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Need a book suggestion

SuB's picture

My turn to propose a book for my book group on Tuesday.  The last two books we've read have been serious to the point of depressing, so I'd really like to lighten things up this time.  I need a book that's funny but not slapstick, ideally something like a cross between authors Christopher Moore, Tom Robbins, and Carl Hiaasen.  Anyone?  Thanks...


Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.  Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.   -- Groucho Marx


Edited 7/31/2005 2:38 pm ET by Sue B.


Edited 7/31/2005 2:40 pm ET by Sue B.

Cheers, Sue B.

The older I get, the better I was.

NanaC's picture

(post #43877, reply #54 of 87)

The problem with libraries is that they always want their books back a year or two before I'm quite ready to relinquish them. (Though they are useful places for books I don't necessarily want to own!)


ITA!  I use the library for books I will probably only read once, like mysteries, or to check over an expensive book I may want to own.  Just found Maggie Glezer's Artisan Baking Across America among the oversized books today!  And Chef Robert recently bought McGee's On Food and Cooking after borrowing it for 2 weeks to look it over.

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

sarahendipity's picture

(post #43877, reply #35 of 87)

Did you manage to get sour cherries? I called a couple weeks ago to find that the season had ended at the beginning of July. They did have some already pitted and frozen ones, so my husband went to pick them up on Saturday. Even with the premium on price, I'm really glad not to be pitting 20lbs of sour cherries. A couple years ago I got 25lbs and pitted them all and froze them in ziploc bags. I was very happy that I wasn't finding any pits, until I got to the last bag. 17 pits! Must have been getting tired! It was interesting to have to suck every mouthful before chewing.


Regarding Amazon, when I bought all the HP books, I signed up again with a different e-mail and credit card to get the $10 off. That would get old fast though! Sometimes you can find $5 coupons, and I've even had Amazon send me some in their e-mails.



I'm afraid of meeting God. I'm afraid he'll sneeze and I won't know what to say.


Edited 8/1/2005 10:46 pm ET by sarahendipity

I spilled my GORP on Mt. Baldy.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #43877, reply #38 of 87)

grrr... I went trekking out to the farm on Sunday in hopes of scoring some cherries, but no luck - evidently they sold out early this year. That'll teach me to trust some website's dates. Next year I'll make a point of calling early and reserving.





"All of life's big problems include the words "indictment" or "inoperable." Everything else is small stuff." Alton Brown


http://costofwar.com/

sarahendipity's picture

(post #43877, reply #52 of 87)

Apparently the dates are an estimate that they make in February, so I guess they were a little off this year!


 


I'm afraid of meeting God. I'm afraid he'll sneeze and I won't know what to say.

I spilled my GORP on Mt. Baldy.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #43877, reply #53 of 87)

I gathered that - actually had a very pleasant chat with one of the owners on Sunday. I've really been spoiled because for years I had a very prolific sour cherry tree in my backyard, which produced more than enough for me and the birds. Ah well...it helps a lot that LoML is not fond of cherries, so at least I've spred myself the agony of having to devour any cherry pies/jams/strudels all by my lonesome.





"All of life's big problems include the words "indictment" or "inoperable." Everything else is small stuff." Alton Brown


http://costofwar.com/

soccermom's picture

(post #43877, reply #55 of 87)

I don't know if you have Loblaws/Real Canadian Superstores, but ours usually get in the pails of the sour cherries and bing cherries. Because they don't sell lots, they keep them in the store freezers and you have to ask for them. I've bought a bucket for the last few years and been happy with the quantity. They've ranged from $10 to $14. May be worth a try if you've missed the farm.


 


 

 

 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #43877, reply #58 of 87)

Thanks, there's a Superstore just a few blocks from us. I'll check there later today.





"All of life's big problems include the words "indictment" or "inoperable." Everything else is small stuff." Alton Brown


http://costofwar.com/

soccermom's picture

(post #43877, reply #59 of 87)

I'll keep my fingers crossed for you; the bucket would be a little too big and sticky to ship. :)

 


 

 

 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #43877, reply #60 of 87)

Not to mention what thawed cherry juice would do to the rest of Her Majesty's mail! &8:^}





"All of life's big problems include the words "indictment" or "inoperable." Everything else is small stuff." Alton Brown


http://costofwar.com/

mimi54's picture

(post #43877, reply #37 of 87)

Sue B.


I read alot of different books/authors, they are my narcotic of choice.  So much of it is only so-so.  If you do find a great author too often every book they write is a repeat of the same formula. 


But then you read something like The Time Traveler's Wife or The Rule of Four and you are in heaven.  When I was done with them I sent them on to my daughter and her fiance, who always tease me about reading bodice rippers (once, years ago at the beach, and they never let me forget it).


mimi   

KarenP's picture

(post #43877, reply #4 of 87)

For a little irony, synchronicity even better, how about taking a look at Angry Housewives Eating BonBons by Laura Landvik.  It's the story of a book club formed by a neighborhood of women and follows them through the times of their lives.  Each chapter is who selected the book, why they selected the book and the story that goes along with that time. The Janet Evanovich Stephanie Plum books are a riot if nobody has read them.  I'm about to start "Those Is My Words", which I know nothing about.


Edited 7/31/2005 6:01 pm ET by KarenP

MadMom's picture

(post #43877, reply #5 of 87)

Heard an interview with Janet Evanovich on NPR today.  She is a real hoot.  Said she started out writing romance novels, but ran out of positions, so she decided to write mysteries.  Besides, she pointed out she was entering menopause, so murder was much more on her mind than sex!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

KarenP's picture

(post #43877, reply #6 of 87)


 

Heard an interview with Janet Evanovich on NPR today.  She is a real hoot

  I have the 11th Stephanie Plum sitting in front of me.  In book 1 she has lost her job as a lingerie buyer for the May Company so becomes a bounty hunter for her cousin Vinnie.  They are fun books.


 

dixie1's picture

(post #43877, reply #16 of 87)

I have the 11th one also, but not yet read. I have gotten bogged down reading Julia Spencer-Fleming's books. While they are okay, they are not as good to me as Janet Evanovich. I don't like JE's romance novels nearly as much as the Stephanie Plum series.

Lword's picture

(post #43877, reply #7 of 87)

That was a great interview! I plan to write to her and NPR to encourage more of the same.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #43877, reply #8 of 87)

I've been slowly savouring Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell, and can't recommend it highly enough. Very funny, but also very interesting study of Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley assassinations - great history, told from a decidely screw-ball point of view.


I'd also plug anything by Bill Bryson, but a really good start might be his first, "The Lost Continent", about his travels through small-town America.






"All of life's big problems include the words "indictment" or "inoperable." Everything else is small stuff." Alton Brown


http://costofwar.com/

Gretchen's picture

(post #43877, reply #10 of 87)

Now, there IS a  hoot==Sarah Vowell.  When she, Ira Glass and David Sedearis get together it is a manic impression.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #43877, reply #9 of 87)

It was on NPR but really on Wait Wait Don't Tell Me.  The humor on that show has become incredibly good.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #43877, reply #11 of 87)

Right...she was on for the "not my job" or whatever they call it segment.  I only listen to snippets of public radio whenever I'm in the car, so sometimes don't even know what show is on.  She was funny, though.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #43877, reply #12 of 87)

She really was. And very few of the celebrities they get for that segment "win". She did.  It was a funny segment.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lword's picture

(post #43877, reply #13 of 87)

Thanks! Wait Wait is fabulous, very cutting edge with great guests who add good humor to any situation and always elicit many a devious chuckle or fullout laugh - even more laughs per moment than from my next NPR favorite, Michael Feldman, whom I adore even when he is annoying which is a good portion of the time ;)  While I'm at it, Ira Glass is also mesmerizing, nearly hypnotizing with his voice. If you have other recommendations I am interested!


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Gretchen's picture

(post #43877, reply #15 of 87)

You really might enjoy Ira Glass's CD of his shows.  I can't quite remember the title now but it is a double CD.  Some of the stories are absolutely doubling over laughing--like the cops and the squirrel.  He is truly a gifted interviewer, of a different sort.  You might look on his website.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SondraG's picture

(post #43877, reply #18 of 87)

If you've never read Sharyn McCrumb's books, you've missed some really interesting stories.  Most are of the historical genre, based in the foothills of Western Carolina/Virginia, some are more comtemporary and funny, like the PMS Outlaws and St Dale.  St Dale is the latest and I hesitated to read it because it is a work of fiction about Dale Earnhart (I.e., "St Dale").  However, I love her books so much, I decided to try it and was thoroughly entertained and got a great education on Nascar racing (not into racing, but she made it very interesting).  It might make a good book for a book club, because it is actually a contemporary retelling of the Canterbury Tales.  Well written, beautifully researched, inspirational and funny.


 

 

AJ12754's picture

(post #43877, reply #24 of 87)

How about one of the Thursday Next mysteries (by Jasper Fforde) -- she's a futuristic literatec (literary detective) who solves mysteries my entering into great works of literature -- very funny -- the first in the series is The Eyre Affair.


Another interesting book is The Dogs of Babel about a husband who works with his dog to solve hi wife's murder.


Edited 8/1/2005 1:53 pm ET by AJ12754

Cave obdurationem cordis

hambiscuit2's picture

(post #43877, reply #47 of 87)

Check out Augusten Burroughs. He has several books and all are absolutely hilarious, including "Running With Scissors", about his totally dysfunctional and tragic childhood.

I think my favorite is "Sellevision"......no, "magical Thinking". It's a hard call for the favorite.

Marcia's picture

(post #43877, reply #56 of 87)

What book did you end up proposing, Sue?

samchang's picture

(post #43877, reply #76 of 87)

Good news on the book front: Barry Hughart's "The Bridge of Birds" is back in print and is easily available on Amazon. This is one fantasy book that has perfect pitch. I can't find one fault in it, either technically or linguistically. It reads far longer than it is (which in this case is a good thing) in that by the time you've read through the 226 pages, you will have absorbed enough of an 'ancient China that never was' to make you feel comfort and familiarity with its culture and sights that never were (if that makes sense).