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SallyBR1's picture

This morning Phil went to play golf with his buddies, one of them is a fireman, who also works with paramedics.

Last night they got a call from a 39 year old woman, who said she had fallen on the floor and was having trouble getting up. They drive there, and found out she weighs 400 pounds, and the reason she could not get up was simply her weight.

they needed 6 guys to put her in the ambulance and take to the hospital, just to make sure she was ok.

This is such a sad thing, I wonder if there is any concrete help that can be given to a person at this stage of obesity. Thirty nine years old, probably very lonely, probably feeling that there is no way out of her situation.

I guess my question - Gary, anyone? - is... can a person reach this weight through overeating alone, or is it always associated with some metabolic disorder? Are they beyond being helped?

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Gretchen's picture

(post #53183, reply #1 of 74)

Watch the talk shows. Oprah, et al, have these people on all the time. It ain't metabolic. They eat--people bring them the food.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SallyBR1's picture

(post #53183, reply #3 of 74)

I find it very hard to imagine eating enough food to gain that amount of weight. Pretty much you have to eat non-stop, and move your body very very little.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

shipscook's picture

(post #53183, reply #4 of 74)

 It is so sad and that has been my thought, how does one get that heavy. I knew at some point I have an addictive personality and had to be aware of all the stuff I love including food and alcohol. Guess I am lucky beacuse I work long periods in an alcohol free job. However being cook--I got all the good stuf.


At work I am so busy though, I honestly have to be careful to eat enough and well. But then I have a couple of months at home and------you know the rest of the story, check out new stuff at the market and meals out!


I do not feel good when I gain weight and also a bit OCD, refuse to but bigger jeans, manage to maintain.


But, o.k. 125-130 is fine for me. Once in a while I wander up in the high 130's. That's a warning, how does someone pass 175, 200, 250, 300????


I have lost two wonderful friends this year whose body shut down at those weights, one lovely man who had to be over 400, who loved good food,  but made me so sad when he came in the lodge where I was cooking.


I also have several friends who have had the surgery and can't change their diet--??


Nan

SallyBR1's picture

(post #53183, reply #5 of 74)

When my husband was in college, he used to live in a commune with a bunch of friends. One of them was a woman who had some weight issues, and later on became obese. She had the bypass surgery two years ago, it was very good for her. She lives in New Mexico, apparently there you can have very good medical assistance for this kind of problem. She had to go through 1 full year of therapy before being "approved" to get the procedure done.

So far she's managed to keep her weight off.

Back in Brazil I know of one couple = they are in their mid thirties, both had the surgery. After that, she got pregnant and had a baby. BOth have managed to keep the weight off. They are not thin, but definitely not obese.

To me, it is just so strange - to have to go through such a drastic procedure to be able to control how much you eat.
In my mind, food is pleasure - I don't want to be deprived of it, but I definitely don't want to be unable to stop when I had enough.

somehow for many, this switch - the "I've had enough-switch" is absent.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Gretchen's picture

(post #53183, reply #7 of 74)

It doesn't happen overnight--or in a year.

Gretchen

Gretchen
AnnL's picture

(post #53183, reply #8 of 74)

Yes, and that's the problem.  And, they keep eating more and more.  Instead of having one bowl of cereal for breakfast, they'll have 4 or 5, and then tell themselves they're doing good because they're eating cereal instead of eggs and bacon or pancakes.  But, 4 or 5 bowls of cereal is an enormous serving!  A normal serving is not even a full bowl.


Then, when they get extremely obese, they can't even have the by-pass surgery because their heart is already so stressed just by their excess weight, they might not survive the surgery.  But, if they don't have the surgery, they'll die because of the excess weight.  :-(


Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

kathymcmo's picture

(post #53183, reply #2 of 74)

I think that gastric stapling is probably the most likely to help with that sort of morbid obesity, but I don't think it's foolproof. Has to be accompanied by drastic behavior changes.

peteshlagor's picture

(post #53183, reply #6 of 74)

Well, Sally, over the past several weeks I've made a number of posts about the obese - both here and on Breaktime.  Cumulatively, I've seen maybe two responses in support of my comments.  All of the rest call me rude, insensitive, and all other forms of insults.


Technically, recently I've seen scientific reports that indicate the obese have shrunken brain sizes.  Medically, of course there are hormonal conditions (thyroid, adrenal, etc.) that can enhance the effect.  But psychologically, my opine is that society, especially the mothers of such, support and encourage obesity.  And socialeconomically, our American food chain encourages such with it's emphasis upon corn as well as the fast food junk stuffed down our throats.  Not to keep fine cuisine out of the picture either, but what is served to us in even the best of resturants?  High fat, high calorie selections.


And this "discussion" about health care reform all appears to have at it's roots that the obese are "entitled" to being fat with the lean being expected to underwrite this desctructive behavior.  As evidenced by clothing costs (when I wore size 38 pants, there was twice as much fabric as my current size 30, same price), travel costs (a 90# woman paying th esame for an airplane ticket as a 400#'er), health care premiums, and more. 


I'm believing the name of the magazine should be changed from Fine Cooking to Fine Gluttony.


We need to address the issue through education and increased intolerance towards the "victims" (as they see themselves).  Education needs to be started very early and continue EVERY YEAR through all levels of school.  We need to study our bodies in 1st grade and continue to focus more and more on what makes us the same as well as what makes us different.  To me, properly done, this will also address the inappropriate racist opinions still underlying our society.


Fatness is very cureable.  I've done it and so can most everyone else - IF they want to.

AnnL's picture

(post #53183, reply #9 of 74)

Your posts come across as very judgemental, that's the problem.  Fine Cooking is hardly Fine Gluttony.   Most of the recipes in FC are much healthier for us than eating pre-packaged crap or McDonald's or a supersized meal at most chain restaurants.  All in moderation.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

MadMom's picture

(post #53183, reply #11 of 74)

I agree.  Everyone knows that obesity is a problem, and I speak as someone who has struggled with weight most of my life.  Until I was 30, no matter how much I ate, I could not gain weight.  After that, I went through a period where I gained weight easily but could also take it off easily.  Now, at almost seventy, I find that it is easier to gain than to shed pounds.  I try to eat in moderation, certainly don't eat five bowls of cereal every morning (I have one, no toast, black coffee).  Still, it's harder to lose as you get older.  I don't weigh four hundred pounds, not even half of that, still, I can sympathize with those who do.  They need help and sympathy, not blanket condemnation.  We recognize alcoholism as a disease, why cannot we recognize that morbid obesity is also a disease?  Rather than condemn those who suffer, wouldn't we be better off trying to help them maintain a reasonable weight? 


I agree about the harmful effects of fast food, processed food, HFCS, and all of that.  Perhaps we should spend more energy trying to ban or limit harmful substances and less energy blaming those who partake of them.  To call Fine Cooking Fine Gluttony is just ridiculous, IMNSO.  If Pete wants agreement, he might try being more rational and less confrontational.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
SallyBR1's picture

(post #53183, reply #12 of 74)

To give you an example of something I find terribly wrong.

you know those soda vending machines? In our building we used to have one that sold "regular" size cans. Plus it also had low fat milk and orange juice options.

they took those away last year, installed four fancy machines, all selling HUGE soda bottles - I don't know the size exactly but they are gigantic. No more milk, no more orange juice. There are options like "vitamin water", which I find ridiculous, one more excuse to have plastic garbage accumulated everywhere.

NOw, why an academic institution, full of college students, graduate students, would opt for selling stuff that is only going to make obesity issues worse?

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

roz's picture

(post #53183, reply #13 of 74)

<<<NOw, why an academic institution, full of college students, graduate students, would opt for selling stuff that is only going to make obesity issues worse?>>>

Follow the $dollar and you will have your answer. Probably the school gets a kickback from the distributor.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Gretchen's picture

(post #53183, reply #10 of 74)

Get off your high horse.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #53183, reply #43 of 74)

"I'm believing the name of the magazine should be changed from Fine Cooking to Fine Gluttony."
How can you possibly make such a ludicrous statement. There's a contemporary balance of broad food choices, reasonable portions and a representation of foods that contribute to eating for health and satisfaction, which is important, at the same time.

There's nothing about the normal obese person's consumption of food that's represented by the what's offered in the magazine.

Florida2's picture

(post #53183, reply #14 of 74)

The obesity epidemic is due to a complex interaction of many factors, not just "will power". The book Good Calories, Bad Calories does a great job of reviewing the research and events that have contributed to this epidemic


1. Insufficient time in the family to cook nutritious needs-- this leads to over reliance upon hi carbohydrate food, fast foods and processed foods that are high in HFCS and calories. We often eat on the fly, even in the car, depending upon calorie dense processed snack foods.


Families are exhausted with both parents working full time jobs and signing up kids for all kinds of after school lessons and events. There is too little time to eat properly.


2. The dinner plate size has actually increased by quite a bit, which encourages people to put more food on the plate. Research shows that this will indeed result in people eating more than in the past when plates were much smaller.


3. The sedentary lifestyle of our culture creates a lower metabolism and lower muscle mass, hence increased weight gain if calories are not reduced by enough to match a sedentary lifestyle.


4. The food industry has done research to learn how to trick the consumer into wanting more food by creating processed foods with just the right salt, sugar and fat content (betcha can't eat just one)


5. The culture as a whole is focussed upon accepting larger waistlines so that people do not feel like their weight is as "large" an issue as in the past when obesity was not epidemic. A psychologist, last year , even  (wrongly IMO) stated that behavioral health specialists should stop trying to change maladaptive eating patterns, and focus on helping people to accept themselves no matter their "shape" (Can you imagine if the profession took that same attitude toward cigarette smoking?)


6. The medical establishment and nutrition people in the govt are operating on outdated ideas that are not supported by research. Fat is stored in the body when too much carb compared to intake of protein, is ingested, resulting in the pancrease secreting large amounts of insulin to deal with it, and signaling the body to store the calories as "fat" and dont release the "fat" even with excersie. It also signals the body to manufacture more cholesterol when the carb/protein ratio is too large. (Again, read Good Calories, Bad Calories if you want to see ther esearch on this)


7. People, including children, in our culture are operating on a chronic sleep deficit. This affects appetite and results in ingesting excess calories.


8. Schools have gotten rid of outdoor play time, or severely limited it. In our local area, some schools have "no" recess at all. Some have "recess" which is not a play based activity time, but consists of kids  walking in Circles (like they do in prison). They also serve food that is very high in carbs, lower in protein.


9. Schools still have vending machines on their campus with soda's and calorie dense processed food snacks. I recall complaining about this 20 years ago when my oldest entered kindergarten, and was told I was "nuts" to complain aobut this wonderful convenience. Go figure.


10. Many people are unaware of basic nutrition and just eat for "fun".


I am sure there are more than ten reasons besides will power that we are in an epidemic. Will power is important, but I do not think its the only factor.


I'd like to see the President, in the middle of his first term, start an initiative to seriously address this problem.


 


 

Heather's picture

(post #53183, reply #15 of 74)

Add to your list the fact that kids don't walk or ride bikes to school anymore--every school in our area has a big traffic jam every morning and afternoon.

madnoodle's picture

(post #53183, reply #23 of 74)

Mine do.  Every single day. 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Heather's picture

(post #53183, reply #24 of 74)

Good for them! Everyone here seems to have hysterical fears of child abduction.


Edited 10/5/2009 12:06 am by Heather

AnnL's picture

(post #53183, reply #26 of 74)

I read in some column last week or the week before about the how sad it is that kids don't/can't walk to school any more.  It even mentioned there are some areas where parents could be considered negligent letting their kids walk to school!  I was appalled. 

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

DeannaS's picture

(post #53183, reply #27 of 74)

My kid walks to school every day - and one of us walks with him. Bonus exercise for the parent, too. :)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #53183, reply #28 of 74)

Parents around here stand with their children at the school bus stops--and meet them when they come home.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #53183, reply #29 of 74)

We have to pick him up at school - they wouldn't let him walk home on his own yet. (He's only in first grade.) Our school is just a couple of blocks away, but there's a busy street to cross. Last week on my day to take him to school, he pointed out that one of his friends only gets walked to the busy street and her mom watches her cross and lets her go the rest of the way by herself. (The school is right across the street.) I said, "I'd be okay with that - would you like to do that?" He said, "No mom, I like that you guys walk me all the way to the school." I'm not arguing with that. :) Soon enough he'll be sick of us.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Jean's picture

(post #53183, reply #33 of 74)

That is precious, treasure it.


"The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled,
public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
                                               - Cicero  - 55 BC
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Heather's picture

(post #53183, reply #36 of 74)

I think it is probably true here now that parents would be considered negligent, particularly in elementary school.
I'm glad to hear there are so many kids who still walk to school in other places.

MadMom's picture

(post #53183, reply #37 of 74)

I walked seventeen blocks to school in a neighborhood that I wouldn't drive through now, even with my doors locked.  How times have changed.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

leonap's picture

(post #53183, reply #39 of 74)

I walked a mile and can barely remember my older siblings accompanying me maybe the first year. It was uphill both ways, snow on the ground and I was barefoot. Or so, DS says when DH or I reminisce. We lived in Aurora, CO, for one school year when DS1 was in the 5th grade. The only buses were for the special needs kids. There were schools everywhere though. They had a walkover across the busy street DS had to cross. School was never called off due to the weather and there was always some snow on the ground somewhere. Imagine the money they save not having to bus the kids, not to mention the children are getting exercise. I was very impressed.

AnnL's picture

(post #53183, reply #38 of 74)

I've tried googling around but can't find the column.  The columnist noted one incident in which a mother WAS reprimanded by the police because her teenaged son was walking to soccer practice a mile from their house!  She could have been charged with child endangerment!  He didn't say where this incident happened.


Elementary kids should be driven or walked to school,  I agree, although I used to walk home from school alone starting in 1st grade and it was probably a mile.  No one thought anything of it back then.  Not now.  When I'm on my morning walk with the dogs, it's usually during the "school bus rush" and two neighbors car pool--they alternate driving their kids down to the bus stop.  I see the mothers walk their kids across the street to the other house and then stand in the driveway and watch until the kid either goes in the house or the car.  These are middle school kids, so at least 12 yo.  Then, other parents let their middle school kids walk all the way down to the bus stop in the dark by themselves.  


Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Florida2's picture

(post #53183, reply #40 of 74)

Not necessarily hysterical. My friend's son was abducted. He lived to tell the tale. We have about 4 attempted abductions in my little county every year.


And we have a few run over on their way to school-- many mornings kids have to walk in the dark to get to the bus or to school, until the time change.

Canuck's picture

(post #53183, reply #25 of 74)

All three of mine walk to school too.


How was your sister's wedding and the Toronto trip?

madnoodle's picture

(post #53183, reply #34 of 74)

Great, thanks.  The weather was crummy, but we had lots of fun anyway.  One highlight was taking the ferry to Toronto Island with an old friend of my MIL.  Wards Island (do I have that right?) is absolutely beautiful.  The wedding itself was in St. James Park, and featured a very entertaining homeless guy (who actually went back to the shelter and changed into a nicer shirt when he heard there was going to be a wedding) and many pigeons.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?