just a suicidal anarchist?  Sheer, unmediated idiocy was the sight of two cyclists, on a narrow, twisting island road, stopping on the centre line, in the middle of a curve, while one of them bent over to tie his shoelace. With a baby in one of those (to my eye, anyway) precarious baby carriers hitched to the back bumper of the bike.  


Personally, I think the situation would be improved substantially if cyclists had to carry the same burdens of competency that car drivers do - that is, pass a licensing exam, carry insurance, be as responsible for following the rules of the road, and wear the appropriate safety gear (helmets, knee and elbow pads, safety harness, whatever...)  


 "People that are really weird can get into sensitive positions and have a tremendous impact on history."
 -- J. Danforth Quayle
iguana667's picture

(post #41141, reply #47 of 57)

>It seems like to me if we can't all figure out a way to be more civil to each other on the roads we are in a heap of trouble. That applies to cyclists and motorists.

Right on! I'm impressed by the level of anti-bike anger among the members of this board-- it sounds like Peter (IIRC, the ethical vegetarian) is about ready to eat barbecued bicylist. I think they're completely justified in being angry about all the egregious behavior by bicyclists too.

Where do you ride? All the complaints aside, I really love bicycling. I met my husband on a group bike ride 5 years ago.

MadMom's picture

(post #41141, reply #53 of 57)

iguana - I don't believe there is a great deal of "anti-bike anger" on this board.  There is a lot of impatience with the admittedly small percentage of bikers who not only put their lives in danger, but threaten others by their actions.  Just as I assume that the impatience of bikers with the (I would hope) small percentage of automobile drivers who are not willing to share the road does not indicate "anti-car anger," I would hope that those bikers who ride responsibly do not feel they are being indicted by the actions of those who do not.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

iguana667's picture

(post #41141, reply #54 of 57)

>I don't believe there is a great deal of "anti-bike anger" on this board.

Thanks for the reply-- If that's the score then I feel much better. My apologies for overinterpreting.

ig